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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cair Paravel :)
    Posts
    15,842
    @pansy - I had thought of that, honestly, and I was going to do that when I first started, but I couldn't find anything that worked well for a child--plus, it has to be translated into Spanish for her (I took Spanish for four semesters in college, but I'm by no means fluent. I can recognize a word here and there, but especially now that I'm learning French, I don't feel very competent writing to her in her own language, lol), and so I felt it might lose the effect to have this cute little card with a short-and-sweet message from her sponsor, and then for the part she got in her own language to be on this plain, boring white piece of paper? I don't know, it just didn't seem like it would be as fun in translation.

    @triss - I have thought of writing her a little story, or something, honestly, but I wasn't sure if it'd be odd? I have to tell a story to the children of my church a couple times a year for the children's programming, so I have a couple stories in reserve, but I wasn't sure if it'd be weird to just belt out a story in the midst of a letter asking her how she was, etc...
    Ashley
    twenty-something namenerd and aspiring novelist

    Isabelle Aurora Grace | Caleb Elias Joseph | Arianne Eleanor Daisy | Everett Joshua Charles
    Olivia Wren Camille | Jack August Wilder | Violet Ophelia Claire | Avery Ian George

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,636
    Do they not sell greeting cards in Spanish in your area? If not, I'm sure you could order some online. Or just do blank cards that have pretty pictures on the front, that way you can just write the message inside in Spanish yourself (online translators are great for this). You could also make the cards yourself. Craft stores sell kits if you haven't done it before. That way you're sending her something personal that you made.

    *Postcads from your city/state/country would also be good. That way she can see pictures of your native country and they're small, so it's something that she could easily carry around with her and show people.
    Last edited by pansy; March 13th, 2014 at 08:54 AM.

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,465
    Des idées:

    Si tu sais un personne qui parle espagnol, tu peux composer un message en anglais et se demander de l'écrire sur une carte.

    J'ai un cousin qui a cinq ans, et elle aime des histoires beaucoup, spécialement des histoires au sujet de princesses et des choses comme ça. (Elle est totalement une "girly girl".) Si tu peux envoyer des livres- des livres pour enfants sont normalement petits, moins qu'un huitième d'un pouce- mon cousin aime des livres Disney et Rainbow Magic (il semble qu'il y a des livres Rainbow Magic en espagnol http://tinyurl.com/k9uar8k). Elle aime des filmes aussi- dernièrement son favori est Frozen. Si tu pense que Isabel a l'opportunité de regarder des filmes et programmes de télé, tu peux demander ses favoris.

    Ecrire comment tu as été et sa vie quand tu as eu cet âge est intéressant. Se demander au sujet de ses activités ("a day in the life of"). Ses jouets/possessions/vêtements favoris, comment est-ce que sa chambre est décorée, ses amis et instituteurs, son anniversaire (et alors s'envoyer quelque chose spéciale si possible). Qu'est-ce qu'elle veux devenir quand elle est une adulte. Des autres espoirs pour l'avenir.

    Et tu peux écrire les histoires toi-même sur un pièce de papier sépare.
    ~Love names, literature, royals and horses~ <3

    Favourite names:
    Girls: Azalea, Cordelia, Elizabeth, Rosalind, Portia, Felicity, Juliet, Scarlett
    Boys: Fitzwilliam, Sebastian, Percival, Prospero, Orlando, Darcy

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    155
    As you mentioned, letters make them feel special and add the personal touch that cards would lack.
    One small girl I knew in Africa showed me a picture from her sponsor. I was shocked to see that it was a picture of the family in swimsuits. This was sent to a village child who may have never even seen a woman wearing pants! Every girl she knows wears dresses and every woman she knows wears two or three skirt (or equivalent) layers that reach til her ankles. I was dismayed to see such cultural insensitivity on the part of the sponsor. But I'm sure you are more careful than that, you seem thoughtful of others. And I know nothing about Peruvian culture. It seems that cultural differences would make it more difficult to find subject matter for writing.
    Forty-something mom to three teenage girls and an eleven-year-old boy
    Foster mom to two sweet sisters born Aug 2011 and Sept 2012 and another wee girl born Aug 2013

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cair Paravel :)
    Posts
    15,842
    Oh, my, yes, that is terrible! I'm not familiar with Peruvian culture in specific, but I've been to Central/South America twice for mission trips through my church, and high school (Honduras and Brazil), so I know how culture is so jarringly different from here and there. I've tried to latch onto things I know we can both relate to--like the beach, since it sounds like she lives pretty close (although I can't tell for sure. She lives in San Mateo, and any map I've seen of Peru with San Mateo highlighted doesn't seem to indicate it's very close to the Pacific Ocean at all? Maybe about 30 miles or so?), and such. But I've tried to avoid talking about technology like phones and iPods, TVs, etc., because I am not sure what's available to her. She's said that she likes watching movies, but I also know that when I was in Honduras, people were living in homes built out of mud with mud floors and ovens put together by scrap found here and there and the level of poverty and need just made me want to cry, and yet the kids were sitting on the floor, and you could see them through the cavity in the mud wall where the door should be that they're just watching TV. It horrified my mom. I was only 11 when I was in Honduras, so a lot of what I remember is from her observations, other than some of my interactions with the local kids, and playing at the pool, etc.

    I hadn't even thought about modesty because I dress modestly for American standards, and most of the Hondurans and Brazilians I came across weren't dressed any more modestly than I would dress on a regular day, but I can see how that would be important in Africa!

    Lauren, merci pour tes propositions! Je ne sais pas si Isabel a une télévision? Elle a parlée que elle aime les films, mais la condition de vie au Pérou est très mauvaise. Ils construisent leur maisons avec des déchets, si je ne sais pas comment ils peuvent acheter une télévision? Je peux envoyer un livret par courrier, mais pas un livre. Le "livre" j'ai envoyée était practiquement un livret. Dix pages, ou plus. Peut-être, je peux écrire un autre avec photos?

    Il y a un homme à mon église qui parle espagnol--peut-être je peux parler à lui?

    Ta cousine semble adorable, au fait! Comme deux filles à mon église, haha.
    Ashley
    twenty-something namenerd and aspiring novelist

    Isabelle Aurora Grace | Caleb Elias Joseph | Arianne Eleanor Daisy | Everett Joshua Charles
    Olivia Wren Camille | Jack August Wilder | Violet Ophelia Claire | Avery Ian George

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