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  1. #11

    Re: Four kinds of "confusing" names

    Eh, my husband got stuck with a stinker of a first name and has been going by his mn for most of his life. I don't think his mom planned it that way, however. I will say that it creates much more amusement when friends find out his "real" name than it has ever created confusion on the part of teachers or financial institutions. Actually, a lot of my friends go by their mns because there are just too many people in our age bracket with the same first names...not much naming creativity within our SES in the late 70s. It honestly doesn't bother me. I save my indignation for people giving childish names or nn as full names (frequently the same thing).

    Frankly, I stopped worrying about giving our kid a hard to pronounce name when my teacher-friends started discussing the fact that NO ONE has easy names anymore, especially in a school district as diverse as ours. Our kid will probably be in a class with a Jai'breon, a Valeria and at least one Atticus...and those are the straightforward names.
    fave girls: November~Willowbrooke~Owen~Tahlene~Meraine
    fave boys: Hunter~Jeremiah~Jhoan~Revere~Breslin

    *November & Hunter*

  2. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    71

    Re: Four kinds of "confusing" names

    Basically I wouldn't do any of these intentionally.

    1. Using the middle name as the name your child goes by.
    I don't really mind this one at all, although I wouldn't do it intentionally. Although it totally makes sense if it's a jr.

    2. Using a name more commonly associated with the opposite gender.
    For some reason I see giving a girl a boy's name is not as big of a deal as the other way around. Although this rule completely ruined the idea of naming a son Avery, I wouldn't want him to be the one male Avery in his grade, alongside 3 females with the same name... Tragic, but I've move onto other names, and actually started considering Avery for a girl.

    3. Using a name that is often misspelled (or spelled in a non-standard way).
    I suppose if there's no standard spelling then it doesn't matter, but if there is a standard spelling, I'd rather see it that way. My nephew Camron will never be able to get a Disney mug with his name spelled correctly like his brothers Tyler, Zach and Drew.

    4. Using a name that is often mispronounced.
    I just feel bad for these people. I always liked that my name is easy to spell and pronounce, but not ultra common for my generation ie. Katie. I wouldn't like it if I knew my name was the butchered mumble of sounds that came after a long pause, or to have to constantly correct people.

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    229

    Re: Four kinds of "confusing" names

    Gee, I guess I am "guilty" of #1 and #2.
    We named our son after his grandfather and great-grandfather, both of whom are deceased. We call him a nn of the middle because there is a nephew who was also named after the grandfather and goes by that name. With the same last name, we thought it would be confusing. People get over it quickly though.
    #2 I am Lesley and while it is the "correct" female spelling according to people in Britain where the name originated, I am constantly correcting people here in the US. In fact, it is a marker for me. If someone continually misspells my name, even after I correct them, it tells me quite a lot about that person. This was esp. helpful when I was working and would interview someone and get a thank you note with the wrong spelling!!
    OOps.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,510

    Re: Four kinds of "confusing" names

    Quote Originally Posted by babyhansolo
    2. Using a name more commonly associated with the opposite gender.
    For some reason I see giving a girl a boy's name is not as big of a deal as the other way around. Although this rule completely ruined the idea of naming a son Avery, I wouldn't want him to be the one male Avery in his grade, alongside 3 females with the same name... Tragic, but I've move onto other names, and actually started considering Avery for a girl.
    Why would it bother you if he had a girl in his class with the same name? Why wouldn't it bother you if a girl shared her name with a boy? (I'm a guy with a name that is more common for females and it never irked me. Then again I was not strongly ingrained to think that "girly" is bad.) Plus, these days even with the most popular names the chances of sharing it with anyone - boy or girl - is quite a bit lower than when you or your parents were growing up. If you like Avery for a boy by all means use it and don't contribute to its falling masculinity!

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,510

    Re: Four kinds of "confusing" names

    On the subject of issues with gender confusion, there is one advantage that males with unisex have over their female counterparts (at least in the U.S.): No "false demand" letter from the Selective Service telling you to register or face penalties (I've known girls with boy names who got them). Of course the guys in question still have to register (but the ladies in question often have to submit proof such as a birth certificate that they're actually female to get out of it). The girls with unisex names get the converging waves here, while the boys with unisex names are at the diverging end.

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