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Thread: Adoptions

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    4
    I dont agree with adoption as i been there myself and im still v.confused why and feel that i will never be except and i have differculty in meaning of love and fear it because of lack of understanding. I got into wrong crowds but now im in a loving relatio lnship have children and slowly recovering im in my 30's. I would say keep this one then stop having children if you feel that way you feel. Very upseting.

  2. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,310
    As someone who was adopted (closed) and recently found their birth mother, I'd just like to say I wholeheartedly agree with adoption. My biological mother was only 15 when she got pregnant and both her parents had died, so I can't even imagine how hard her life would have been to keep me. She gave me to the most generous and loving couple I've ever met, and we were so close that people were shocked when my mom told them I was adopted. Now that I have met my biological mom, I have an even greater respect for my parents and keep in touch with my biological mom on occasion, but she is a great woman, and very thankful my parents adopted me.
    http://www.onceuponatimebabynames.com/
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    Due December 13, 2014 (12/13/14)
    Nelleke, Alianora, Castalia, Vasilisa, Indrina, Jilliana, Violetta, Ottilia, Olympia
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  3. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by 1982tapper View Post
    I dont agree with adoption as i been there myself and im still v.confused why and feel that i will never be except and i have differculty in meaning of love and fear it because of lack of understanding. I got into wrong crowds but now im in a loving relatio lnship have children and slowly recovering im in my 30's. I would say keep this one then stop having children if you feel that way you feel. Very upseting.

    well it wasn't exactly a planned pregnancy. your last two sentences makes me irritated. It's not that I don't want another child, because I do, sometime. It's about whats best for the baby. I don't want the child to grow up with two irresponsible parents (because honestly, yes we are) and a dad who struggles with drugs. But, it's my child and I want to do whatever I can for him/her, and who knows, maybe everything will work out in a year or two?
    It's just a very, very hard decision. And I'm trying to do whats best for all of us, but especially the baby.
    [B][CENTER][FONT=Fixedsys][SIZE=5]Mikayla[/SIZE][/FONT][/CENTER][/B]
    [CENTER][FONT=Fixedsys]mom to Parker Hermione
    due December 11 with #2
    [COLOR="#ff6699"]Nova Felicity[/COLOR] OR [COLOR="#3399cc"]Mason Phoenix[/COLOR][/CENTER][/FONT]

  4. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    238
    This is really long but I hope it's helpful! I am an adoptive mom of two sweet little ones born in the U.S.

    I think adoption is sometimes good, is sometimes the right choice, but isn't always. I think parents should have the right to make the decision that they think is best for their child and shouldn't be looked down on as long as that is a situation in which the child's needs are met and the child has a chance to grow up in a healthy, loving environment. If you find yourself considering adoption, you have to ask yourself, "Why?" What are the circumstances that are bringing the prospect of adoption to your mind? Are these things that you can change? If you feel overwhelmed by the thought of caring for an infant and raising a child, can you seek out parenting classes, experienced parents, etc.? If you are unsure about being able to ensure your child is fed and clothed etc., can you seek out community resources that provide these things in the short term while you work on a long term solution that allows you to provide those things for your child? If you have goals that would benefit you and your family in the long-term, are there ways that you can adapt those plans to include baby? If you are in an unhealthy relationship, is there a way you can get help and stay together, such as counseling, or would it be possible for you to get out of the bad relationship you're in and commit to staying out of such relationships in the future? If you are expecting a child with special needs, is there an organization you could contact to get support and information and connect with other moms about how to parent a child with that need? You may find that you can be prepared to care for your child with just a little assistance and creative planning. Or you may find that your situation is not something that you can welcome a child (or another child) into, or perhaps it's not in your other kids' best interests, and/or the best interests of the child on its way. There are plenty of legitimate reasons to choose adoption, and don't let anyone make you feel guilty if you assess your situation and feel that adoption is the best choice.

    There are a lot of reasons that a mom or a couple might choose adoption for her/their child. While waiting to adopt, we encountered a lot of different kinds of situations. Committed couples and single moms. People with many children, or one other child, or who were expecting their first. Moms over 40, moms under 20. Some healthy, others with health issues. Some with good relationships, some with complicated relationships. They were interested in adoption for all sorts of reasons. Sometimes they had difficult life situations they did not want to bring a child into. Sometimes they had other kids and knew they could not take care of another. Sometimes they were young and hopeful that they would be in a position to be parents one day, but not today. Sometimes they were older and felt their time to raise a child from birth had past. Whatever your situation, you can be sure that there are other people out there in a similar position.

    Even from the adoptive side, adoption is sometimes good but isn't always. A family considering adopting a child should also ask themselves, "Why?" Are you emotionally, mentally, physically and financially ready to care for a child (or another child or children)? Are you able to provide a child with positive examples of adoption (adult role models who were adopted, peers who were adopted, etc.)? If you have experienced infertility, have you emotionally healed from that experience? Do you have the ability to connect with and love a child who doesn't share your genetic material just as you would a biological child? Are you prepared for the birth family aspect (the unknowns of a closed option, the communication involved in a semi-open adoption, the face-to-face interactions of an open adoption)? Are you ready to answer your child's questions about adoption and help them form their identity in a healthy way? Are you prepared for strangers' questions about adoption? Do you expect that your child will be welcomed by friends and family? Have you considered other ways to help families in difficult situations or be part of adoption that might be a better choice for you? Adoption can be a great thing for a family who chooses adoption for the right reasons and is prepared for all the things that come with it, but it's not right for every family.

