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  1. #1

    need help naming my treasure

    So im gonna be a dad to a baby girl really soon but do not like the name the mom picked out

    She wants Rene Avery
    I dont like Rene

    I would like something with the meaning my treasure but would flow with the name Avery.

    I appreciate all inputs

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    991
    What about Avery Rene? I think this sounds lovely. That said, I know one of the cutest little girls name Rene. She has blonde hair and rosy cheeks and huge brown eyes. It has made the name quite charming for me.

    I'm actually having a hard time thinking up names that would flow well with the mn Avery. I'm sure you'll get some input and I'll be back after I think a bit.

    Sina means treasure and actually pairs nicely: Sina Avery. There is a feature on the site that lets you search by meaning. I didn't find much for Treasure, but "Gift" gave some options.

    http://nameberry.com/search/?gender=...erivation=gift
    Last edited by aym; January 30th, 2014 at 04:33 AM.

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    364
    Alright, this may be a stretch but the name meaning "My treasure" could extend to gift or God's gift or Gift from God. With that said, you have opened up your options. I will also give the site to the name so that you can read verify on the name option if you so choose it, as well as the owner of the site will answer any additional questions for you. I have had her personally work with me.

    Godiva/Godyfu - pronounced God-yee-va - means God's gift

    Godiva
    The extremely rare and semi-mythical name of an Anglo-Saxon heroine.



    Origin:

    From Old English name Godgyfu, composed of the elements god and gyfu "gift" -- "god's gift". Godiva is the Latinised form of the name.

    Usage:

    The Anglo-Saxon name Godgyfu / Godgifu is found on some of the few noble women women who are listed in surviving texts. It was pronounced god-yee-vuh (the stress usually falling on the first syllable, the 'f' becoming 'v' when between two vowels and the 'g' becoming a 'y' when followed by a front vowel). The name was often found latinised as Godiva on official documents

    The most famous bearer of the name is Lady Godiva (Countess Godifu), wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia who is said to have famously rode "naked" through the streets of Coventry to save the people from harsh taxation. Historians believe that "naked" refers not to her riding with no clothes on but taking off her finery, uncovering her hair, and wearing a simple shift -- removing all trace of her aristocracy.

    The name is extremely rare in usage. Six girls were given the name between 1840-1920. Three between 1960-1990. And eight children were given the name between 2000-2005.

    Famous Bearers:

    There are a few notable Anglo-Saxon noble women recorded with the name Godifu/Godiva:

    * Godgifu (d.c1080) wife of Leofric.
    * Princess Godgifu (1004-c1047) was the daughter of King Aethelred and Queen Emma, sister to King Edward the Confessor.
    * Godgifu was a wife of Siward, Earl of Northumbria.

    Tennyson wrote a poem titled "Godiva" after the countess of Mercia. There is also a brand of chocolate that bears her name and image.
    Variants:

    Godgyfu , Godgifu, Goda, Godife, Godgyue (Anglo-Saxon)

    Pronunciation:

    god-Ī-və (UK) god-eev-a (France, Spain) [key]

    Possible diminutives:

    Diva, Gida, Ida, Iva, Ivy, Viva, Vy

    Names with Same Meaning:

    Devdan Dorothea Dorothy Mattaniah Matthew Nathanael Theodore Theodora Althea, Alethea

    http://http://www.britishbabynames.c...08/godiva.html
    Site:http://www.britishbabynames.com/blog...08/godiva.html
    Tcc

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    114
    Hmm - what sort of styles do you like?
    I'm not sure exactly what you're looking for, so I had a think about some alternatives your daughter's mother might be open to. I also had a hard time coming up with names that sounded really good with Avery, so this is a kind of brainstorm.

    If she likes Rene (I'm assuming it's pronounced like Renee?) because it's a variation of a French name, she might like the sound of:
    Esme Avery
    Zoe Avery
    Amelie Avery
    Sylvie Avery (though this one has quite a lot of y and v sounds).
    Aurelie Avery (perhaps too similar?)
    Rosalie Avery

    If she likes the R-initial, maybe she'd like:
    Rose/Rosalie/Rosa/Rosario Avery (there are heaps of Rose variations I could list haha)
    Romilly Avery
    Wren Avery (okay, it's cheating, but it does sound sort of like Rene)
    Roberta Avery (this one might not be her style)
    Rebecca Avery (ditto?)
    Rachel Avery (same again)
    Raleigh Avery
    Rhonda Avery
    Ruby Avery
    Riley Avery
    Rowan Avery - I like this one quite a bit
    Roxy Avery
    Robin Avery
    Rio Avery
    Rhiannon Avery

    A name that reminds me of Avery AND starts with an R is Reverie, which might be something she's happy to consider. Have a think over some of these suggestions, and get back to us with some more details so we can help you find some more possible names for your daughter
    I'm Claire, an Australian teenberry. I love names and kids, but I'm not going to become a mum for at least ten years. Until then, I'm just playing with possibilities.

