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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    751

    Re: Some of the meanings are wrong

    I've noticed mistakes in your entries for Arwen and Broderick.

    For Arwen you have:

    Origin: Welsh
    Meaning: "noble maiden"

    This is a misnomer. Arwen in Welsh and the Arwen in the invented language of Tolkien, Sindarin, are two distinct names.

    Arwen in Sindarin comes from /ar/ 'noble' and /wen/ 'maiden'
    Arwen in Welsh comes from /gwen/ 'fair, white, blessed' with /ar/ as an intensifying prefix.

    The entry should either read:

    Origin: Sindarin
    Meaning: "noble maiden"

    or

    Origin: Welsh
    Meaning: "very fair, very blessed"


    Also, Broderick is not related to the Scandinavian name Broder. It is from the Welsh surname Broderick from 'Ab Roderick' = "son of Roderick" or "son of Rhydderch" (as Roderick is the Anglicised form of Rhydderch).
    The 'ab' or 'ap' meaning 'son of' (like the Gaelic 'Mac' or 'Mc') in Welsh became contracted and the 'a' dropped, turning to Broderick.

    The same thing can be seen in other Welsh surnames like Bowen (ab Owen), Bevan (ab Evan), Prichard (ap Richard), Price (ap Rice - old anglicisation of Rhys), Powell (ap Howell)
    Trends, styles and quirks of British names:
    www.britishbabynames.com

  2. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,803

    Re: Some of the meanings are wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by elea
    I've noticed mistakes in your entries for Arwen and Broderick.

    For Arwen you have:

    Origin: Welsh
    Meaning: "noble maiden"

    This is a misnomer. Arwen in Welsh and the Arwen in the invented language of Tolkien, Sindarin, are two distinct names.

    Arwen in Sindarin comes from /ar/ 'noble' and /wen/ 'maiden'
    Arwen in Welsh comes from /gwen/ 'fair, white, blessed' with /ar/ as an intensifying prefix.

    The entry should either read:

    Origin: Sindarin
    Meaning: "noble maiden"

    or

    Origin: Welsh
    Meaning: "very fair, very blessed"


    Also, Broderick is not related to the Scandinavian name Broder. It is from the Welsh surname Broderick from 'Ab Roderick' = "son of Roderick" or "son of Rhydderch" (as Roderick is the Anglicised form of Rhydderch).
    The 'ab' or 'ap' meaning 'son of' (like the Gaelic 'Mac' or 'Mc') in Welsh became contracted and the 'a' dropped, turning to Broderick.

    The same thing can be seen in other Welsh surnames like Bowen (ab Owen), Bevan (ab Evan), Prichard (ap Richard), Price (ap Rice - old anglicisation of Rhys), Powell (ap Howell)
    Fascinating! We'll adjust.
    Pam Satran
    Nameberry

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    751

    Re: Some of the meanings are wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by pam

    Fascinating! We'll adjust.
    Glad to be of help! :)

    Also, I should probably mention that while in Wales Arwen is feminine, Arwyn (the masculine counterpart) has been used for boys -- both aren't very common, with the name Arwen recorded on approx 1,050 birth registrations (both first and middle names) and Arwyn on about 1,040, between 1915-2005 in England and Wales.
    Prior to 1915, Arwen was only recorded twice (in the 1837-1915 index) whereas Arwyn has just under 100 entries.
    Trends, styles and quirks of British names:
    www.britishbabynames.com

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1

    Re: Some of the meanings are wrong

    Darko is Slavic for "gift." It has absolutely no connection with the English word "dark."

    Also, your feedback@nameberry.com email doesn't seem to be working, as the email I sent there was returned.

  5. #19

    Re: Some of the meanings are wrong

    Hi there. Love your site! One quick note...

    Regarding the name SHOSHANA/SHOSHANAH: your site lists its meaning as "lily." This was the ancient Hebrew usage, but in modern Hebrew, Shoshanah means "rose." I'm 99% sure on this one, but any Israelis out there feel free to correct me.

    Also re: Shoshanah - your site lists SHOSHONE as a variation of SHOSHANAH. Actually, Shoshone is the name of a Native American tribe, and is no relation to the name Shoshanah at all! I only mention this because my own name is Shoshanah, and it's always been a pet peeve of mine when people mispronounce it as Shoshone (which happens a lot!). Not that I don't like the name Shoshone, mind you :), it just doesn't have anything to do with my name.

    Also just a note regarding some of the previous posts: it's great to get feedback from people about what names are actually used in which countries, and which names might get you funny looks if you were to travel to a specific place in the world. I'll use the Mignon/Mignonne example that an earlier poster cited above...While it's great to get that information, I still personally feel that it's up to individual parents to decide what is "appropriate" to name their own child: if you love the name Mignon for a girl, just be aware that it is more traditional to spell it Mignonne in the French language, and that someone named Mignon might get some funny looks when traveling in France/French Canada, due to the translation of her name in the native language. I'll also use the "Honey" example mentioned by the previous poster. While the thought of naming one's child "Honey" may appall some prospective parents who feel that it is an "inappropriate" name for a child, I'm sure there are others out there who think the name is, pardon the pun, sweet ;). One last word on this: as mentioned by another previous poster, there will always be homonyms for many names in different languages. For example, when traveling in Indonesia, I was interested to learn that the word BABI meant "pig," and the word WANITA meant "girl." My traveling partner and I joked that it would be pretty funny for a couple named Bobby and Juanita to travel together to Indonesia. I mention this to illustrate the fact that, while Bobby and Juanita would not be appropriate names for Indonesian children, they are perfectly appropriate names for children in other countries.

    'Kay, that's all. Thanks again for the awesome site.

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