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Thread: Irish Spellings

  1. #1

    Irish Spellings

    I come from Ireland and have an Irish name (Siobhan). I would love to include that heritage in my children's names but I have been wondering after reading an interesting thread on "youneek" spellings.

    If "youneek" names have discrimination from employers as I have read on a few threads, will Irish spellings be understood as traditional spellings or will they be misunderstood or discriminated against?

    Names such as

    Eilhoise (Family name said "Ay-leesh") F
    Caoimhe (Keeva) F
    Saoirse (Seer-sha) F
    Tadg (Teeg) M

  2. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4,149
    I guess as a name-nerd I’m a bit biased but I think that traditional Irish names are sort of the opposite of treendee and youneek names. In reality though I think that if you have an Irish last name most people will assume it’s Irish but if your last name is something other than Irish (say Italian or Croatian) I think there is a greater chance for people to assume a youneek spelling.
    ...if my husbands has no vote, then....
    Endora & Lorelei / Dexter & Gideon
    ...we are newlyweds and not trying...yet...

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    6,679
    I agree that Irish spellings are desirable, especially with an Irish or Celtic last name.
    Anastasia Pearl, Caroline Audrey, Catherine Maeve,
    Elizabeth Jane, Grace Charlotte, Rose Genevieve

    Benjamin Clark, Jack Ronan, James Frederick,
    Liam David, Luke Alexander, Patrick Elliot

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    6,980
    I definitely think Irish spellings are understood to be traditional and not generally mistaken for "youneek". Have you experienced discrimination you felt was due to your name?

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,962

    I think it is good

    Quote Originally Posted by srmarynapalm View Post
    I come from Ireland and have an Irish name (Siobhan). I would love to include that heritage in my children's names but I have been wondering after reading an interesting thread on "youneek" spellings.

    If "youneek" names have discrimination from employers as I have read on a few threads, will Irish spellings be understood as traditional spellings or will they be misunderstood or discriminated against?

    Names such as

    Eilhoise (Family name said "Ay-leesh") F
    Caoimhe (Keeva) F
    Saoirse (Seer-sha) F
    Tadg (Teeg) M
    to use traditional names and I love Celtic names. I do struggle with names like these because not only do I not know how to pronounce them, but I tend to forget once I know.

    I love the Welsh Eluned but I cannot seem to say it right.

    I don't know if people discriminate but I know people tend to avoid saying words they have no idea how to say...

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