    For girls, I love:
    Matilda - Iulia - Rosa - Annalise - Linnea - Eva

    For boys, I love: Anders - Reuben - James - Jude - Caspar - Thomas

    Guilty pleasures are: Blaise - Orion - Caspian --- Madelief - Isolde - Hero

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    364
    Quote Originally Posted by fourthseason View Post
    Alright, this may be a stretch but the name meaning "My treasure" could extend to gift or God's gift or Gift from God. With that said, you have opened up your options. I will also give the site to the name so that you can read verify on the name option if you so choose it, as well as the owner of the site will answer any additional questions for you. I have had her personally work with me.

    Godiva/Godyfu - pronounced God-yee-va - means God's gift

    Godiva
    The extremely rare and semi-mythical name of an Anglo-Saxon heroine.



    Origin:

    From Old English name Godgyfu, composed of the elements god and gyfu "gift" -- "god's gift". Godiva is the Latinised form of the name.

    Usage:

    The Anglo-Saxon name Godgyfu / Godgifu is found on some of the few noble women women who are listed in surviving texts. It was pronounced god-yee-vuh (the stress usually falling on the first syllable, the 'f' becoming 'v' when between two vowels and the 'g' becoming a 'y' when followed by a front vowel). The name was often found latinised as Godiva on official documents

    The most famous bearer of the name is Lady Godiva (Countess Godifu), wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia who is said to have famously rode "naked" through the streets of Coventry to save the people from harsh taxation. Historians believe that "naked" refers not to her riding with no clothes on but taking off her finery, uncovering her hair, and wearing a simple shift -- removing all trace of her aristocracy.

    The name is extremely rare in usage. Six girls were given the name between 1840-1920. Three between 1960-1990. And eight children were given the name between 2000-2005.

    Famous Bearers:

    There are a few notable Anglo-Saxon noble women recorded with the name Godifu/Godiva:

    * Godgifu (d.c1080) wife of Leofric.
    * Princess Godgifu (1004-c1047) was the daughter of King Aethelred and Queen Emma, sister to King Edward the Confessor.
    * Godgifu was a wife of Siward, Earl of Northumbria.

    Tennyson wrote a poem titled "Godiva" after the countess of Mercia. There is also a brand of chocolate that bears her name and image.
    Variants:

    Godgyfu , Godgifu, Goda, Godife, Godgyue (Anglo-Saxon)

    Pronunciation:

    god-Ī-və (UK) god-eev-a (France, Spain) [key]

    Possible diminutives:

    Diva, Gida, Ida, Iva, Ivy, Viva, Vy

    Names with Same Meaning:

    Devdan Dorothea Dorothy Mattaniah Matthew Nathanael Theodore Theodora Althea, Alethea

    http://http://www.britishbabynames.c...08/godiva.html
    Site:http://www.britishbabynames.com/blog...08/godiva.html
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Althea, Alethea, Theadora, Theadocia or Theadosia, Dorothy, Dorthy all have the same meaning as Godiva mentioned above.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Bethia- Varient of the names mentioned above- Women of God

    Bethia
    A pretty and uncommon biblical Beth
    that is not an Elizabeth but is equally appealing.



    Origin:

    Bethia is a variant of the Hebrew Bithyah, a name thought to derive from bath "daughter, worshipper, woman" and Yah "God."
    The Hebrew Bithyah became Βετθία in the Greek Septuagint and Bethia in Vulgate Latin, however the form Bithiah was used in the King James Bible and other later authorised versions.

    Bithiah is mentioned only once in the Bible: "These are the sons of Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh" (1 Chronicles 4:18), which has caused much debate as to the origins of the name. What is clear is that Bithiah must have been a woman of position to have been given notable mention.

