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  1. #16
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    Oct 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by caty_beth89 View Post
    I think with names like Barack and Condoleeza in today's political scene, this is really a silly discussion. Those two prove that a "weird" name can succeed.

    And names change and grow over time. In a few years Poet and Atlas and such other "weird" names may be considered completely normal. I mean at one time Jordan on a girl would have been looked at as weird, but today, an employer isn't going to turn a possible good employee away because of that name.

    True, giving your child a more unusual or "cutesy" name may cause them a few hardships, but in the long run it could also make them a stronger person. Who knows?

    In the end, I think parents should name their child whatever name their gut tells them to use whether it be popular or rare, cutesy or strong. I know a very smart 14 year old named Antigone and as weird as her name is, she would never change it because her mother chose it especially for her with much love. That means so much more than choosing an easy-to-live-with name just for the sake of making things easy.
    Very well said.
    Maebry Eloise o Elle ? o Coralie Winter o ? ?
    Espen Rigby o Gray Everett o Brooks Wilder o Kai ?
    ----------------- o ----------------- o ------------------

    heart my son

  2. #18
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    Oct 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by freya_1983 View Post
    Go talk to people who actually do the hiring. Or read any of the numerous studies that have concluded that names do matter.
    I do know people that do the hiring. I have actually known quite a few people, some family members (some owning their own companies). Some having had very specific naming rules for their own children. One made the statement "Hogwash" when I brought up this thread.

    And as cary-beth said. Take a look at Barack and Condoleeza. How about Mitt, Newt, Lyndon, Woodrow, Grover, Rutherford, Ulysses, Millard, Butch, Deval, Eloy, and many using nicknames (Mike, Dan, Maggie, etc). These are all presidents and governors.
    Maebry Eloise o Elle ? o Coralie Winter o ? ?
    Espen Rigby o Gray Everett o Brooks Wilder o Kai ?
    ----------------- o ----------------- o ------------------

    heart my son

  3. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,491

    If

    people want to name their daughter after a kidnapped incest victim (yes, Persephone, stolen and raped by her uncle) then that is their business.

    If they want to name their daughter Domino which shares the floor with a game and a pizza chain, then that is is their business.

    If I prefer Forsythia to Karen, then that is my business.

    But the concept of thinking a name through is what a responsible parent does. S/he considers the sound, look, meaning, history, associations, nicknames, sibling names, and possibly even how well the name might suit a daughter (or son) throughout the person's life. To do less is to make a mockery of the rather large task of naming a fellow human being.

    And, yes, you can name her Parcheesi or him Ludwig when all is said and done, but at least you will have thought it through. That is the least we can do.

  4. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    125
    I agree with Freya -- as much as I would like to say that any person can thrive with any name, there is actual science to contradict that. It's often a relatively subtle thing, but I still don't want to make life harder for my little ones. I will add that most of the worst bias has to do with strongly ethnic names and creative spellings.

    Beyond that, the question is so very subjective-- which is why I'm grateful for naming forums, but everyone is rather wonderful and kind here. I do worry some that my [female] choices don't pass this test. It can't entirely be helped; I just don't like the more 'normal' names anywhere near as much.

    I try to find a middle ground by selecting names that have great nickname potential and a history of use. The latter may not be too logical, since it doesn't matter that a name is "classic" if no one has ever heard of it. Still, I hope these names would allow strangers to receive the names with curiosity and interest -- rather than disdain -- throughout the girls' lives.

    I try to avoid explicit word/nature names, because I feel like they say something so obvious about the parents' disposition towards the world-- and what if my daughter doesn't share that disposition as an adult? What if I name a baby girl Juniper and she's allergic to the shrub? Nevertheless, I adore those names and always will.

    It's all about finding a middle ground, I think. Unless our lives change dramatically in the next few years, our children will grow up on wooded acreage with rescue farm animals, an old brick farmhouse, a daddy who designs video games, a mommy who writes and illustrates storybooks. Their lives will never be entirely suburban/Sophie and Isabella-esque "normal". I just hope to make both the childhood and the names beautiful enough that they don't mind the difficulties that come with being a little different... while also minimizing those difficulties as best as I can.
    Last edited by shujayra; November 26th, 2013 at 02:35 PM.
    Married to my best friend since 6-30-11 ♥ Mama to two herding dogs, a wooly rabbit & a purring machine

    Current favorite combos for the women-to-be: Rowena Claire (Winnie) | Amabel Jane | Lilias Eve | Helene Iona (Lena)

    And the little men: Theodore James (Teddy) | Cedric Muir | Jude Peregrine | Henry Alcott

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Room 94
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    So, if, say my husband had a younger sister named Maisie who died tragically and he wanted to use Maisie as our daughter's first name in honour of that, we'd be irresponsible? Or if I want a son named Darcy, I'm irresponsible for choosing a 'girls' name for my son? I don't agree with a single thing you are saying here. I think you're just going to get yourself in a lot of hot water with a lot of Nameberry users with some of your comments, because, (from how I am reading it), you are saying that, anyone who names their child without looking into how it would age, it's sound, look, meaning, history, etc, they are being an irresponsible parent.

    FYI: My mother chose the name Haley Alannah because she liked it. No research was done. She and my dad only considered two spellings, Haley or Hayleigh. I was nearly Hayleigh, but my mum stopped herself from using it. Does that make my parents irresponsible?
    Last edited by lawsonhaley; November 26th, 2013 at 01:22 PM.
    "While some of the brightest of our celestial bodies are actually extinct now, their energy long since cooled; miraculously, because they float in the heavens so far away from us now, their beautiful light will continue to shine on us forever, and the glow will be so bright, it'll warm your heart, it'll make your eyes glisten, and it'll make you think to yourselves; what a concept"

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