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  1. #71
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    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    US pants are trousers but UK pants are underwear.
    Not everywhere in the UK. When I started uni in Lancashire two years ago, someone complimented me on my 'really nice pants'. I was rather shocked for a second or two before I realised what they meant. Another weird thing they do up here (in my opinion ) is call their lunch their dinner. I did get rather confused when my friend asked me at 12.00 in the afternoon what I was having for my dinner. I answered that I hadn't really thought about that, after all, I hadn't had my lunch yet!
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  2. #73
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanniekitt View Post
    Not everywhere in the UK. When I started uni in Lancashire two years ago, someone complimented me on my 'really nice pants'. I was rather shocked for a second or two before I realised what they meant. Another weird thing they do up here (in my opinion ) is call their lunch their dinner. I did get rather confused when my friend asked me at 12.00 in the afternoon what I was having for my dinner. I answered that I hadn't really thought about that, after all, I hadn't had my lunch yet!
    Whaaaa?! I've never heard anyone call trousers 'pants' in my life! If someone complimented me on my pants, I'd be checking to see if I had a hole in my jeans or something But then I do live in the south. The dinner thing I can relate to though. I say lunch or dinner for the midday meal and tea for the evening one. Funny how it varies, even in your own country

  3. #75
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    Whaaaa?! I've never heard anyone call trousers 'pants' in my life! If someone complimented me on my pants, I'd be checking to see if I had a hole in my jeans or something But then I do live in the south. The dinner thing I can relate to though. I say lunch or dinner for the midday meal and tea for the evening one. Funny how it varies, even in your own country
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  4. #77
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    May 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    Then there are words we both have which mean different things. US pants are trousers but UK pants are underwear. US cot is a camp bed, UK cot is a baby's crib. US suspenders hold up a man's trousers, but if a UK man said he was wearing suspenders he would get very odd looks

    Words sound different too. I've heard paper route (which we call a paper round) pronounced so route rhymes with shout. Here it's route as in 'root'. And I've also noticed the short 'O' sound (like in Tom) generally gets lengthened to a longer 'AH' sound in many American accents. I should probably stop wittering on now. Language is amazing!
    Vest and jumper mean different things as well. We all get very crossed when it comes to clothes. Must make it crazy tough for clothing companies that operate in both countries.

    The root/rowt difference for route depends on the circumstances. I use both depending on what I'm talking about Route 66 is always "root", but if I was saying, "Please route this paperwork to the correct department" I'd say "rowt". We use paperwork called a Router at my job, and the idea of calling it a "rooter" is pretty funny. But then we don't use row to mean argument like you do (not even sure that's the correct spelling, I've just heard Brit's say, "we're having a row" meaning fight). Oh and rooter means a plumber specializing in clearing clogs

    The flattening of the O sound in names like Tom is part of the midwest accent influence (maybe Canadian as well). I always say Tom to rhyme with bomb.
    Last edited by kala_way; October 2nd, 2013 at 05:08 PM.
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  5. #79
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by kala_way View Post
    Vest and jumper mean different things as well. We all get very crossed when it comes to clothes. Must make it crazy tough for clothing companies that operate in both countries.

    The root/rowt difference for route depends on the circumstances. I use both depending on what I'm talking about Route 66 is always "root", but if I was saying, "Please route this paperwork to the correct department" I'd say "rowt". We use paperwork called a Router at my job, and the idea of calling it a "rooter" is pretty funny. But then we don't use row to mean argument like you do (not even sure that's the correct spelling, I've just heard Brit's say, "we're having a row" meaning fight). Oh and rooter means a plumber specializing in clearing clogs

    The flattening of the O sound in names like Tom is part of the midwest accent influence (maybe Canadian as well). I always say Tom to rhyme with bomb.

    Oh yeah, vest = waistcoat. But then what would you call sleeveless tops?

    I didn't realise that route depends on what you're talking about, though it makes sense when thinking about Route 66. I reckon the only time we say 'rowter' is when talking about the tool. And I didn't know a 'row' was just British! I've never thought about that one before. Haven't heard of a plumber rooter though.

    In both my accent and when I try it in an American accent, Tom rhymes with bomb. The only way I can explain the difference is with Don and Dawn which I'm told sound the same over the pond. They're quite different in my southern English accent.
    Last edited by charlieandperry1; October 2nd, 2013 at 05:40 PM.

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