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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    357

    Apheline/Aphelinia?

    I came across old birth records and it had these names on it: Apheline/Aphelinia
    Does anyone know much about them and what do you think of them? How is it pronounced? Af-eh-leen?
    Tcc

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    509
    This reminds me of the names of my French Canadian ancestors - almost but not quite like a more typical name (Domithilde instead of Domitille, Josephte instead of Josephe ... This one almost looks like Apolline). For all of those I wonder if it is the result of a change in spelling conventions, an older or regional form of the name, or what.

    My guesses are a variant form of Apolline, a take on the word Apfel, or a relative of the surname Aphel. The words aphelia and aphelion might be related, but they seem like odd name fodder. Hope someone knows!
    Last edited by isolieth; February 25th, 2014 at 09:52 PM.
    Girls:
    Nickname-able: Susanna, Johanna, Paloma, Lucille, Harriet, Beatrix, Rosemary, Juniper, Marigold, Annabeth, Gwendolen, Kathleen, Tabitha
    Short and to-the-point: Flora, Jane, Laura, Anne, Cecile, Susan, Kaia

    Boys:
    So much easier: Hugh/Hugo, Wilfred, Basil, Augustin, Edmund, Arlo, Timothy, Frederick

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by isolieth View Post
    This reminds me of the names of my French Canadian ancestors - almost but not quite like a more typical name (Domithilde instead of Domitille, Josephte instead of Josephe ... This one almost looks like Apolline). For all of those I wonder if it is the result of a change in spelling conventions, an older or regional form of the name, or what.

    My guesses are a variant form of Apolline, a take on the word Apfel, or a relative of the surname Aphel. The words aphelia and aphelion might be related, but they seem like odd name fodder. Hope someone knows!
    After some research I finally came across the surname Apfel. Its means Apple.
    Last name origins & meanings:

    Last name: Apfel
    Recorded in many spellings and in several countries, this is a surname which wherever it is found, is of pre 7th century Old English, Old High German or Scandanvian origins. However spelt it would seem to derive from an early Saxon word 'apfal' or the Norse 'apall' or the Olde English 'oeppel' all mean apple and may make equal claim. The known surname spellings include Apple, Appel, Appell, Appleman (English), Apfel, Aphal, Aphale, Apfler, Apfelmann, Appelman, Eppel, Epel, Epelman (Dutch, German, Scandanavian and Askenasic), and German-Swedish compounds such as Appelberg and Applebaum. The surname has at least two possible origins. The more usual explanation is occupational or residential, and a description of a grower of apples, or who lives by an orchard. The second origin is much rarer and Welsh. It is a fused form of the medieval surname 'Ap Pella', meaning the son of Pella. The latter was a rare early personal name. whose meaning is uncertain. 'Ap-' is equivalent to the Gaelic 'Mac or Mc', and means 'son of'. Occupational surnames were amongst the earliest to be created, however they did not usually become hereditary unless a son followed a father into the same line of business. Examples of the surname recording taken from early surviving rolls and registers include Albert Epple of Heilbronn, Germany, in the year 1281, Nicholas Appleman in the Close Rolls of the city of London, in 1343, whilst Berthold Apfel is recorded as being a burger of Konstanz in 1437.

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Apfel#ixzz2uVDIcxh2

    Apfel (German for "apple") is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:
    Arthur Apfel (born 1922), British figure skater
    Holger Apfel (born 1970), leader of the National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) in Saxony
    Howard Apfel, (born 1962) American Rabbi and Cardiologist
    Iris Apfel (born 1921), American businesswoman, former interior designer, and fashion icon
    Kenneth S. Apfel (born 1948), 13th Commissioner of Social Security in the United States
    Oscar Apfel (1878–1938), American film actor, film director, screenwriter and film producer read more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apfel

    German: from Middle High German apfel ‘apple’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of the fruit.


    Read more on FamilyEducation: http://genealogy.familyeducation.com...#ixzz2uVBF49gF
    Tcc

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    509
    Awesome info! I could see this working for parents who aren't afraid of the uncommon. Apple would make a cute nickname, or Apha. The sounds all fit in with names that are in use today. I love Pomeline and that has the fruity meaning too, so I guess I have a fondness for those
    Girls:
    Nickname-able: Susanna, Johanna, Paloma, Lucille, Harriet, Beatrix, Rosemary, Juniper, Marigold, Annabeth, Gwendolen, Kathleen, Tabitha
    Short and to-the-point: Flora, Jane, Laura, Anne, Cecile, Susan, Kaia

    Boys:
    So much easier: Hugh/Hugo, Wilfred, Basil, Augustin, Edmund, Arlo, Timothy, Frederick

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    354
    I dont think i could use it - too close to Alpha, which is aggressive IMO.

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