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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    188

    If a name is popular in the UK, will it inevitably cross the pond?

    So, I love the name Matilda (prefer the spelling Mathilda but using Matilda here as it's more common). Of course, when I started to love it, I thought it was unusual. Also, I feel like it's one very German name which is usable, and German names are my GP (plus my heritage). And I adore Hilda, Tilda, Hilde, Tildie, as nns.

    But then I found out it's trendy in the UK...not to mention in Australia, Germany, Sweden, Finland...So I've pretty much crossed it off my list because of this, assuming signs are pointing to it trending up in the US, too. But...it HAS been rising over the last few years in the US, but is only in the 600s now. So, really, still very uncommon. Is it inevitable that it will continue to shoot up?

    Is the US generally a few years behind the UK in naming trends? Or are there names that just don't transfer? Can you think of examples where names became popular in the US about 5-10 yrs after becoming big in the UK? Does it ever happen vice versa, names big in the US hit the UK later?

    Another name that popped in my head is Freya, which is apparently high on the UK lists, but totally outside of the top 1000 here. Is that another one that we're just lagging behind in recognizing? Or is there an appeal to this name that's lost in the US? (This is one I'm not particularly interested in, but curious about the discrepancy.)

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,190
    I don't think UK/Australian/other European name trends affect US very much, unless the name was associated with a particular celebrity, film or TV series. Names like Freya, Imogen, Harry, Louis, Alfie etc haven't made the transition at all.

    Matilda Ledger probably helped popularise the name, but she's like 6 years old now and the name shows no signs of climbing quickly, even though it fits current trends: romantic, classic 3 syllable names ending in -a (like Sophia, Isabella, Olivia). The name being on the lower half of the Top 100 already means that the probability of your daughter having to share her name with many other girls is very low — unless she goes by Matty and gets confused with all the Madelyns/Madisons/Madeleines around.

    I think is a great, versatile name. Go for it!
    Arabella, Thibault, Sophia, Alfred, Eleanor, Rémi, Charlotte, Achille, Olivia, Clement, Elizabeth, Frederick, Maud, Benedict, Adèle.

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    503
    Why don't you go beyond the whims of fleeting fashion home or abroad? Lachlan's been popular forever Australia but has never been much of a hit here. I guess it also matters where in the US you are. If you pick a state with an adjacent ocean in a major city's posh hood, Henry has been popular since the 80s. As a former teacher at various levels of the social, economic, and racial classes, you'd be surprised what you find and I live in LA. Yes, if it's been trending on the Social Security list for a few years, I'd pause. Go with something that has meaning and significance. Dust off those family trees. Be inspired by the books and movies while avoiding naming them after some reality star. How do you see your son or daughter with that name being called that at graduations or weddings? Sometimes even British/Americans like Anna Wintour can be wrong.

  4. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    1,505
    Quote Originally Posted by sugarplumfairy View Post
    I don't think UK/Australian/other European name trends affect US very much, unless the name was associated with a particular celebrity, film or TV series. Names like Freya, Imogen, Harry, Louis, Alfie etc haven't made the transition at all.

    Matilda Ledger probably helped popularise the name, but she's like 6 years old now and the name shows no signs of climbing quickly, even though it fits current trends: romantic, classic 3 syllable names ending in -a (like Sophia, Isabella, Olivia). The name being on the lower half of the Top 100 already means that the probability of your daughter having to share her name with many other girls is very low — unless she goes by Matty and gets confused with all the Madelyns/Madisons/Madeleines around.

    I think is a great, versatile name. Go for it!
    Sugarplum said it all!
    [FONT=Times New Roman]
    [CENTER]~Ebony~
    ----------------------------
    [COLOR="#66cc33"]Ignatius - Jasper - Hugo - Edmund - Henry - Oliver - Rupert - Felix - Percy - August - Atticus - Amias - Otto - Barnaby - Arthur - Ezra - Hector - Charles[/COLOR]
    [COLOR="#cc99cc"]Antigone - Hermione - Harriet - Cordelia - Violet - Persephone - Beatrice/Beatrix - Clementine - Ottilie - Florence - Octavia - Drusilla - Agnes - Ida - Matilda - Xanthe[/COLOR]

    [/CENTER]
    [SIZE=1]Previously ebonyeden[/SIZE]

    [RIGHT][SIZE=1]avatar is my 8th great grandmother.[/SIZE][/RIGHT][/font]

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    256
    A little aside point, Matilda in Australia, though perhaps growing in popularity, has the potential for a bit of schoolyard teasing. There's an iconic song in Aus called Waltzing Malitda that all kids learn at school (that also has a lot of crass, schoolboy versions that we all grew up with as well!) so I have actually found my friends avoiding this name completely. I think it is a lovely name though, and if I didn't have that association then It would be in my top 3. If you don't live in Aus I would be totally using it!
    Mummy to the gorgeous Alice Heather and the delicious Harry George

    Bubba #3 due March 2014! Finalising short list of favourite names!

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