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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    856
    I can't think of anyone I know with a very German sounding name except for my cousin Heidi. She's a year younger than me, and because we grew up together, I don't find the name strange for an English speaking child. (I live in Australia, btw.)

    Oh, that reminds me, I do know an Ingrid, but she is an older lady who was born in Holland and came over here when she was quite young.
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  2. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,513
    That's interesting. I can see what you mean, people just don't always know the trends in the other country or language. My family and social circle include a lot of immigrants, who have names that are very dated or clunky- e.g. I know teenagers/young adults named Joyce, Karen, Sharon, and Eunice. A lot of their parents don't speak English very well and/or weren't aware of the connotations behind the names. This also leads to names like Genuine or Happy.

    opheliaflora- What are some names commonly used in Germany today that feel very German and/or get minimal use in other countries?
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  3. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Germany
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    2,783
    Quote Originally Posted by oliviasarah View Post
    I've heard the comment that Ottilie/Ottilia are dated in Germany too? Is that correct?
    I'v never heard of an Ottilie here but I think it would fall under the category of never being uber-popular so it can't be really dated. You might find a few Ottilies of any age here but I suppose more older ones than younger ones. Might be interesting to mention that Ottilie is pronounced O-tee-lyeh here.
    Polly

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  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Germany
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    2,783
    Quote Originally Posted by emiliana View Post
    Gemma, Rhiannon and Bronwyn are examples of dated Australian names that I see on American berries lists, I know 5 Gemma's the oldest born in the 80's and the youngest in 2004, Rhiannon made the top 100 in the 90's and Bronwyn in the 50's, 60's and 70's. I think it just depends on the person to many Australian's Heidi is a cutesy name like Ellie, Lily and Elsie while having literacy cred. Mathilda is exactly like Matilda and is the middle name of a half Australian Danish princess (One of the most publicised royals here).
    I think what you said is interesting as I wouldn't say that Gemma or Rhiannon are very Australian or British or American names, they're just popular or dated in these countries. That concept I would compare to the European Elisabeth. It might me popular in Belgium or Denmark (no idea if that's actually the case) but it's quite uncommon here. I wouldn't categorize the name as German, just a variant that is used in other languages as well.
    But Heidi at 88. Wow!
    Polly

    looking for second middles:
    Rose Wilhelmina / Penelope Ada / Flora Charlotte

    already loving:
    Elliott Victor Frederick / Ophelia Rosalind Clara / Hugo Kasimir Edmund / Arthur Caspian Henry

    when they're little:
    Rosie, Pippa, Fleur, Ottie, Elphie, Huey & Artie


  5. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,291
    I think Wolfgang, Heidi, and Gretchen are all great names. I personally have seriously considered Wolfgang, at least as a middle name. I think maybe we like names like this because they SOUND "German" to us. The truth is, of course, that much of Europe is becoming sort of standardized in their naming, swapping names here and there, I guess. But, I think it would be a shame to lose these distinctive names altogether.

    And come on, Wolfgang's just a badass name!

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