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  1. #1
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    Japanese names

    I really like Japanese names but have no ties to the culture so I would hesitate to use them but I found some that I think would work without being hard to pronounce or seeming too crazy, what do you think? Do you have any to add? Feel free to correct my pronunciations if I'm wrong

    Satomi (SAH toh mee) "beauty and wisdom" 'wise beauty" has more meanings according to other sites but they all pertain to beauty.

    Manami (MAH nah mee) "love, affection" "beautiful love"

    Sayuri (SAH yu ree) "small lily"

    *Momoko - (MOH moh koh means "peach child) )I wouldnt use this but I know a Japanese girl with this name, it's so cute
    Josephine Athénaïs - Josephine Ivy - Myriam Athénaïs - Vivienne Josephine
    Athena Beatrice - Beatrice Cecile - Eleanor Anne-Sophie -Myriam Beatrice - Meredith Elizabeth
    Ambrose Aristide - Ulysses Aristide

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  2. #3
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    Aug 2011
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    I love Japanese names. I'm a big fan of Rin personally.

  3. #5
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    You do seem to have selected some with a minimum of pronunciation issues: no R, no E ending (which English speakers may not know isn't silent), no successive vowels (which English speakers may not know are usually not blended, and if they are, paired vowels are often the most problematic to pronounce). I wouldn't be quite so cautious myself...

    A person with a Japanese name will get two assumptions. If they don't show visible Asian ancestry, they will get "Japanophile", which nowadays normally means "otaku". As an otaku myself, I admit I make those assumptions... though they are statistically supported.

    Examination of US naming statistics shows that most Japanese-Americans don't have Japanese first names; there aren't nearly enough given to make up for the proportion of the population that's Japanese. This fits with the names of most Asian-Americans I know of. Even of the number that are given, I have to wonder how many are actually used by Japanese. The obvious outliers aren't. Raiden - which to my knowledge isn't used as a personal name in Japan, unlike Thor in Scandinavia - and Amaya are likely being used by parents who don't know their origin or at least don't care. (Raiden isn't even said like Aiden, but like rider with an N!) Akira, used mainly on girls in the US, presumably dates to the movie of that name. I believe Akira is unisex in Japanese, but the US use is odd considering the eponymous hero of Akira is male. Off the top 1000, the relatively strong showing by Sayuri suggests the influence of Memoirs of a Geisha. I have no idea how common Sakura is in its home country - it's certainly common in fiction, but it looks like the sort of name that might appeal more to writers than parents. Naturally, it does relatively well in English, because it's Japan's most familiar flower and thus something one might hope other English speakers could recognize.

    Naturally, I have some attraction to Japanese names. Part of it is the sound: vowel-heavy but maintaining strong consonants, and they don't automatically stress the first syllable.

    My first test for a Japanese name is "Do I only think of one person when I hear it?"
    Last edited by triplicate; November 5th, 2011 at 07:05 PM.

  4. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by triplicate View Post
    A person with a Japanese name will get two assumptions. If they don't show visible Asian ancestry, they will get "Japanophile", which nowadays normally means "otaku". As an otaku myself, I admit I make those assumptions... though they are statistically supported.

    Examination of US naming statistics shows that most Japanese-Americans don't have Japanese first names; there aren't nearly enough given to make up for the proportion of the population that's Japanese. This fits with the names of most Asian-Americans I know of. Even of the number that are given, I have to wonder how many are actually used by Japanese.

    I agree with this. I'm actually half-Chinese, and I don't have a Chinese name. I have a nickname used when we go to Taiwan for my relatives, but not a given one. My mom moved her Chinese name to the middle spot and took on an English first name. It's to avoid mispronunciation and to assimilate into the new culture. In college, I only met a couple of Asian girls who actually did not take on an English name. The reasoning for this is usually because they plan on living in China after college. They have no need to take on an English name.

    Being a big fan of anime and mange, though I don't know if I would consider myself an otaku, I think if you had no Japanese background and used the name, that would make you an otaku. There are just certain borders I wouldn't cross. I'd save those pretty Japanese names for a pet.
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  5. #9
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    I don't think you have to have ties, it's just like using a french name if your not french. I have a few Japanese name son my list.
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