Names Searched Right Now:
Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 7 8 9
Results 41 to 45 of 45
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2,734
    Re: Newfoundlands. Our neighbour has one that's the same age as our dog. He's enormous, sheds everywhere and drools like a tap. No offense, vitamom, but I would never consider getting one! For me, the worst part is that his owner (who is an average sized man) can't properly control him. If he decides to run into the road, his owner can't stop him. I've seen the owner go splat on the footpath several times trying to control the dog. So I'd definitely advise against getting a dog that's too big to control properly (pretty much anything bigger than Husky or Labrador size). Also, big dogs don't live as long.
    TTC #1

    Audrey - Beatrice - Clara - Daphne - Jane - Margaret - Susannah - Violet

    Arthur - Barnaby - Edward - Frederick - Henry - Rupert - Theodore - Walter

  2. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    227
    @sarahmezz, yep... As I said they do shed but it can be managed pretty well simply by grooming them properly. They have a thick undercoat so they need lots of brushing. As for the drool, it depends on the dog. Ours was not too bad but I have seen some that drool quite a bit. The maintenance is something to go into with eyes wide open which is why we opted to wait to get another, but a worthwhile undertaking if aware ahead of time.

    As far as managing the dog. I am petite. In fact my dog easily had 30lbs on me. It was never an issue. We trained him properly from the start. I worked with developmentally disabled adults at the time and used to take him to work. He would let anyone of them, including those in wheelchairs, walk him and I was never worried he would pull or take off. Honestly if the dog is 5 lbs or 150 lbs it can get into or cause trouble in lots of ways if not properly trained. It's an investment of time and resources for sure but necessary no matter the size of the dog.

    In regards to life span, it's true the large and giant breeds have shorter life spans but I don't see that as a reason to not get one if its the right fit. I wish my Newfie had been around longer but I certainly don't regret getting him just because he did not live as long as a smaller dog may have.

  3. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    england
    Posts
    141
    Well obviously because i have a smooth haired dachshund i would suggest one but of course it sounds likes you would be wanting a bigger dog. Still i must say how great they are, he is my first dachshund and the best breed i have ever had or met! Their personalites are similar to a Westie or a Pug. He isn't like other small dogs(maltese, bichon, chihuahua etc)at all though as he's not snappy of timid and at the same time he isn't as full on as a terrier. Some smaller dachshunds do exhibit some of these behaviours but i believe that is because of over miniaturisation, mine is what they call a 'tweenie' meaning he's not a big as a standard but a bit bigger then a miniature(he's about 8-9kg/19lb and quite a solid little thing). He has such a big personality and he loves to playfully wrestle with bigger dogs but never gets aggressive, he also loves being petted by children. Also my mother loves the fact that he's so low maintenance and doesn't really have much of a doggy odour. The long haired ones are great too(although as with any long haired dog it means a bit more maintenance) and they are quite mellow except when it's play time. I wouldn't suggest the wire haired though as they can be a bit terrier like. Anyway this breed would also be a good choice as they won't knock your kids down accidently like a bigger dog probably would. Also they are quite a healthy breed(their backs are the main problem you might encounter, but if they stay lean and don't do too much excessive jumping they are usually fine.) and can live to 18+, i know someone who currently has a 19yr old. They also make good hunters as they are very determined. I usually take him for 1hr walks here in dorset.
    Last edited by leona23; August 19th, 2013 at 10:58 PM.
    Excludes my top 7 girls and top 7 boys names.

    girls reserve list - Lucia(loo-see-a) - Orla -Kitty (katherine) - Iris - Celia - Ilona(ee-low-na)

    boys RL - Caspar - Tristan - Rowan - Charles (not charlie)

    Note: Official names in brackets and they are just that 'official'.

  4. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    england
    Posts
    141
    But if you are definitely looking for a bigger dog you would have to be willing to train it well so that you can control it better. So it shouldn't just be smart breed but also eager to please. A Golden retriever, Cocker spaniel or Border Collie would be a good choice for this. Border Collies do need more exercise but if you are going to be living in the country that shouldn't be a problem. Huskies wouldn't be a good idea if you will ever get a cat or any smaller animal as everyone iv'e met with one has said that they really hate cats and like to chase anything small! I'm pretty sure that english setters a quite a calm dog however in addition to being gorgeous and they aren't as silly as the irish setters often are. Flat coated Retrievers are also great and they are very similar to a Golden in looks and personality except that they are either black or liver in colour. Bernese Mountain dogs don't live that long and although you may not care about it at the moment you will when they are older and you want them to stay with you for as long as possible. The german shepard doesn't live for very long either. All the breeds i mentioned above generally live longer then a lot of larger dog breeds.

    Actually Standard Poodles are great. The second most intellligent dog and very energetic(not at all prissy!)and devoted.
    Last edited by leona23; August 19th, 2013 at 11:08 PM.
    Excludes my top 7 girls and top 7 boys names.

    girls reserve list - Lucia(loo-see-a) - Orla -Kitty (katherine) - Iris - Celia - Ilona(ee-low-na)

    boys RL - Caspar - Tristan - Rowan - Charles (not charlie)

    Note: Official names in brackets and they are just that 'official'.

  5. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    2,546
    I haven't read all the responses, but I'd like to add my two cents. My parents are dog people, but we didn't have dogs until I was about seven. Our first dog was a Jack Russel Terrier and he was a nightmare. We really tried to train him and fit him into our home, but he was nearly untrainable. After six years we had to give him up because he was just so awful (for example: he jumped onto the table and ate sausage off of my dads plate; he used to attack my friends while we ran around the front yard, and he'd bark non stop.)
    Our current dogs are pit bull mixes. I can't say for certain what their lineage is, but I can say that they're excellent dogs. They're very friendly (one especially) and they're good watch dogs. They don't bark very often, and they get along with our cats. They never bite, and their low maintenance in terms of brushing and grooming. My grandmother- who is NOT a dog person- does well with them. She tells them to leave her alone, and they generally do.
    Because I needed something to justify why I take so many pictures of them, attached are a couple of pictures. Shasta is the one with the goofy grin and Birdie is the one sitting on a bed.
    Attached Images
    -Athena

    Top Girls: Under Construction

    Top Boys: Under Construction

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •