Names Searched Right Now:
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 6 to 10 of 34
  1. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    275

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    I think it's true that people who are open to using unisex names are more open to boys being interested in "girly" things. We certainly are... My son, Sidney, is only 2 months old at the moment but we have no problems at all if when he gets older he wants a pink bike/bedroom or to play with dolls etc. I mean why not?! If we end up having a girl and she wants to play with soldiers and trucks etc. then thats fine too... I don't see the big deal.

    I think it was on the Child of our Time TV program (may just a be a British thing... those of you from the US - they have been following a few children born in the millenium every year until they are grown up to chart their development) where they showed a 10 year old boy actually had more "girlfriends" than those who had had the traditional boys upbringing - he could actually talk to them whereas the others who had been discouraged from "girly" behaviour couldn't. He had no problems with riding a pink bike as to him it as just a bike... etc. Just goes to show that maybe enforcing the macho thing on boys is actually achieving the opposite!

    Interesting topic!

    Rachel

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    15,500

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Oh good ,another male Nameberry. And I love your pseudonym, Jackobeam! Very memorable!
    All the best,
    Mischa.

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Britain
    Posts
    925

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Quote Originally Posted by lyndsayjenness
    Great topic as usual, Kelly!

    My boy is only one and a half, so we haven't dealt with him really having desires to do "girly" things yet. But, he has a couple baby dolls that he sort of likes. I have tried to encourage that more than he has actually shown interest in it, though. Oh! He loves shoes! Lol, seriously! I think he's going to be a shoe collector when he's older because he gets really excited about shoes. Not just his own, but everyones. Also, he loves to dance. I don't know think that's unusual for his age, for boys or girls, but I am probably going to put him in dance classes when he turns two. It's one of the only physical activites they have for such young children, and I think he'll love it. My husband is totally on board. Contrastingly, I have a nephew who is nine months younger than Dash (Chris' brothers son) and my BIL doesn't want him to have anything to do with girly things. He has him playing with hockey pucks and stuff like that, and discourages anything feminine. I think that's a combo of him having 2 daughters first and always wanting a little hockey players. My BIL is really not a macho type of guy at all, so it's a little surprising. My other BIL is a hunter, and he trapped a fox once when my nephew was about 9, he had him help him skin it and all of that. It was obvious that my nephew wasn't comfortable with that, but his dad wants him to be tough. He's a great artist and his dad won't let him take art class, makes him pay baseball instead which he has no interest in. Their girls of course are allowed to play sports AND do artistic things, definite double standard. My plan is to let Dash choose his own interests and activites and whatnotl I feel really blessed that my husband feels the same way about that and isn't afraid of stereotypically feminine things.
    Lyndsay, I think you have a great attitude. I don't understand all of these double standards people have, with girls heralded when they do something 'masculine', joining a football (soccer) team or some such, but then boys are sneered at for doing something 'girly' like dance. Attitudes do seem to be improving, though - one family I know gave a little baby doll to their son when they were expecting a second child.

    Also, my nephew (2 years old) really loves shoes, too. He takes great care choosing his shoes every day (which are basically all the same, just in different colours!), and as I get to play the role of glamorous aunt, he loves inspecting my shoes and jewellery whenever he sees me. Actually, I think it's probably good for sensory developmental, as he likes to touch my shoes and feel the different materials - suede, canvas, leather, patent leather.

    Auburn

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    327

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    I'm another male nameberry fan. Anyway, my son is actually very into typically masculine things right now (getting very much into sports even though he's only five), which is probably because of my partner Derrick who's into sports and more masculine pursuits lol. Our oldest daughter is also into sports, but our youngest is more into baby dolls and playing house and dress-up than the older two ever were. We definitely encourage all our kids to at least try as many different activities as they want, whether the activity is typically "male" or "female." I think that's really important, especially since my parents definitely tried to push sports on me and my brother (total non-athletes) and not my (now athletic) sisters.
    Proud father of Camille (8), Zachary (6), Laura (4), Juliet and Benjamin (6 months).

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    410

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Not a mom (yet) so I cant say anything from experience, only my intentions.

    I have two older brothers and I am not a girly girl. I wanted cars and lego's and a skateboard, ... from santaclaus but I only got dolls and stuff. I did like barbies and dolls and playing with my toykitchen, i loved it, but i also loved to play with my brothers toycars.

    This is the reason I dont want to force anything on my childeren. I dont care if my boy wants to dance, nor do i care if my daughter wants to play soccer. All I care about is if they are happy. Thats why I dont want to know the sex up front, i dont want a pink room for a girl or a blue one for a boy.

    I, however, will accurage my children to go into some kind of hobby. Ill let them dance (if they show interest that is!), play a musical instrument, go to soccer, volleybal or tennis, ... tryouts, ride horse, go to the local yought club (? is that a word, just a club where you play games and such). But if they dont like it (and tried for serious) they dont have to to that.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •