Names Searched Right Now:
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 6 to 10 of 37
  1. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    916
    I visited Germany in 2012 with some friends and we really enjoyed it. We went to Berlin and stayed on the outskirts. If you ever consider visiting Berlin, then I'd recommend the Richstag (have I spelt it correctly?) and Charlottensburg Palace. I'd like to visit Bavaria and am thinking about it for next year. My mother visited Bavaria in the 80s / 90s and she said that she liked it and that the landscape there is beautiful.
    I also know someone who comes from Germany and she's called Lea. I think used to live near Stuttgart - she has moved to England although is returning to Germany at the end of the summer, I think.

    That's all I can say really, since I don't know a lot of things about Germany.
    I'm a Teenberry who is mad about names, royals & history. I'm not expecting, just collecting names.

    Adelina Sophia ♕ Magdalena Élisabeth ♕ Isla Aveline
    Leo Xavier ♕ Alexander George ♕ Thomas Archie

    See my lists of: Girls names, Boys names and Combinations!

    Crushes: Charlene, Anneliese, Megan, Jean, Augustus and Adair
    GP Crushes: Welcome and Truman

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,384
    I have been to Germany on vacation several times and spent a year studying there, in Heidelberg. It is my "happy place". Sometimes I feel like it's my personal mission to be as positive about Germany as possible because ignorant people *always* seem to say things like, "You lived in Germany? Are there lots of Nazis there?" *facepalm*

    What's it like is a big question. Compared to America (or Canada), it's definitely a lot older! My university was the oldest in the country, founded in 1386. Even in the newer cities, there are often churches and buildings that are much older than anything you would find on this side of the pond. It's also very clean and organized. Whereas in Paris, it's not uncommon to see loads of trash on the ground, in German cities, people generally keep things clean, and they recycle much more than in the US. One of the things that make me smile when I arrive in a German city is how the bike lanes and pedestrian walks are clearly marked, and people obey traffic signals. That's another thing; a lot of people bicycle there, much more than in the US or Canada. The pace of life is different. Whereas in North America (at least where I live), there is such pressure to be open 24/7, in Germany it's not uncommon for, say, the university cashier's office to only be open for a couple of hours a day - kind of a pain when you're working around your class schedule to pick up your scholarship! Where I lived, almost all stores were closed on Sundays and closed by 5PM on Saturday, so if you needed groceries, you had to go to the store at the train station. Bakeries and restaurants, however, were still open. I loved that aspect of life; people genuinely seemed to take time off on the weekends and rest. I found the same was true about being sick. At home, when I wasn't feeling well, I felt like I needed to take medication and go about my daily routine. In Germany, when I wasn't feeling well, even my professors told me to stay home and sleep it off. A friend told me, "What do you mean, you need to 'function'. You're not a machine."

    Childhood: Well, I've never been a child there, but school starts a bit later, like around age 6. Whereas people have a stereotype of German schools based on pre-WWI stories so they imagine Germans behaving like drill sergeants, that is not how it really is there. Kids play, ride bikes, etc. Schooling is a bit complicated; at around 10 (I think?) people decide which kind of high school they will attend; there is the Gymnasium which are more academic, Realschule which is in the middle, and Hauptschule, which is more technical/vocational. If you want to attend university, you have to go to a Gymnasium; however, you can attend a vocational school to learn a trade if you go to one of the other options. I may be slightly off, so please someone correct me if need be.

    Languages: Everyone under 50ish that I've I met in Germany speaks more than one language. Most Germans in university spoke near-perfect English, and also studied French or another language. Most people had traveled to other countries, even if it was just France or Switzerland. There was a lot more awareness of the world in general than I have found from my American friends (sorry to sound negative, but it's true; it's just an average, and I have met loads of Americans that know a lot about the world of course).

    Religious life: Germans on the whole are pretty secular. There are two state-supported churches: The Catholic Churche, and the Evangelische Church, which we would refer to as the Lutheran church. Traditionally, the north of the country was Lutheran and the south, particularly Bavaria, was more Catholic. People can choose to support one of those churches with their taxes, or they can choose not to support the church. As far as I've seen, however, most people don't attend church except on special occasions. I didn't find that religious traditions were as common as in, say, Italy. In the former East Germany, many people consider themselves non-religious. That said, there are also independent Christian churches that are growing. It's a long story for another day, but I actually became a Christian in Germany, and attended what is known as the Freie Evangelische Kirche or "free evangelical church", which basically means it is independent of the state, so not supported by tax money.
    .
    Miriam ~ Helena ~ Estella ~ Beatrice ~ Anastasia ~ Alice ~ Marilla ~ Sarah
    Paul ~ Wesley ~ Walter ~ Edmund ~ Isaac ~ Abram ~ Gabriel

    Trying for baby#1
    Avatar: Nathan Altman, Portrait of Anna Akhmatova

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,384
    Okay, wow, I've already said a lot, but I'll talk about stereotypes since you asked. Here are some common stereotypes and my response:

    Germans are always punctual. this is generally true. They are much more punctual than, say, my Brazilian friends. The trains and buses run on schedule. They also generally hold to their word. If a German friend says he will call you, he most certainly will.

