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  1. #6
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    Now that I think about it, the only Judes I'd ever met were Catholic, but I have met a few Jewish Judahs. That said, I think its fine for a Jewish child because it is just an English form of Judah (which is a Jewish name) and its means "Jewish." I wouldn't think its weird at all. I love Jude and I think it goes great with Asher and Micah.
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  2. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaymin2 View Post
    That said, I think its fine for a Jewish child because it is just an English form of Judah (which is a Jewish name) and its means "Jewish."
    Not exactly. Jude may have been an English form of Jude to differentiate between Judas Escariot and the other Judahs/Judases/Judes in the Bible, but Judah/Jude did not originally mean "Jewish"--it means "praise; thanks". Jews were required to wear stars of David with the word "Jude" on them to identify them as Jews just before and during Nazi Europe. It was demeaning and horrible, and just one of the ways the Nazis made Jews to feel less than human. It may not hold all of those connotations to many people now, but I'm sure that it would be a very touchy subject to some Jews, and a very painful reminder of what they had to go through during the Holocaust. My best friend is Jewish, and she has grandparents who survived the Holocaust, and it was a very real and a very horrible hell for them, and I can imagine that if my friend had named her son Jude, it would have been very painful for her grandfather.

    I'm not sure if this is the concerns the OP had, but I could see why the OP would be concerned about using Jude with the associations it has for some Jews, that, and some of the prejudice and hatred that some people still bear.
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  3. #10
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    I've known a number of Jewish kids who answered to Jude but were named Judah.

    The Nazis weren't taking a random Biblical word and just using it to mean Jews were less than human, they were taking the word Jew and using it as subhuman. I've never known a Jewish person of the WWII generation to think Judah/Yehudah was an unusable name because the Nazis used it as a dirty word. The most I've heard is some concern that some names are so Jewish the kid might get beat up for it or whatever.

    The reason I think some Jews shy away from using Jude is Judas, and how Jewish already often already get called "Christkiller" by bullies. My personal take (as a random Jew-on-the-street) is I got called Christkiller growing up anyway; why avoid a great name with a great Jewish history because of a handful of malcontent anti-Semites? But it's not the most low-key name for a Jewish kid to have to bear, it's true.

    But that would go for Judah as well, and I would really find it tragic if Judah fell out of use because of that.

  4. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ashthedreamer View Post
    Not exactly. Jude may have been an English form of Jude to differentiate between Judas Escariot and the other Judahs/Judases/Judes in the Bible, but Judah/Jude did not originally mean "Jewish"--it means "praise; thanks". Jews were required to wear stars of David with the word "Jude" on them to identify them as Jews just before and during Nazi Europe. It was demeaning and horrible, and just one of the ways the Nazis made Jews to feel less than human. It may not hold all of those connotations to many people now, but I'm sure that it would be a very touchy subject to some Jews, and a very painful reminder of what they had to go through during the Holocaust. My best friend is Jewish, and she has grandparents who survived the Holocaust, and it was a very real and a very horrible hell for them, and I can imagine that if my friend had named her son Jude, it would have been very painful for her grandfather.

    I'm not sure if this is the concerns the OP had, but I could see why the OP would be concerned about using Jude with the associations it has for some Jews, that, and some of the prejudice and hatred that some people still bear.

    The name of the Jewish people get their name from the tribe of Judah, so in a sense, it could also be translated as meaning "Jewish" or from the tribe of Judah.. Jude is a form of Judah from my understanding. I was not referring to the German word for "Jewish." You are right, I was confusing Judah's etymology with Judith which means "woman from Judaea" or "Jewish woman", but I have read other sources list it as a feminine form of Judah which means "praise."

    It also the name of a major Catholic saint, and the Judes I knew tended to come from really Catholic homes, so that is what I thought the OP was referring to.

    I am Jewish myself, and I never considered the Holocaust associations, but I guess now that I think about it, then maybe it is not such a good idea, but keep in mind that Jewish women were also forced to change their name to Sarah during that time, but it still shouldn't necessarily bar someone Jewish from using Sarah as a name. It is also still the general masculine term for Jewish both in German and Swedish, so maybe it would be a little odd.
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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripedsocks View Post
    I've known a number of Jewish kids who answered to Jude but were named Judah.

    The Nazis weren't taking a random Biblical word and just using it to mean Jews were less than human, they were taking the word Jew and using it as subhuman. I've never known a Jewish person of the WWII generation to think Judah/Yehudah was an unusable name because the Nazis used it as a dirty word. The most I've heard is some concern that some names are so Jewish the kid might get beat up for it or whatever.

    The reason I think some Jews shy away from using Jude is Judas, and how Jewish already often already get called "Christkiller" by bullies. My personal take (as a random Jew-on-the-street) is I got called Christkiller growing up anyway; why avoid a great name with a great Jewish history because of a handful of malcontent anti-Semites? But it's not the most low-key name for a Jewish kid to have to bear, it's true.

    But that would go for Judah as well, and I would really find it tragic if Judah fell out of use because of that.
    Hmm. I don't think it had anything to do with Judas Iscariot, but maybe I am wrong. Like I said, the only people I know named Jude were people from devout Catholic homes, due to a saint that appears in the New Testament, (the patron saint of lost causes), not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, but I guess in reality and in the original translation of the New Testament, both characters shared the same name. Judas is just the Greek form of Yehuda, hence Judah, so it was a really common name among Jews back then.

    I have met plenty of Judahs and Yehudas, I have never thought about Jude being taboo for Jews. It has never been broached among my Jewish relatives or friends, but like the usage of Jude among devout Catholics, I noticed that Judah and Yehudah tended to be used more among Orthodox or Hassidic Jews. Both Jude and Judah tend to have extremely religious overtones either way, and not in a bad way.

    But you are spot on about the German word "jude." It was originally just the German word for a Jewish person and the Nazis changed it into a dirty word. It is still the regular term for a Jewish person in German and in Swedish and I think the Nazis used the term for "Jewish" on the stars depending on which country they were in.

    I agree with you on all points though. It is a perfectly great name with some great Jewish history.
    Last edited by shaymin2; April 25th, 2012 at 02:31 AM.
    Looking for a unique yet legitimate name, check out my growing database of names, I have names from Albanian to Yiddish http://legitbabenames.wordpress.com

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