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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    5,340
    Anything works in Europe, it's a tiny continent with lots of languages and people are (for the most) open minded about unfamiliar names, most cities are melting pots of nationalities now anyway. I think the biggest problem might be in France and some of the most eastern East European countries.
    [FONT=Palatino Linotype][CENTER]My darling Marian Illyria Aphrodite, March 2013 & Little Bunny (a girl!) due 9th of February 2014[/CENTER][/FONT]

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    113
    I don't think any country in Europe wil be a problem. But every country (language) will have it's own way of pronouncing names. And plenty of names are known one way or another in most countries. Margot/Margaux for instance can be pronounced in just about every language in Europe. I think you have the biggest chance of succes when you use either a French name or an English one.

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,895
    To bibliophile: the German pronunciation would make Veronica sound like 'Feroneeca' - the 'v' sound is an 'f' sound in German. Still pretty versatile though.
    I was thinking that Camille/Camilla was fairly versatile, as well as Lucy/Lucia and Elena.
    I'm twenty with a furbaby named Frederick

    * Beatrix * Clementine * Penelope * Cecilia * Margo *

    * Theodore * Hugo * Edmund * Felix * Lysander *

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    599
    We're an expat family but we move across Asia rather than Europe. Elizabeth wouldn't be the easiest name to pronounce here, it doesn't really matter if something is "classic" in one country if no-one in the country you live in has ever heard of it
    Our daughter's name Mila has been a good pick - simple and easy to pronounce in many languages.
    Then again, sometimes you can just get unlucky. I once worked with a woman called Alex in a part of India where "alex" sounds remarkably like a sexual slur in the local language.

    I don't think you can cover most eventualities, particularly as many expat families work on a 1-2 year contract basis so are frequently moving countries. However, picking something simple and avoiding troublesome combinations like th or sh or r (at least in some parts of Asia) can be helpful.
    Mother to two lovely kiddos, Mila Arden and Cato Bennett

    Currently dreaming of...
    Atlas Calloway, Atlas Bram, Atlas Octavian
    Lyra Marigold, Lyra Blythe, Lyra Clementine

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,055
    I ask this because in the distant future when I have a family, I would like to consider us moving to Germany, Austria or Czech Republic (my great-uncle and cousin live in Hamburg, North Germany - which I've visited often and I love).
    Thanks! These suggestions are great, anymore are welcome!

    'Jess' Jessica Emily Faith
    Living down under...
    Australian/German/South African/Scottish/English/Irish/Romani
    Elsa: Mystical, magical, completely unique, baffling and all her own

    Ronan: Spicy, little boys wearing plaid shirts, running around in kneeless jeans, playing in the mud and being mischievous.
    Other considerations
    Mary Belle - Conrad - Elaina/Elena? - Jonas

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