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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    586
    Plenty of women are induced unnecessarily, in the US more so than many other countries. The excessive medicalisation of childbirth there would worry me, quite frankly! I would go ahead and ask your care provider their stats. They should have nothing to hide anyway if they're good. We have midwifery-based model of maternity care in NZ but it is pretty standard to ask your midwife their stats on birth outcomes and rates of intervention. I asked at my first appointment, which is also standard. You want to know where you stand as soon as possible so that you have time to move to someone else if you don't like what you're hearing.

    Also, if you don't want a c-section, it is worth bearing in mind that you increase your likelihood of needing one if you have an epidural.
    Mother to miss Mila Arden and her brand new brother, Cato Bennett

  2. #8
    Chances are that if your OB/Midwife has a good record they will be thrilled to share it with you. At my very first appointment, my midwife told me that only 5% of their labors result in emergency c-section (I take it with a grain of salt since I know that they hand pick low risk patients, but its still a very good percentage). I'd say get all the information that you can now. It is much easier to switch doctors now than later and most of your visits are in the last 10 weeks anyways. My experience is that most doctors have opinions on how things should be done, but aren't so pushy that they aren't willing to work with reasonable requests.


    It is much easier to switch doctors now than later
    Mom to Henry, Mollie, Gideon, and expecting Clark Ebenezer in November.

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Currently on the west side of the U.S.
    Posts
    417
    @milasmama: See, that's more along the lines of the impression I've been under. I don't want to argue with anyone but it seems to me like lots of women are induced here in the U.S. for reasons that aren't considered critical to the health and safety of mom or baby. And I know inductions are more likely to end up in c-section. I also do know that having an epidural increases your risk of a c-section, that's why I said I'm "open to it" but I'm not necessarily including it in my plans. I know myself, and reality, well enough to know that it's something I'll have to decide at that time, based on how I'm feeling. I don't feel the need to try to ban it from even being possible, I'll play that by ear along with my husband and doctor.

    @skarbassoona: thanks for your thoughts! I know it's easier to switch now than later, that's why I'm trying to gather info now and get my nerve up. That way I'll be ready at my next appointment in a few weeks!
    Christine

    Pregnancy #1: lost to mc, 10/11

    Amelia Joelle arrived on 11/28/13 at 7 pounds, 4 ounces of pure beauty. Couldn't be happier to finally be mommy!

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,514
    Unfortunately, @milasmama, these are canards circulated as gospel truth by those in the natural childbirth community, but they suffer from being completely false.

    1) Having epidural analgesia does not stall out labor, nor does it increase the chance of c-section. This has been repeatedly proven by multiple high-level, good-quality studies, over the last decade. I think, since it contradicts a lot of dearly-held 'truths' by certain elements of the natural childbirth world, these studies are simply ignored.

    2) Most obstetricians do not perform social inductions, with rare exceptions (i.e. husband is being deployed for the military). The most common reasons to induce in the US are a) post-dates [which is backed up by sterling evidence showing a doubling of the rate of in-utero fetal demise from the 40th week to the 41st, and a tripling in the 42nd week] and b) worrisome growth scan or fetal compromise evident on NST & BPP and c) medical complication in the mother, most typically pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension or fetal macrosomia from gestational diabetes.

    3) Homebirth in low-risk women in the Netherlands has a higher death rate for babies than high-risk women delivered by Dutch obstetricians in the hospital. The Netherlands is significantly revisiting its practice model given the new data for baby death & lifelong disability that has come out since 2010.

    Are there unnecessary inductions? Doubtless! Are there c-sections performed where a healthy baby could have been delivered vaginally? For sure! The question is, which ones? Well, the only way you would know for 100% sure is if you could do it all over again, run both arms of the "experiment" at the same time (induction & no induction, vaginal birth & c-section) and see which outcome ensued. What we know is that 100% of babies who are actually in trouble act like they're in trouble, so by intervening when you see trouble, you catch all of them. However, a certain percentage of babies who are not in trouble act like they're in trouble temporarily, so by intervening when you see trouble, you're also catching them. Those are the unnecessary ones, but no one has a way to tell them apart, and most people (patients and practitioners alike) feel that it's worth erring on the side of caution.
    Blade, MD

    XY: Antoine Raphael
    XX: Cassia Viviane Noor

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Mireia * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Amal _ Hanan / Altair _ Fahd _ Ilyas _ Sajjad _ Saqr _ Tariq

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Currently on the west side of the U.S.
    Posts
    417
    @blade: I have heard a little bit about the changes in birthing in the Netherlands (my sister-in-law gave birth about 2 weeks ago, as well as about a year and a half ago, as have 4 of my cousins, so we've talked it quite a bit)... but their infant mortality rate was 3.69 in 2011 compared to our 5.9. And I'm not sure about comparing high risk births to low risk, that seems specious - but I get what you're saying. This is exactly why I wanted to start this conversation, because I knew there would be widely varying takes on it. My belief that the U.S. has gotten a bit off the path and can definitely learn from other first world countries won't change regardless - but I live here so I have to work with what I've got!

    Thanks everyone!
    Christine

    Pregnancy #1: lost to mc, 10/11

    Amelia Joelle arrived on 11/28/13 at 7 pounds, 4 ounces of pure beauty. Couldn't be happier to finally be mommy!

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