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  1. #16
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    Aug 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by jyoti View Post
    I do like your naming approach, except I disagree with #3 of your MN criteria.

    I am Indian-American (Indian ancestry, born and raised in California), and I'm not sure what my naming criteria/approach is. I'm "drawn" to more female "American" or more correctly, Western names, because of my education and the books I read, but then I am a Hindu so I'd like to use a name with some religious element perhaps. Oddly, I like a lot of Indian boy's names, but not so many girl's names.

    If you're using an Indian name, I'd use a short one. I think when people see a long Indian name, it intimidates them and they'll stumble on the pronunciation even if the name is phonic. That would be the issue with Ramayani, I believe.

    I also made a list of "easy" Indian names (girl's names, in alphabetical order, are first); you may want to check it out: User List - Indian Names - Jyoti | Nameberry.com
    Thanks for the input! I have been through all the Hindu names pretty extensively including a sanskrit database. I don't like most of the girl names because they either are pronounced differently here (like shailu or sundari) or are TOO simple for me to like (like mala or isha). I haven't found any names I haven't already considered, so at this point we will probably use a Western first name like diana.

  2. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    We are also considering Annika even though it's westernized and I really dislike how Indians pronounce it too. Uh-NEEK-uh. I say it Ann-ikuh.

  3. #20
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    Jul 2013
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    Even in the west, I'm not sure you'd get the Annika pronunciation you want all the time. All of the Annika's I know are AHN-ih-kah.


    I think your best bet would be to use something you like the pronunciation of in English, even if it has a different pronunciation in India.
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  4. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by verminator View Post
    Thanks for the input! I have been through all the Hindu names pretty extensively including a sanskrit database. I don't like most of the girl names because they either are pronounced differently here (like shailu or sundari) or are TOO simple for me to like (like mala or isha). I haven't found any names I haven't already considered, so at this point we will probably use a Western first name like diana.
    Yes, I have a really hard with Indian girl's names too. Over the years, I've gone through several websites and such, and can't find anything I like either. I like a few boys names, but nothing for the girls. I don't like the super-simple names, and I don't like the long, frilly ones either, and so many have out-dated, anti-feminist meanings I don't like, i.e., "Kumari" means virgin, or "Maya" means illusion, it refers to sort of worldly, materialistic illusion. The meanings of Indian names are tricky. There's a bunch of popular short names that people are starting to use and twist the meanings of. There's Arya/Aryan, which got popular after it was used by a major Bollywood actor. It's being passed off as meaning "noble", but it's a direct reference to the "noble" Aryans, who (maybe, it's debated in the academic community) came into India @ 1500 BC, or "Anaya" which people now say means "one of a kind" or "incomparable" but it also means homeless, orphaned - "one of a kind" in that you're alone and wandering the earth (that's the way it's used in religious texts).

    I think Apsara and Mayuri (NN Sara and May perhaps) are o.k., but don't love them. And I do like my own name, but it already been used.

    Those "simple" girls names are so trendy in the Indian-American community too - if your husband and you have a lot of Indian-American family and/or family here, you'll probably encounter them. I know multiple people with the names Priya, Isha/Eesha, Anayas, Tara, Maya etc. I also know a few Indian Natasha's. P

    I think you're safe if you pick an Indian name that you like the "American pronunciation" of. Most of the time, my name is pronounced the American way (without the "y", which is really difficult for Americans) because I am around English speakers at school and most of my day.
    Last edited by jyoti; August 11th, 2013 at 03:06 PM.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by jyoti View Post
    Yes, I have a really hard with Indian girl's names too. Over the years, I've gone through several websites and such, and can't find anything I like either. I like a few boys names, but nothing for the girls. I don't like the super-simple names, and I don't like the long, frilly ones either, and so many have out-dated, anti-feminist meanings I don't like, i.e., "Kumari" means virgin, or "Maya" means illusion, it refers to sort of worldly, materialistic illusion. The meanings of Indian names are tricky. There's a bunch of popular short names that people are starting to use and twist the meanings of. There's Arya/Aryan, which got popular after it was used by a major Bollywood actor. It's being passed off as meaning "noble", but it's a direct reference to the "noble" Aryans, who (maybe, it's debated in the academic community) came into India @ 1500 BC, or "Anaya" which people now say means "one of a kind" or "incomparable" but it also means homeless, orphaned - "one of a kind" in that you're alone and wandering the earth (that's the way it's used in religious texts).

    I think Apsara and Mayuri (NN Sara and May perhaps) are o.k., but don't love them. And I do like my own name, but it already been used.

    Those "simple" girls names are so trendy in the Indian-American community too - if your husband and you have a lot of Indian-American family and/or family here, you'll probably encounter them. I know multiple people with the names Priya, Isha/Eesha, Anayas, Tara, Maya etc. I also know a few Indian Natasha's. P

    I think you're safe if you pick an Indian name that you like the "American pronunciation" of. Most of the time, my name is pronounced the American way (without the "y", which is really difficult for Americans) because I am around English speakers at school and most of my day.
    Yep, my name happens to be Natasha and it's nice to have the flexibility. And yeah, Maya not only means Illusion, there is even a demon in Hindu mythology. I am sure glad I researtched the spelling of Dayana instead of Diana, too!

    My son is named Tejan, by the way. I kind of invented this name by combining Gajen (from Gajendran but with American pronounciation) and Tejas, and then found out if was a legitemate but extremely uncommon name even in India, and it has a lovely range of meanings in Sanskrit.

    My husband likes that it sounds Punjabi. It does get mispronounced when people read it but that doesn't bother me because it's an easy fix. Still, when somebody asks his name, they don't USE it right off the bat, which is too bad because it's pretty simple.

    I would pick Sundari, but I can see why many Indians think it's silly and I don't like how it sounds when DH says it. I would think a girl named beautiful or pretty was laughable too and that's basically how obvious the meaning is.

    I agree about the anti-feminist names. In fact, it was why I decided against mayuri. I want my daughter to have a name that means something virtuous or bold, not tiny and fragile like a peahen. But it IS a beautiful word. And yeah, I don't want my daughter to have the same indian-american name Arya that all the other Western moms are giving their half-indian daughters, either. DH loved the name Aryan for a boy until I had my husband google it.

    ETA: I actually just looked up "peahen" and see now that I was somewhat foolish in my earlier comments about the meaning of the name mayuri. I thought a peahen was some other kind of small bird. It's meaning as a peacock is nice because I know that's actually pretty "auspicious".

    So, thanks for bringing it up:-) IT's back on my list.
    Last edited by verminator; August 11th, 2013 at 11:04 PM.

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