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  1. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    672
    @casilda,

    Sorry, I missed your first comment linking to that article. It was a really interesting read, thanks. But I think that the author's point was that other than obscene names, most naming laws would not hold up. A court cannot refuse to allow a person to name a child Adolf Hitler, but then allow Winston Churchill, because doing so would be making a value judgment. Parents are allowed to raise their children to be neo-Nazis or Klan members in America.

    Prohibitions on accent marks and non-Roman letters made sense back when official documents were filled out by typewriter. But now everything is on computers, and it is certainly easy enough to render names in Cyrillic or Arabic or what have you in just a few keystrokes. There is no reason that names need to be in the Roman alphabet. There is certainly no reason to prohibit the use of accent marks or umlauts or other marks. The author even points out that the state maintains road signs including diacritical marks but doesn't allow diacritical marks to be used on birth certificates.

    I could see prohibitions on obscene names being upheld, that seems the most likely to hold up. But even that- it would have to be pretty universally understood to be obscene.

  2. #58
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    358
    Sure, we have naming laws. There's even a list of names. But honestly, they're very relaxed, when people apply for names - it was much stricter before. And you're allowed to name the kid after someone in the family, so if you have a grandma Caroline, kiddo is straight away allowed to be Caroline. (the letter C isn't in our alphabet)

    My friend was refused to name her son Noah - had to name him Nóa, our version. Only reason she wanted him to be Noah, is because she plans to move in two years.

    I hope I don't have to apply for Lydia, if I ever name my kid that... In the naming list, the name is written as Lýdia. I hate Lýdia...
    My future ladies:
    Lý, Matilda, Lydia, Píl, Elsa, Anja, Lovisa, Flykra, Annalisa, Elisabeth & Ró

    My future gentlemen:
    Ravnur, Oskar, Ùlvur & Linus


  3. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,657
    Australian naming laws here is the link

    http://www.lawbuddy.com.au/knowledge...-in-australia/
    Psalm 23

  4. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    US
    Posts
    300
    I like the idea of naming laws. There should be some restrictions to avoid an offensive or cruel name, especially since the parent(s) may not know the name they are giving may be offensive or cruel.

    US seems to care more about the rights of the parent than that of the child. Few would be willing to limit the freedom of parents to give a horrible name, despite what it could do to the child.
    Last edited by kakin; May 22nd, 2014 at 04:12 AM. Reason: privacy

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    2,366
    Quote Originally Posted by tarynkay View Post
    @casilda,

    Sorry, I missed your first comment linking to that article. It was a really interesting read, thanks. But I think that the author's point was that other than obscene names, most naming laws would not hold up. A court cannot refuse to allow a person to name a child Adolf Hitler, but then allow Winston Churchill, because doing so would be making a value judgment. Parents are allowed to raise their children to be neo-Nazis or Klan members in America.

    Prohibitions on accent marks and non-Roman letters made sense back when official documents were filled out by typewriter. But now everything is on computers, and it is certainly easy enough to render names in Cyrillic or Arabic or what have you in just a few keystrokes. There is no reason that names need to be in the Roman alphabet. There is certainly no reason to prohibit the use of accent marks or umlauts or other marks. The author even points out that the state maintains road signs including diacritical marks but doesn't allow diacritical marks to be used on birth certificates.

    I could see prohibitions on obscene names being upheld, that seems the most likely to hold up. But even that- it would have to be pretty universally understood to be obscene.
    Please pronouce Здравствуйте. In English since that's what we're typing in right now. If a name can't be spelled with the characters on our keyboards (except diacritical marks), they have no place as names where English is the overwhelmingly primary language. In English, since that's what most people in this country use, it should be written so people can actually pronounce it (Zdravstvujte). Thankfully, people whose primary languages are something other than English have enough sense to spell names in English so this isn't an issue.

    Yes, California shouldn't allow their signs to be printed with diacritical marks if they're not able to be used on birth certificates but that has nothing to do with the point I was trying to make.
    Current favorites:
    Cora . Louisa . Lydia . Mary

    My Adoption Journey

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