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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
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    1,960
    Quote Originally Posted by kala_way View Post
    Vest and jumper mean different things as well. We all get very crossed when it comes to clothes. Must make it crazy tough for clothing companies that operate in both countries.

    The root/rowt difference for route depends on the circumstances. I use both depending on what I'm talking about Route 66 is always "root", but if I was saying, "Please route this paperwork to the correct department" I'd say "rowt". We use paperwork called a Router at my job, and the idea of calling it a "rooter" is pretty funny. But then we don't use row to mean argument like you do (not even sure that's the correct spelling, I've just heard Brit's say, "we're having a row" meaning fight). Oh and rooter means a plumber specializing in clearing clogs

    The flattening of the O sound in names like Tom is part of the midwest accent influence (maybe Canadian as well). I always say Tom to rhyme with bomb.

    Oh yeah, vest = waistcoat. But then what would you call sleeveless tops?

    I didn't realise that route depends on what you're talking about, though it makes sense when thinking about Route 66. I reckon the only time we say 'rowter' is when talking about the tool. And I didn't know a 'row' was just British! I've never thought about that one before. Haven't heard of a plumber rooter though.

    In both my accent and when I try it in an American accent, Tom rhymes with bomb. The only way I can explain the difference is with Don and Dawn which I'm told sound the same over the pond. They're quite different in my southern English accent.
    Last edited by charlieandperry1; October 2nd, 2013 at 04:40 PM.
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  2. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    606
    Geeknamez, sorry for the late reply, I leave the thread for a few days and it's more than doubled in length I'm from Alexandria (which incidentally I love as a name, but would probably only consider as a middle).

    The route pronunciation gets me too I switch it up depending on the context, like I would actually say, "I'm on 'root' 1. Which 'rowt' should I take?" which drives my bf batty but just makes me laugh then again with his southern accent, I laugh at how he pronounces both a pen and a pin the same (like pin). You don't write with a pin!!

  3. #80
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,970
    @C&P, Hannah and other Britberries: Canada's quite interesting because we use a mix of the two. We use British spellings (e.g. colour not color) though some people use the American ones in casual writing. Our pronunciation is generally closer to America's. I'm from Toronto though and there isn't really a "Toronto accent"; I have relatives from western Canada and various places in the States and I don't find their accents noticeably different. Some people in eastern Canada (the Maritimes region) have a bit of a regional accent, but it's close enough I'd know 99-100% of what they were saying.

    Vocabulary- we use some UK, some US and some of our own! Probably more of the US ones though. Or sometimes, both words are used. Examples:
    -postcode (UK)/ZIP code (US)/postal code (Can)
    -tap (UK,Can)/faucet (US)
    -crisps (UK)/chips (US/Can)
    -tights (UK)/pantyhose (US), Canada both

    There are lots but just can't think of/find any more! Of course, I just confuse myself more by watching a lot of UK-made movies and reading UK books and newspapers!
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  4. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Anaheim, CA
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    2,009
    @anotherkate, wow that's close! My dad used to work in Alexandria. I'm from a bit further out into the suburbs--think end of the Orange Line .

    And @bonfireazalea: I'm in the US and I use tap and faucet interchangeably. I also always say tights, not pantyhose--I think it's mainly older generations that call them that.
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  5. #84
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6,588
    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    Oh yeah, vest = waistcoat. But then what would you call sleeveless tops?

    I didn't realise that route depends on what you're talking about, though it makes sense when thinking about Route 66. I reckon the only time we say 'rowter' is when talking about the tool. And I didn't know a 'row' was just British! I've never thought about that one before. Haven't heard of a plumber rooter though.

    In both my accent and when I try it in an American accent, Tom rhymes with bomb. The only way I can explain the difference is with Don and Dawn which I'm told sound the same over the pond. They're quite different in my southern English accent.
    Sleeveless top is a tank top.

    I didn't even know there was a tool called a "rowter", but I do remember that you call a wrench a spanner.

    Hearing the difference of a flatter O sound is similar to the second A sound in salaam, LAHM rather than LOHM (like in Carol Lombard). TAHM rather than TOHM.

    But you're right, there's no difference between Don and Dawn in my accent.
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