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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,962
    I think every name comes with associations and assumptions. Someone's experience can outshine their name, for sure, but for someone just starting out an outlandish name could either give them an edge or rule them out in a sea of similar resumes. It totally varies depending on the person reviewing the info and the industry involved. In a creative field, Satchel could easily seem more interesting than James. In a very conservative office Wildflower might not get an interview. I think that name assumptions are rapidly changing and soon enough most HR people will realize that James Smith might just as likely be a woman as a man. In the end an applicant's personality and poise matters above all else so long as your experience is enough to get you an interview in the first place.

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    384
    A long time ago, I went to a doctor who had someone in the practice with a name that was already very, very unusual and also spelled krii8yflee. I don't want to put her real name in here, but it would be on the same shelf as Ahrreggyno. I didn't get to see her because she was always booked full. She was the best in her specialty in the area and her name didn't seem to matter. I hope we're moving away from holding a parent's decision against their children.
    Mommy to Mr. Ivan Eli

    Hoping a little too hard for Otis Alfie . Angus Rex . Chester Malcolm . Remy Wolfram . Wren Winter . Fae Sylvana . Thora Violet . Starling Delilah

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,196
    I think the only problem that exists are stereotypes of misspelled/made up names.

    In my history class last year, we were going through the First Ladies of the US Presidents up to 1874. When we ran into Letitia, some fairly obnoxious guys in my class blurted, "That's a black ghetto name!" They were trying to be funny, but it does bring up some issues that even non-name nerds have with names. (Even though Letitia is an ancient name with a history of usage.)

    My classmates (who know nothing about names) know a name that looks like it came from the inner city (they listed some for me, when I asked, like Jaquan and Makeisha.) Sadly, these names hold stereotypes of 'poor black family from inner city', even if that is almost never the case. It could make employers scrutinize the application more so than if Sophia or Jacob was at the top.

    But, if it's an unusual, offbeat name like Isadora or Evander, I don't think there will be a problem.

    (This might just be the name nerd part of me, but whenever I run into an unusual name (that's not made up or misspelled), I want to get to know the person. Of course, names don't matter at all in the scope of whether I become friends with that person, but if an Astrid is the new girl, it certainly intrigues me.)

    IMHO, most employers want to bring in a more diverse work environment. I don't think names matter that much anymore.
    ~lucy reine~
    ~ celestine eira ~ mary simona ~ elizabeth echo "ellie" ~ eleanor maeve "lena" ~ vivienne isla ~ celia matilda "cici" ~ catherine aiko "rin" ~ elsa verity ~
    ~ jasper red ~ evander lachlan 'evan'~ kai nicholas ~ ezra link ~ avery thomas ~ michael satoshi "mischa" ~ finn jeremias ~ ezekiel hayden ~ alexander rowan "sacha" ~
    guilty pleasures
    ~ tisiphone aria ~ alecto elpis ~ miya lucida ~ addison matteo ~ corinthian tidus ~

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,685

  5. #14
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    7,083
    Quote Originally Posted by taz View Post
    I think every name comes with associations and assumptions. Someone's experience can outshine their name, for sure, but for someone just starting out an outlandish name could either give them an edge or rule them out in a sea of similar resumes. It totally varies depending on the person reviewing the info and the industry involved. In a creative field, Satchel could easily seem more interesting than James. In a very conservative office Wildflower might not get an interview. I think that name assumptions are rapidly changing and soon enough most HR people will realize that James Smith might just as likely be a woman as a man. In the end an applicant's personality and poise matters above all else so long as your experience is enough to get you an interview in the first place.
    I agree with this.
    It depends primarily on the field and on the experience and opinions of the person reviewing the resume.
    I work in tandem with a creative field and know several people with interesting names, however, on the financial side of it, I know my boss would likely scoff at names she considered "silly".
    However, there's just as high of a chance that she'd turn down someone who had the same name as someone else in the department--just because it's annoying to deal with!
    Of course, all of this would depend on how good the resume was. I doubt anyone would turn down a perfect fit just because of a name, but given 2 similar resumes, it might be a factor in who got called and who didn't.
    Olivia/Livia/Livy/Liv : Thessaly/Darah/Bethel : Noelle/Eve
    Benedict/Eli: Jude/Zane: Luke/Darius : Levi/Phineas/Calvin


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