    In Jewish tradition, Bithiah is identified as the same Egytian princess who adopted Moses, the name of whom is never mentioned in the Old Testament. The explanation for her name Bithiah "daughter of Yah" is explained in the Midrash, whereupon God says to her: "Moses was not your son, yet you called him your son; you are not My daughter, but I call you My daughter" (Lev. Rabbah 1:3).

    Other scholars, less convinced that Bithiah was the same Egyptian princess who adopted Moses, have put forward the idea that Bithiah was given as a name to one of several Egyptians who converted to Judaism and settled in Israel, so has more a symbolic meaning of "worshipper of Yah."

    Confusingly, the beginning of 1 Chronicles 4:18 starts: "And his wife Jehudijah bore Jered the father of Gedor, and Heber the father of Soco, and Jekuthiel the father of Zanoah. And these are the sons of Bithiah the daughter of Pharaoh, who Mered took." Jehudijah is often given to mean "the Jewess" or "Judean," though it is not clear whether this passage refers to Bithiah herself as a "Judean woman", or to two separate wives of Mered, one of them being Bithiah. Some maintain that, if they are the same woman, Bithiah may not have been Egyptian at all; the 'Pharoah' mentioned could, in fact, be an Isrealite name.*

    But let's suppose that Bithiah was actually an Egyptian pharoah's daughter. A prevalent theory is that Bithiah was actually Tia (Tiya, Tuya), a daughter of Seti I, or another Tia who was Ramesses II's daughter. Bithiah, then, could be Bath (Melech) Tia "King's daughter, Tia"* or perhaps "daughter of Tia." Another theory assumes Bithiah is an alternate fom of Bintanath, a daughter/wife of Ramesses II. Her name meant "daughter of (the goddess) Anath."*

    Usage:

    Bethia has been in use in Britain since the 16th century, and this was by far the more common form of the name. In earlier records it was also less commonly recorded as Bithiah, Bethiah, Bethyah, Bethea and Bathia, but by the 17th century, Bethia was the prevalent spelling. Its use was consistent, though it was never especially common, akin to other Old Testament names such as Dinah, Tabitha, Vashti and Deborah.

    There are several possible reason for the dominance in this spelling.
    Firstly, Bethia was used from the 17th century to render the Scottish name Beathag — a diminutive of Scots Gaelic beath "life" — into English. Secondly, the name was seemingly conflated with Elizabeth and all its variant forms.

    C. M. Yonge thought it was Welsh or Scottish in origin, perhaps confusing Beathag and Bethan (Welsh diminutive of Elizabeth) together.
    Charles W. Bardesley, writing in 1880, considered it to be a latinised form of Elizabeth, stating: "Queen Anne’s reign, even William and Mary’s reign, saw the fashionable rage for Latinized forms [...] Elizabeth was turned into Bethia and Betha." However, his footnotes highlight that others regard it an "incorrect" form of Bithiah that was passed down through families.

    UK census records for the name Bethia demonstrate consistent usage through the 19th century:

    1841: 1,662 females
    1851: 2,073 females (51% England; 48% Scotland; 1% Wales)
    1861: 2,115 females
    1871: 1,946 females
    1881: 1,983 females (39% England; 60% Scotland; 1% Wales)
    1891: 2,109 females
    1901: 2,034 females

    Bethia was still well used up to the 1920s, after which it declined to just a handful of registrations per decade.

    Since 1996, Bethia has ranked every year in England and Wales (except 1997 and 2002) with a birth count of between 3 and 9. It's highest point was #1996 in 2003 and it's lowest was #5707 in 2010. In 2012 it ranked #4838 with 4 births.

    Bethia has not ranked at all in Scotland since 2005.

    Famous Bearers:

    History:

    * Bethia Baillie (b.c.1682), heiress of Castlecary Castle.
    * Lucy Bethia Walford (1845-1915), Scottish author.

    Contemporary:

    * Bethia Beadman (b.1981), British musician.

    Other:

    * Bethia, original name of the HMS Bounty.

    Variants:
    Bithiah, Bithia (Biblical) Bityah, Batyah, Batya (Hebrew)

    Pronunciation:

    BETH-ee-ə, beth-Ī-ə [key]

    Possible
    diminutives: Beth, Bea, Bebi, Betty

    http://www.britishbabynames.com/blog...12/bethia.html
    Tcc

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