    Germans are cold. I don't think this is true; it appears true in comparison with some parts of the US. It's true that people are much less likely to smile at you in public, and that servers in restaurants don't grin at you to welcome you; however, they are generally polite. Someone told me before I moved there that Germans in general don't seek out shallow friendships, but once you become friends, it's for life. I don't have too many German friends from my time there, but the ones I do have still send me Christmas cards even though we haven't seen eachother in 12 years. My best friend there bent over backwards to proof-read my essays and even let me stay in his apartment for my last night in the country because I had to vacate my room the day before.

    Germans like beer/drink a lot. Ummm, they do drink beer, but without fail, when I was living in Germany, if you saw anyone drunk on the street it was most likely a foreign exchange student! On the whole, people like their beer, but will take time to enjoy it rather than attempting to get wasted.

    German is a harsh language and people shout a lot. I don't really get this, but people mention it to me all the time. I think it's from peoples' main exposure to the language being through WWII films. People don't shout a lot, and I think the language is lovely.

    Germans wear Lederhosen. Not true! Mayyyyybe if they're in the south, and even then, only on very rare occasions. The only time I saw anyone in traditional "German" clothing was actually when I went to Salzburg, Austria, and I'm not sure if people were dressed up because it was Easter.

    Germans love David Hasselhoff. I'm not sure why people think this, but I've never met a young person who listens to David Hasselhoff's music.

    German has a lot of long, funny words. They do have a lot of long words, mainly because compound words are melded into one word, rather than using hyphens or putting the words side by side.

    Also, I found this fun link about German stereotypes: http://www.thelocal.de/galleries/lifestyle/1797/
    Miriam ~ Helena ~ Estella ~ Beatrice ~ Anastasia ~ Alice ~ Marilla ~ Sarah
    Paul ~ Wesley ~ Walter ~ Edmund ~ Isaac ~ Abram ~ Gabriel

    Trying for baby#1
    Avatar: Nathan Altman, Portrait of Anna Akhmatova

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,384
    Oh, yes, and me again! You asked about names. It is a generational thing, just like here, but you very, very rarely meet anyone with the names that North Americans think of as "German": Adelheid, Dietwald, Gertrude, etc. And you will likely never meet anyone named Adolf, unless he was born before the War. My close friend's German parents are named Klaus and Dörte, and we joke that they have classic names for middle-aged Germans.

    Names common in the grandparent generation, AKA those of my ex-step fathers' older relatives: Heinrich, Hans, Maria, Anna, Doris, Mannfred, Wolfgang.

    Names that were common among my classmates: Christian, Daniel, Alexander, Stefan/Stephan, Carsten, Andreas, Jens, Thomas, Markus, Martin, for guys; Claudia, Karin, Stefanie, Daniela, Kathrin or Katharina, Melanie, Sabina/Sabine for girls. Oddly enough, I had a close friend there named Cornelius whose roommate was also named Cornelius, but I don't know if that was a fluke or if it was actually a popular name in the 1970s.

    There is also a huge Turkish population, so you hear Turkish names like Achim or Mesut.

    I promise that's it from me. Please feel free to PM me with any questions. I'm a hopeless Germanophile who is just hoping to get back there one day soon!
    Last edited by maggiefromcanada; June 30th, 2014 at 01:35 PM.
    Miriam ~ Helena ~ Estella ~ Beatrice ~ Anastasia ~ Alice ~ Marilla ~ Sarah
    Paul ~ Wesley ~ Walter ~ Edmund ~ Isaac ~ Abram ~ Gabriel

    Trying for baby#1
    Avatar: Nathan Altman, Portrait of Anna Akhmatova

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cair Paravel :)
    Posts
    15,660
    Does anyone know the general consensus on the train system there? Because I've heard everything from it's fantastic to all Germans hate it and it's a good thing to blame if you're going to be late, lol.

    @honnepon - I think I honestly have very few stereotypes--I think a big chunk of my image for Germany (in the past, anyway) has been the whole Nazi stigma. I am not under any delusions that it's like that anymore, but I have such a strong impression on what Nazi Germany WAS that I don't really have any understanding of what modern-day Germany is, without all the hostility and evil of the Nazi era. I think I'm starting to form a good understanding of what it's like now, but I'm frustrated, because I feel like I really need to visit Germany to understand and be able to write a story about it, but that's just not feasible right now (unless somebody wants to give me several thousand dollars and a German translator, haha!). I also have the impression that Germans go around eating sausage and potatoes and drinking beer, and are rather harsh/severe as far as personalities go, but I know that's not right. I just feel like if I'm going to write a story that takes place in Germany and has a lot of German characters, I want to do the German culture justice. I am not sure I really have tons of stereotypes (or any conceptions of what Germany is period, honestly), but I don't want to just fill it in with a bunch of stereotypes or misconceptions, rather than understand what Germany is like. If that makes any sense at all.

    @maggieincanada - oh my goodness, I knew I should have PM'd you, too. hahaha! But this is good! Exactly what I needed. I know it was a really, really broad topic, but I really, really know very little, so I was just hoping people would grab hold of anything and just expand it for me. If I have more time this afternoon, I may PM you some questions.
    Last edited by ashthedreamer; June 29th, 2014 at 05:05 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •