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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    38
    Hmmm... It's not actually a kre8tiv spelling as it dates from the 12th century in Cornwall but the fact that you think it is speaks volumes Lawsonhaley! Thanks for your feedback Ashthedreamer - really helpful and nicely put. Cornish names are increasingly common but there are many that I wouldn't use, particularly for girls, as they involve lots of 'k' and 'z' parts which could give a similar impression. I'm not so worried about people thinking we're chavvy but more about how complicated the whole thing could get so maybe sticking to Vivian is a better option. My husband will be pretty upset I think but I have explained to him a couple of times now that when his great grandparents gave his (maternal) grandmother Vyvyan she wasn't competing with the Scottish/Italian double-barrelled surname as well, but a phonetic single surname.

    Now, if I had my druthers it'd be Vivien rather than Vivian but that may be a step too far for the old boy to deal with...

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cair Paravel :)
    Posts
    15,977
    Quote Originally Posted by tillytally View Post
    Hmmm... It's not actually a kre8tiv spelling as it dates from the 12th century in Cornwall but the fact that you think it is speaks volumes Lawsonhaley! Thanks for your feedback Ashthedreamer - really helpful and nicely put. Cornish names are increasingly common but there are many that I wouldn't use, particularly for girls, as they involve lots of 'k' and 'z' parts which could give a similar impression. I'm not so worried about people thinking we're chavvy but more about how complicated the whole thing could get so maybe sticking to Vivian is a better option. My husband will be pretty upset I think but I have explained to him a couple of times now that when his great grandparents gave his (maternal) grandmother Vyvyan she wasn't competing with the Scottish/Italian double-barrelled surname as well, but a phonetic single surname.

    Now, if I had my druthers it'd be Vivien rather than Vivian but that may be a step too far for the old boy to deal with...
    Oh, is it chavs that generally use misspellings/horrendous spellings over there? I'm not from the UK personally, but am fascinated by naming practices there. I have several British friends, and they've all tried to explain the whole chavvy-ness thing to me, but it's hard to relate to, since there's no real American equivalent. I was just thinking of the fact that (at least here, in the United States!) a good percentage of the people who use purposely misspelled names are either teen moms or the inner-city, lower-class, type people. From what I understand, chav doesn't automatically mean low class, but I guess I could see how some might see Vyvyan as chavvy, as well. Hmm.
    Ashley
    twenty-something namenerd and aspiring novelist

    Isabelle Aurora Grace | Caleb Elias Joseph | Arianne Eleanor Daisy | Everett Joshua Charles
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  3. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    545
    I usually would tell people to go with their hearts, but I think I'd listen to your head with this one. Vivian does still honor your grandmother, but will make life quite a bit easier for your little one. Although you know that your origins of Vyvyan are legit, if you go with it you (and your daughter) will have to develop a thick skin against people assuming you were being creative.

    I also find Vyvyan hard to read. The Vyvy sequence is hard on the eyes and it's hard to tell which one is a V and which one is a y, and the spelling also makes me wonder if I'm supposed to pronounce it more like VIVE-yan (rhymes with FIVE-man) or VIV-yan.

    I do hope that if you go with Vivian your husband isn't too let-down. It still is a lovely tribute to his grandmother. If you go with Vyvyan, just practice either not caring what people think, or develop a quick explanation, eg: "It's spelled Vyvyan. That's a Cornish spelling, and was her great-grandmother's name."
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  4. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    302
    Some people can be so harsh! I don't usually like the new spellings and alterations made to names but as mentioned, if it is a proper variant and one from another culture I think it might work. If you can get past the worrying about the spelling and judgement I think you'll come to the right decision about the name..also I think Vyv is just as cute as Viv. If Vyvyan honours the little one's grandmother's name and you like it, I say go for it. I have an uncommon name and an unpronounceable last name unless I am surrounded by Scots lol but it was never really an issue, I just got used to spelling out my name. I know it's unimaginable for some but it was honestly not that big a deal for me growing up so I don't imagine little Vyv will have a huge issue with it either. I like it and hope you choose the perfect name
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  5. #14
    I have to agree with the majority of posters and say to stick with Vivian! Vivien would be pretty too.

    Also, I think the best way to honor a family member by naming a child is to use a name that is slightly different from the family member. For example, if I were to name my daughter Isla, after my great-grandmother Ila Mae, I would use Isla as the spelling. It still honors a family member, but gives the child their own spin on the family name, and gives them a little more individuality. Just a thought!
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