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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    229
    US Berry Here

    Preppy names here would be a lot of surname names (esp ones ending in -ton for boys) and unisex names. Also, for girls, long, elegant, classic names with unisex nicknames. Everything spelled right (no 'y's place randomly, etc).
    Some examples:
    Mackenzie - boy
    Alistair - boy
    August - boy
    Benton - boy
    Ashton - boy
    Kenton - boy
    Atherton - boy
    Bailey - boy
    Parker - girl
    Darcy - girl
    Samantha, nn Sam - girl
    Jessica, nn Jessie - girl
    Josephine, nn Joey - girl
    Daniell(e/a), nn Danny - girl
    Charlotte, nn Charlie - girl
    Alexandr(i)a, nn Alex - girl

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    833
    We have similar sorts of schools in the US, but they are pretty concentrated on the east coast, and it's only the really wealthy that use them. This is based on my understanding of public schools in the UK anyway. Most upper middle class go to public schools (that is I guess in UK terms a state school) and some to private schools but most of them aren't really like the UK system. Most of them are religious based, even if they've moved away from religious education, that's how they started. So to most Americans I think, preppy tends to be associated with a particular east coast wealthy life style. So naming wise it would be similar to the names popular in Oxford, I think. There is a lot of carry over from the UK idea of preppy names. I'm not actually sure what names they are using, I'm middle class so I don't hang out with wealthy people, but I imagine Nameberry's Yupster lists would be close.
    http://nameberry.com/list/218/Yupste...Names-for-Boys
    http://nameberry.com/list/217/Yupste...ames-for-Girls
    Last edited by anaxandra; April 17th, 2014 at 02:41 PM.

  3. #10
    I'm from the USA and preppy names are normally set by popular students names. When I was in Highschool it was Stephanie, Whitney, Lauren and Jennifer. I think preppy is more an attitude or social class than a name style. I always assumed preppy and posh were similar.
    Theodore Arthur

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,707
    Quote Originally Posted by anaxandra View Post
    We have similar sorts of schools in the US, but they are pretty concentrated on the east coast, and it's only the really wealthy that use them. This is based on my understanding of public schools in the UK anyway. Most upper middle class go to public schools (that is I guess in UK terms a state school) and some to private schools but most of them aren't really like the UK system. Most of them are religious based, even if they've moved away from religious education, that's how they started. So to most Americans I think, preppy tends to be associated with a particular east coast wealthy life style. So naming wise it would be similar to the names popular in Oxford, I think. There is a lot of carry over from the UK idea of preppy names. I'm not actually sure what names they are using, I'm middle class so I don't hang out with wealthy people, but I imagine Nameberry's Yupster lists would be close.
    http://nameberry.com/list/218/Yupste...Names-for-Boys
    http://nameberry.com/list/217/Yupste...ames-for-Girls
    Haha. Not everyone in Oxford is posh because of the University hahaha!
    Please contribute to the Nameberry Combination Charts by adding your names to this thread. I would really appreciate your help! http://http://nameberry.com/nametalk...tistics/page19

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    833
    Quote Originally Posted by whirligig View Post
    Haha. Not everyone in Oxford is posh because of the University hahaha!
    I'm just saying that the names there would be the same sort of names that would be considered preppy here. (and I'm using it as an example only because I know about the names there from the study) In the US there isn't as much of a class divide in naming styles, I think, the wealthy and middle class tend to name pretty similarly at least. The biggest divide is locational. If you live in the west or west coast or south, for instance. (Well and also race and religion but I don't really want to talk about that here)

    Just take a look at the maps that are shown on Baby Name Wizard for the names Maxwell (kind of yupster) vs Harper (g) (surnames, popular in western states and the south).
    Last edited by anaxandra; April 17th, 2014 at 02:55 PM.

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