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  1. #96
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    246
    In this country people tend to be conservative regarding names, and even though there are no laws which restrict parents' choice, most children are given names that would be regarded as uncontroversial and "normal". I would say that naming laws would likely be unnecessary in this country.
    I would say that it's similar here in Poland. We have naming laws, but many people narrow they choices even more than those laws would suggest! Choosing a perfectly "normal", but not popular name is quite often considered as "hurting a child".

    I don't agree with some of our naming laws — for example the one according to which a common noun can't be used as name. I like some of English word names and I don't really understand why Jagoda (Berry), Nadzieja (Hope), Róża (Rose), Kalina (Viburnum) — which are traditionally allowed — are in any way better than others would be. But, to be honest, even if word names would be legal, I rather wouldn't use them, living in Poland, because of peoples' reactions. I guess most of my favourite names (girls', especially) could be found weird by many...
    Dominika Elwira | 19 | Hufflepuff and proud of it!
    Aniela - Antonia - Celina - Eliza - Estera - Idalia - Kalina - Klara - Leonia - Marcela - Melania - Renata
    Bartosz - Franciszek - Gabriel - Ignacy - Julian - Michał - Rafał

  2. #98
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    326
    I don't really like the idea of naming laws, which may be because 1. I'm American, and I've never even heard of such a thing until recently, and 2. I'm not a huge fan of government intervention in any aspect of my life. Of course I hear a name sometimes and wish the parents had been told not to do it, but at the end of the day we still have full power over what we name our children. And honestly, a child is your responsibility entirely until they're of age, which does kind of make them yours. It's never really nice to think of a person as property, but I've always kind of felt like as a child I WAS my mom's property, since I had to do what she told me to do and what not.

    I can definitely see the pros of naming laws, though. Especially in countries where grammar and identity are more important than they are here in the US.
    Noah Thomas
    Milo Sebastian

    Violet Claire
    Arianne Elisabeth
    Grace Madeline



  3. #100
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    986
    I'm pretty damn libertarian, but some laws are necessary, and this is one. To an extent. My opinion is it should be used only in extreme cases. Just like the state should step in if/when parents are being douchebags and beating their kids or denying them life-saving medical care because Jesus, the state should step in if/when parents decide to name their kid Fartface Dumpsterbutt. Of course there's no way around the fact that it's a subjective thing. There's no way to make a list of acceptable and unacceptable names. But again I firmly believe stepping into sacred parenting territory like this should be limited to names that will cause the child undue hardship, like Adolf Whitenazi or Bucknasty Shart.

    (All of that was an excuse to make up hilarious names.)
    Mrs. H.
    Trying for our first.
    Boy Combos: Jack Gabriel Walker & Jonah Michael Whittaker
    David . Alexander (Andy) . Xavier . Abel . Edgar . Apollo . Thomas . Harry . Walter . Frederick

    Girl Combos: Clementine Mary Theresa . Cecelia Rose Elizabeth
    Gemma . Beatrice . Vesper . Stella . Claire . Diana . Gloria . Rosemary . Winter . Georgia . Grace . Judith . Corinne

    Avatar: Sarah Connor kicks ass.

  4. #102
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Danville, Tri-State Area
    Posts
    1,347
    I personally don't like strict naming laws. I do think there should be some restrictions for the sake of the child. Such as the poor kids named Princess (made top 1000) and Beautiful and even more for those named Prynscesse and Beeayutyfulle.
    You can call me Abby
    Competitive dancer, hopeful writer, sophomore in high school, and most importantly, name obsessed

    Dreaming of a future little...
    Miss Lila Romilly or Maeve Tallulah or Moira Seraphine or Sadie Calypso or Iris Magdelen
    Mister Carter Jameson or Jasper Elias or Leo Xavier or Archer Murray or Torin Matthias

    limits, like fear, are often just an illusion

  5. #104
    First of all, I think that there should be restrictions in order to prevent harm on babies named ie Apple or Google. I live in Germany and in my country there are naming laws, not very strict though but still existent.
    1. In Germany it is very important to be able to tell the person´s gender from their name. In other words the name should indicate the gender. Gender neutral names are rejected and you have to choose another one.
    2. You cannot use the names of places, objects of products (except the brand´s name is a real name, ie Mercedes)
    3. The Standesamt (the office of vital statistics in the area a baby is born) accepts or rejects the name you chose. So you may have to choose another name. Remember that in Germany each time you submit a name you pay (I don´t remember very well how much but I think 12.00E). When evaluating, the Standesamt refers to a book, something like The International Manual Of First Names if translated into English. They also consult foreign embassies for non-German names. Thus, most parents end up to more traditional choices.
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