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  1. #11
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    Carrigan's not really my style, but I think it'd make an ok middle. Sounds much more like a boy's name to me though.

    Quote Originally Posted by renrose View Post
    Again, Carrigan (KAH-rig-an) and Kerrigan (KEH-rig-an) are different words, not just different spellings of the same word. This is what I can't get my head around and I wondered why some accents see no distinction? It seems to cause a lot of confusion with Welsh/Irish names.
    Yeah I've always wondered about the lack of distinction between the CAH and CARE sounds in US accents. Same goes for with As, Es and Os being replaced with the letter Y, as seen in Jordan & Jordyn, Aiden & Aidyn, Braxton & Braxtyn etc -the endings of which sound totally different to my English ears. This aggravates me no end with some names (*cough* Elowen)!

  2. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by renrose View Post
    My thoughts.

    1. Yes, it sounds trendy to me.

    2. No, I don't think it's a real name. More likely a converted Irish surname. Most probably pronounced 'KAH-rih-gan' rather than 'CARE-ih-gan'.

    3. I think of 'cardigan' whenever I see it.



    Can someone explain this to me? I've seen it suggested for Cerys and Carys too (two separate names) and I just don't understand it. Here, the 'KEH' and 'KAH' sounds are not interchangeable in the slightest. For example, spelling 'lemon' as 'lamon' changes the sound completely. Am I missing something?

    I think it's a North American thing tbh. Doesn't make much sense to me either, but I do know that some people here read Cerys and Carys as the same pronunciation (CARE-iss).


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  3. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    Carrigan's not really my style, but I think it'd make an ok middle. Sounds much more like a boy's name to me though.



    Yeah I've always wondered about the lack of distinction between the CAH and CARE sounds in US accents. Same goes for with As, Es and Os being replaced with the letter Y, as seen in Jordan & Jordyn, Aiden & Aidyn, Braxton & Braxtyn etc -the endings of which sound totally different to my English ears. This aggravates me no end with some names (*cough* Elowen)!
    I've never gotten the y thing either - it makes sense in some cases, such as Ayden instead of Aiden, but with Jordyn, Mackynzie, Naythyn, etc, I don't understand it. Like, with Jordan and Jordyn, I'd pronounce them Jor-DAN and Jor-DIN. I think it's just our accents that change pronunciations though - similar to how er/or endings sometimes come out as 'ah' or 'eh' in an English accent.

    Elowyn would annoy me too, but, doesn't the Wyn/Wen ending in the Welsh language apply to Elowen as well?


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  4. #17
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    I found it interesting. If it were my choice I would have spelled it Kerrigan a là Sarah Kerrigan... Starcraft anyone?

    And yes, being American I can HEAR the differences in the sounds (duh, right?) and I know it my head that it (Carrigan) SHOULD be pronounced KAH, but my first instinct is KEH. Those are two completely different sounds, yes? The interchanging the Y for an E or A is a little different.. To Americans the sound change (if they pronounce it correctly) is subtle, therefore some do it for looks/whatever. I would pronounce Aiden differently than Aidyn. But not so much that anyone would really notice I think.
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  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lawsonhaley View Post
    Elowyn would annoy me too, but, doesn't the Wyn/Wen ending in the Welsh language apply to Elowen as well?
    No, because Elowen is Cornish and the rule doesn't apply. The 'en/enn' ending of Elowen doesn't refer to gender, it is, I believe, a suffix meaning tree, e.g. elaw (Cornish for elms) --> elowenn (elm tree); aval (apple) --> avalenn (apple tree) etc.


    ETA: By "a suffix meaning tree" I mean it becomes a singular tree, rather than collective! I don't word things very well...
    Last edited by charlieandperry1; July 26th, 2014 at 03:31 PM. Reason: clarification

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