    The level of openness is a personal choice. Some birth parents choose to place with a relative or close friend and simply take on a different yet active role in their child's life. Some birth parents want a family that's close enough to meet up every so often. Other birth parents specifically want a family that lives out-of-state for maximum privacy and zero chance that you'd run into them at the grocery store or be friends with some of the same people. You have to know what is going to work for you and insist on it. Closed adoptions are very rare these days--most birth parents want to have an opportunity to choose and get to know the adoptive family, and most adoptive families want to get to know their child's birth family. Semi-open adoptions are the most common. With those, communication between birth families and adoptive families is usually regulated by the agency, so you don't share addresses or phone numbers or even last names most of the time, yet you are able to reach each other when you want to or need to (in addition to scheduled updates). Usually, birth families and adoptive families will talk and/or meet before the birth and at the hospital, but will not plan to meet in the future. This is a great option when birth and adoptive families both want to maintain some level of privacy but want to get to know each other and want to continue to communicate in the future. I think a semi-open arrangement can also be good if you have dangerous people in your life who you would not want to open up your mailbox and see a letter from your child's adoptive family and get their address, or who might follow you to a meeting with the child and his/her adoptive family. Open adoptions are another option. The amount of openness can vary a lot. It could mean one meeting a year, or one meeting every six months, or every few years, or all kinds of other levels of involvement. The important thing is to think about what types of contact you want to have in advance and make sure you find an adoptive family that wishes for the same contact. Be as specific as possible...what types of contact do you want (letters, phone calls, texts, emails, visits) and how often? What type of contact do you think will be best for your child? Be sure to choose a family you trust to carry out your agreement, whether that's respecting your privacy and not seeking you out, or sending letters and pictures on a schedule, or meeting up on a given frequency.

    I know a lot of families who have adopted. Some over 40, some in their early 20s. Some with many children, some with no children. Some experiencing infertility, others not. Various income levels. Various philosophies on raising kids. Pretty much all of the families I know are amazing parents who love their kids. They don't differentiate between "adopted" and "biological"...their kids are their kids. They adore their kids' birth families and are genuinely concerned about them and want the best for them. I have encountered some people seeking to adopt that I don't think are ready (marital struggles, haven't gotten over an infertility struggle, etc.), but most of the ones I've actually known are wonderful. They adore their kids, want the best for them, and keep the promises they've made to their kids and their kids' birth families, often going above and beyond to connect with their kids' birth families and make them feel loved and connected. I'm sure there are some not-so-great adoptive parents out there, but the great thing about domestic adoption today is you can choose the adoptive family that is right for your child. Families hoping to adopt prepare profile books to tell you about themselves, their families, their homes, their communities, why they want to adopt, etc. You can choose a family on the spot or call and interview a couple of them who might be a good fit. (Or, if you'd rather not choose, the agency can pick a family for you who is what you're looking for.)

    (Continued in another post.)

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    238
    (Continuation.)

    If I were choosing an adoptive family, I'd want to talk to them about adoption in general for a bit to make sure we were on the same page about how we viewed adoption, what we wanted our relationship to be like moving forward, etc. The right adoptive family will clearly respect you. They will be open and honest, not phony. They, too, will be looking for the right match, not one formed out of desperation on your part and/or theirs. You have to feel like you can trust the family you've chosen to parent that child to the best of their ability, because even in an open adoption, they'll ultimately be the ones making the decisions about how to raise the child from the time of placement. So you want to find someone who shares your values and who you trust will make good decisions with the child's best interest at heart. What traits about yourself do you like most and want for your child? What type of mom would you like to be? What type of dad would you choose for your kids? What type of life would you like them to have? Choose a family that is those things and is likely to be what you want your child to have.

    In order to be eligible to adopt, families have to complete a home study with a licensed social worker who assesses their ability and readiness to care for a child (or another child). Are they mentally, emotionally, physically, and financially able to care for a child? Do they understand what adoption is? Do they view adoption, adopted children, and birth families in a healthy way? Are they ready for a lifelong commitment? Are they in good health, and can they expect to be able to care for the child into adulthood? If something were to change in their situation in the future, do they have plans for how their children would be cared for? (A network of family and friends who can support them through a rough time, someone who could become the kids' parents/guardians if they both passed away, life insurance, disability insurance, savings, etc.). Social workers specifically assess families to determine how many kids they can handle, what ages, what special needs, if they are prepared to adopt outside their race/culture, etc. Adoptive families put a lot of time, money, and emotion into the process before they ever interact with an expectant mom considering adoption. I think the arduousness of the process itself tends to cut out a lot of (but not all) people who aren't committed, ready, etc.

    One last thought: Don't be afraid that the adoptive family won't treat the child "the same" or love them "the same" as they do/would a biological child. I promise you that I could not love anyone more than I love my kids! One thing I always remember...husbands and wives commit to each other for life and love each other more than anything, yet they do not do so because of a biological connection. We cherish our best friends, yet they aren't blood relatives either. So don't fear that the right family won't love your child the way you love them, the way you want them to be loved.

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