Names Searched Right Now:
Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 5 of 34
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,439

    Boys who like "girly" things

    Once again, although I'm not a mom (and I'm a guy for that matter) I thought of another good topic to discuss. Most of us know in the naming sphere about the double standard when it comes to cross-gender names and how it's reflected in other aspects as well with girls often being given more leeway with cross-gender behavior than boys. Although I was pretty much not interested in more feminine things myself, I think it's great for parents to let their sons explore their interests in such areas if that's what he wants to do. What I'm looking is if any of you Nameberryites have any boys that like to engage in "less-than-masculine" activities, likes looks that are considered "feminine" (e.g. long hair, sometimes wears "girl's" clothes, etc.), etc. and you support those interests (rather than try to make him act stereotypically)? Let's help break this stereotype that constrains many boys!

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    OC, Califonia
    Posts
    2,851

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Great topic as usual, Kelly!

    My boy is only one and a half, so we haven't dealt with him really having desires to do "girly" things yet. But, he has a couple baby dolls that he sort of likes. I have tried to encourage that more than he has actually shown interest in it, though. Oh! He loves shoes! Lol, seriously! I think he's going to be a shoe collector when he's older because he gets really excited about shoes. Not just his own, but everyones. Also, he loves to dance. I don't know think that's unusual for his age, for boys or girls, but I am probably going to put him in dance classes when he turns two. It's one of the only physical activites they have for such young children, and I think he'll love it. My husband is totally on board. Contrastingly, I have a nephew who is nine months younger than Dash (Chris' brothers son) and my BIL doesn't want him to have anything to do with girly things. He has him playing with hockey pucks and stuff like that, and discourages anything feminine. I think that's a combo of him having 2 daughters first and always wanting a little hockey players. My BIL is really not a macho type of guy at all, so it's a little surprising. My other BIL is a hunter, and he trapped a fox once when my nephew was about 9, he had him help him skin it and all of that. It was obvious that my nephew wasn't comfortable with that, but his dad wants him to be tough. He's a great artist and his dad won't let him take art class, makes him pay baseball instead which he has no interest in. Their girls of course are allowed to play sports AND do artistic things, definite double standard. My plan is to let Dash choose his own interests and activites and whatnotl I feel really blessed that my husband feels the same way about that and isn't afraid of stereotypically feminine things.
    Proud mama to two sweet boys:

    Dashiell David Rowe
    and
    Flynn William Warfield


    "Real babies are more difficult than ideas of babies... Or even pictures of babies."
    -James Franco

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    15,300

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Oh, am I glad we have a male Nameberry. It's great to have a male world view. Personally, I really get depressed with the gender issues that still plague our society in the 21st century. It begins before we're born. Alot of parents want to know the gender of their baby so they can "plan" the baby's room and clothing (eg. blue for boys and pink for girls). Yuck! I've never liked pink in my life. Just give me something yellow or green and I'll be happy. Even when one visits a toy store the genders have their own sections: guns and action figures for boys and dolls and arts and crafts for girls. Makes me crazy! I know boys and girls are different and have certain strengths due to genetics but I really wonder how much these differences are taught or learned over childhood. There is a double standard for baby names as well. Once the girls take over a boys name (eg. Beverley, Evelyn and Dorian were once boys names), these names no longer appeal to parents naming their sons. Boys names are dwindling fast and I think that's why the old classics like Jacob, Michael and William are so popular. Parents of daughters have alot more choices and can be more imaginative when naming girls. Unfortunately, the pattern has been set and boys names are diminishing. I have to stop now. I'm getting ticked off.
    All the best,
    Mischa.

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    145

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Jackobeam is a male nameberry too!

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,439

    Re: Boys who like "girly" things

    Has anyone noticed that those who would be willing to name their sons something unisex often also are more open on letting them explore cross-gender things more freely, while those who believe in the double standard that has been going on tend to think the same way with their kids' "gender freedom"?

    Mischa: Don't feel ticked off; things appear to be slowly but surely shifting (for example while fewer babies are being given the top names now than a couple of decades ago for both genders the "conformity curve" has fallen faster for boys in recent years). While the names you mentioned (except for Dorian, which I still consider perfectly usable for boys) are probably too far gone at this point, today's unisex picks like Avery and Riley are remaining fairly steady for boys despite rising for girls. Some that were popular for girls a generation or two ago which now sound dated on the girl's side like Kelly or Robin still stand a chance in my opinion for boys (as they fall faster for girls than boys the gender ratio gradually narrows for them). The same also applies to the topic of this post: While the double standard is still very much alive, today's new generation of parents is gradually becoming more open to wider freedom of gender roles for boys (especially the fathers, who have tended in the past to be the vetoers of their sons engaging in "feminine" pursuits).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •