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View Poll Results: Which of these naming trends do you dislike?

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  • Nicknames given as legal first names

    38 23.31%
  • Parents insisting on only full name used

    14 8.59%
  • Surnames as first names

    31 19.02%
  • Place names

    23 14.11%
  • Word names (jewels, trees, plants, etc.)

    14 8.59%
  • Double/hyphenated middle names

    26 15.95%
  • Hard to spell/pronounce names

    62 38.04%
  • Male names for females

    81 49.69%
  • Made up or misspelled names

    133 81.60%
  • $ names like Cash, Chase, Royce

    71 43.56%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 1 to 5 of 22
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,541

    Which of these naming trends do you dislike (and why)?

    Please feel free to do poll and/or respond here.

    I am sure I missed a number of trends (they only allow 10 options on the poll too!).

    I am fine with most of these categories myself generally speaking.

    The only four that bother me:

    1) Names that look like this: Eilshg which I can't pronounce or say.
    2) Boys named Catherine or Sophia and girls named Michael and Charles.
    3) Names that are made-up or misspelled. With made-up, I see efforts at creativity and individuality at least, but spelling Brian Brain or Elsa L-SAAA or Tod Taod, no.
    4) Names that feel crass to me: car names (Royce), money (Cash), Wall Street (Chase) etc. Though a kid named Citroen... at least it's a cool word! (joke)
    Last edited by lesliemarion; February 2nd, 2014 at 03:29 PM.

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    St. Petersburg, Russia
    Posts
    2,435
    Nicknames as full names, boy names on girls and misspelled names.
    polina, nineteen
    french/russian/swedish living in st. petersburg, russia
    art history major, web developer



    clementine + ottoline + romilly + sybella + matilda
    wilhelmina + tallulah + marlowe + emiliana + saskia

    felix + sebastian + milo + oscar + fabian
    cosmo + archer + rufus + dashiell + caius

    { mommy to jagger the cat }

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,703
    The ones that annoy me are (no offence to anyone):
    Nicknames as legal full names- Only because a lot of the time they sound cute on a child, but not so much on an adult. I love Finn and Fae as nns, but I feel as if they sound a bit childish on an adult, or would only suit an adult with a certain personality.
    Surnames as first names- This really irritates me. I don't mind surnames that actually sound like first names, but most names ending in -son/ -an e.g. Anderson, Jackson, and Donovan, and really common surnames like Smith, are clearly surnames and, to me, just sound a bit wrong as first.
    Names like Cash etc.- Personally, I think they sound a bit tacky. Chase might be okay on a child or teenager.
    Also, depending on the name, I don't mind made up names or names that are spelled differently. I like Silas spelt Sylas, because I think it looks nicer, and it's not been altered too much. It's only if a name has 5 extra letters, or looks/ sounds ridiculous (if made up); it's actually quite annoying when people automatically disregard names straight away just because they're "made up". I've liked the name Saren, since I was 7 or 8, and I didn't even know it was made up until I looked it up and couldn't find the meaning etc. Imogen for example, one of the top names on Nameberry, was (unintentionally) made up.
    Parents insisting on using full name- It's okay when the child's younger, but ultimately it should be their choice to use their full name or a nn.
    I love double mn; you can use more of your fave names, and difficult to spell/ pronounce names are okay, as long as the pronunciation doesn't have to be taught to everyone you meet. As in, "It's said B as in baby, o as in orange" etc.
    Sorry for the ramble btw.
    Wholocked, history and chemistry loving teenberry (16).
    Hoping to be a mummy in the very distant future. Dreaming of...
    ✦ Pandora Valencia Fae ✧ Evanthe Lyra Annabeth ✦
    Little Misses
    ✧ Caspian Sherlock Walter ✦ Phoenix Arthur Blaise ✧
    Mister Men

    "'Mycroft' is the name you gave me; if you could possibly struggle all the way to the end."
    • Mycroft Holmes • Sherlock (BBC) • His Last Vow •

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,541

    I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by myosotis View Post
    The ones that annoy me are (no offence to anyone):
    Nicknames as legal full names- Only because a lot of the time they sound cute on a child, but not so much on an adult. I love Finn and Fae as nns, but I feel as if they sound a bit childish on an adult, or would only suit an adult with a certain personality.
    Surnames as first names- This really irritates me. I don't mind surnames that actually sound like first names, but most names ending in -son/ -an e.g. Anderson, Jackson, and Donovan, and really common surnames like Smith, are clearly surnames and, to me, just sound a bit wrong as first.
    Names like Cash etc.- Personally, I think they sound a bit tacky. Chase might be okay on a child or teenager.
    Also, depending on the name, I don't mind made up names or names that are spelled differently. I like Silas spelt Sylas, because I think it looks nicer, and it's not been altered too much. It's only if a name has 5 extra letters, or looks/ sounds ridiculous (if made up); it's actually quite annoying when people automatically disregard names straight away just because they're "made up". I've liked the name Saren, since I was 7 or 8, and I didn't even know it was made up until I looked it up and couldn't find the meaning etc. Imogen for example, one of the top names on Nameberry, was (unintentionally) made up.
    Parents insisting on using full name- It's okay when the child's younger, but ultimately it should be their choice to use their full name or a nn.
    I love double mn; you can use more of your fave names, and difficult to spell/ pronounce names are okay, as long as the pronunciation doesn't have to be taught to everyone you meet. As in, "It's said B as in baby, o as in orange" etc.
    Sorry for the ramble btw.
    about the parents insisting that the child is ONLY called by the whole name or by their nickname choice FOREVER.

    While I think it is fine for them to call Arabella Arabella, I don't actually think it's their business at all what other people call her. Ara, Belle, Bella, or even Plum. Most of my high school girlfriends had nicknames, many of which had nothing to do with their actual name or their parents: Jen, Wilt, Marbles, Kel, Treefrog, Denie... And only one of those lasted (Jen) so some parental relaxation would be a good idea.

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    192
    Absurdly violent, hyper-macho names: Wrecker, Breaker, Hunter. The only Hunter I know is a pretty disturbed and violent kid, which doesn't help.

    I don't take "Chase" as a money name. I think of it in the sense of pursuit--so more dashing than crass.

    I might like some made-up names, but misspelled is another matter.

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