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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Melbourne, Australia
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    I can't think of anyone I know with a very German sounding name except for my cousin Heidi. She's a year younger than me, and because we grew up together, I don't find the name strange for an English speaking child. (I live in Australia, btw.)

    Oh, that reminds me, I do know an Ingrid, but she is an older lady who was born in Holland and came over here when she was quite young.
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  2. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    That's interesting. I can see what you mean, people just don't always know the trends in the other country or language. My family and social circle include a lot of immigrants, who have names that are very dated or clunky- e.g. I know teenagers/young adults named Joyce, Karen, Sharon, and Eunice. A lot of their parents don't speak English very well and/or weren't aware of the connotations behind the names. This also leads to names like Genuine or Happy.

    opheliaflora- What are some names commonly used in Germany today that feel very German and/or get minimal use in other countries?
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  3. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    310
    From my understanding, most German-Americans are descendants of people who immigrated from Germany in the 19th century and the majority speak English as their first language rather than German. Thus there is a cultural and linguistic barrier barrier between German-Americans and modern-day German citizens, and so German-Americans may not have any knowledge that in Germany these names are perceived as out-dated or unfashionable.

    I have also noticed that German-Americans on Nameberry who want to honour their heritage often look for names that are considered very "German" in the USA, i.e. Gretchen, Hans and their ilk, rather than names such as Anna or Maria which despite being extremely common and traditional in Germany aren't perceived as German in the US. Often the very "German" names are names that are stereotypically associated with German speakers in films and media (e.g. names from The Sound of Music).
    Last edited by lumen; June 25th, 2014 at 07:55 AM.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Germany
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliviasarah View Post
    I've heard the comment that Ottilie/Ottilia are dated in Germany too? Is that correct?
    I'v never heard of an Ottilie here but I think it would fall under the category of never being uber-popular so it can't be really dated. You might find a few Ottilies of any age here but I suppose more older ones than younger ones. Might be interesting to mention that Ottilie is pronounced O-tee-lyeh here.
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  5. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Germany
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    Quote Originally Posted by emiliana View Post
    Gemma, Rhiannon and Bronwyn are examples of dated Australian names that I see on American berries lists, I know 5 Gemma's the oldest born in the 80's and the youngest in 2004, Rhiannon made the top 100 in the 90's and Bronwyn in the 50's, 60's and 70's. I think it just depends on the person to many Australian's Heidi is a cutesy name like Ellie, Lily and Elsie while having literacy cred. Mathilda is exactly like Matilda and is the middle name of a half Australian Danish princess (One of the most publicised royals here).
    I think what you said is interesting as I wouldn't say that Gemma or Rhiannon are very Australian or British or American names, they're just popular or dated in these countries. That concept I would compare to the European Elisabeth. It might me popular in Belgium or Denmark (no idea if that's actually the case) but it's quite uncommon here. I wouldn't categorize the name as German, just a variant that is used in other languages as well.
    But Heidi at 88. Wow!
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