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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,803

    Upper Class baby names

    Anna over Waltzing more than Matilda posted about upper class baby names since its a topic that comes up a lot here, I figured that I would share the link. My opinions: My names lower class yet my siblings are upper class? (Adele and Isaac). I find some of these simply attempts to sound smart after all a Florence could be from a worse family then a Chantelle you just never really know. I know a Jaidyn who’s sister is named Janelle. And two Taylah’s board at my school and The only Pearl I know is indigenous (not being racist but they tend to earn less) an upper class name. Just because your name is Penelope doesn’t mean your parents are rich.

    In short form I don't think class effects names at all I'm from a middle class family and my name is Ebony which in America is considered lower class while my siblings are the upper class Adele and Isaac.
    〜Ebs〜
    Isobel*Eloise*Matilda*Alice*Eleanor*Amelia*Elena* Mirabel* Felicity* Phoebe*Tallaulah*Eilidh*Rosalia*Roisin*Azalea*Elsa *
    Eamon*Tiago*Cooper*Jack*Jago*Flynn*Archer*Lincoln* Asher*Alfie*Taylor* Finnian* Baxter* Lawson*Jasper*Deacon*Lewis*
    babynameobsessed.wordpress.com

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3,009
    I'm in the middle of America, and Ebony is only considered lower-class if it's misspelled, and even then she wouldn't be treated differently solely due to her name--personality and confidence count more than anything else here, I think. Then, perhaps farther down the list, education and material wealth.

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,960
    I think class boundaries are more fluid these days and it's hard to really categorise someone as it's to do with more than just how much you earn. However, I think class -at least in the UK- is definitely still linked with names. E.g. if I was told I was going to meet a family of Archibald, Jemima and Montgomery, I'd be quite surprised if I was whisked off to a council house with a sofa in the front garden and chavs lurking on the street corners. Likewise, I'd be surprised to find Aydn, Jaxxen and Mckenzie at Eton. There just are names more popular in each crowd. If you could somehow identify the class of the parent alongside popular names, I'm sure you'd find disparity between the top ranking names.

    The only thing we get close to 'evidence' is with things like BAs- if you look at BBN's data for the most popular names announced in the Torygraph, they tend to be the classic, formal types favoured by those who would identify with a higher class (which makes sense as broadsheets are more 'upper class' newspapers) : Name Data - British Baby Names
    I'd also argue that those higher up the social ladder are more likely to go to good schools, more likely to be driven and thus more likely to achieve better results. A study by the Department for Education showed that the names most popular amongst the achievers of the best GCSE were Katharine, Bryony, Eleanor, Philippa and Madeleine- all classic, 'middle class' names who are 8x more likely to pass their GCSEs than Dwaynes or Waynes: 'Kayleigh, Tyler... this could be hell' - magazine article - TES

    Of course it doesn't mean that all little Aramintas and Algernons are angels or Jaydens and Courtneys are criminals- that's definitely not what I'm trying to infer/discuss. Being of a lower class doesn't mean you're horrible. And it certainly doesn't mean there can't be high-achieving, upper class Tylers or chavvy, lower class Florences. I just think there are popularity differences between social groups just as there are between countries. Nothing wrong with that
    William ♠ Thomas ♠ Peter ♠ Henry ~ Rose ♠ Alice ♠ Ivy ♠ Lowenna
    Mowesi ~ Henwyn Kernewek ~ Mebyon

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    318
    I am not sure I understood a single thing you wrote.

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    313
    I had a look at the trendy middle and upper-class ba names from the Times and Telegraph, and was quite surprised at some of the names that sound unconventional... like Jago. I wonder if the upper classes are trying to find yewnique names in larger numbers nowadays?

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