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  1. #11
    Thank you all! Looks like it's unanimous - that was my gut feeling, too.

    To answer questions, yes, we are planning to speak Greek at home (my husband can barely speak English anyhow! And she will learn English at school), but Katerina is the everyday Greek form, so there would be no confusion there.

    Blade, thanks for the reply! I'm not worried about her Eucharist name being muddled up. We're baptizing her in Greece anyhow, so her name will be Aikaterini (in Greek alphabet) on her baptismal certificate, not Katherine. I didn't mention this earlier, but my husband has some worries about "Katerina" translating to a Greek passport, but I think the Greek baptismal certificate should clear up any confusion (baptismal certificates are legal documents in Greece).

    Ugh, bilingual naming is such a headache! I really appreciate all of your feedback!
    Baby girl K.A.
    Born September 2013

    Guilty pleasures: Anastasia Isadora/Isidore Nicodemus Persephone Darrow Opaline Aurelia Chloe Mirabel Camelia Theodore Eugenia

  2. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by bellerose View Post
    Just go with Katerina!
    I am from Greece and I have my formal name Vassiliki on the birth certificate and I always hate it! I have to explain all the time that I go by Vasso or Bellerose.it's just make the things more complicate when you live in a different country.I will doubt your daughter will ever go by Aikaterini

    Best wishes and the combo Katerina Ariande is wonderful!
    If we have another girl, she will be Vasiliki!
    Baby girl K.A.
    Born September 2013

    Guilty pleasures: Anastasia Isadora/Isidore Nicodemus Persephone Darrow Opaline Aurelia Chloe Mirabel Camelia Theodore Eugenia

  3. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,519
    Quote Originally Posted by sixpomegranateseeds View Post
    Thank you all! Looks like it's unanimous - that was my gut feeling, too.

    To answer questions, yes, we are planning to speak Greek at home (my husband can barely speak English anyhow! And she will learn English at school), but Katerina is the everyday Greek form, so there would be no confusion there.

    Blade, thanks for the reply! I'm not worried about her Eucharist name being muddled up. We're baptizing her in Greece anyhow, so her name will be Aikaterini (in Greek alphabet) on her baptismal certificate, not Katherine. I didn't mention this earlier, but my husband has some worries about "Katerina" translating to a Greek passport, but I think the Greek baptismal certificate should clear up any confusion (baptismal certificates are legal documents in Greece).

    Ugh, bilingual naming is such a headache! I really appreciate all of your feedback!
    Is your family planning on living in the US, but purusing dual citizenship for the baby? If so, the names have to match up on both passports, correct?

    I don't pretend to have examined many Greek passports but I believe it is standard practice the world over for languages written in non-Roman script to write the bearer's name in the native script as well as a transliteration for borders & customs personel. Perhaps she could have Αικατερινη / KATERINA, even though it's not a direct transliteration?
    Blade, MD

    XY: AR
    XX: CVN

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Myrra * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Maysan _ Iman / Altair _ Fahd _ Faraj _ Khalil _ Najid _ Rafiq _ Tariq

  4. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post
    Is your family planning on living in the US, but purusing dual citizenship for the baby? If so, the names have to match up on both passports, correct?

    I don't pretend to have examined many Greek passports but I believe it is standard practice the world over for languages written in non-Roman script to write the bearer's name in the native script as well as a transliteration for borders & customs personel. Perhaps she could have Αικατερινη / KATERINA, even though it's not a direct transliteration?

    Yes, living in the U.S., but possibility of moving to Greece in the future. My dad's legal name here is John, but on his Greek passport he has Ioannis. But he came here 30 years ago, and from what I gather, procedures have become much more strict. Really, I don't know if she could have Aikaterini on her Greek passport if we put Katerina on her BC. She will have Greek citizenship automatically, as her father is a sole Greek citizen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_nationality_law

    I suppose the worst case scenario is that she would have Κατερινα on her Greek passport, which wouldn't be the end of the world.
    Baby girl K.A.
    Born September 2013

    Guilty pleasures: Anastasia Isadora/Isidore Nicodemus Persephone Darrow Opaline Aurelia Chloe Mirabel Camelia Theodore Eugenia

  5. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,146
    For what it's worth, if it is meaningful for you to put her full Greek name on her BC, and you do plan on her using it in certain realms of life, it would not be unheard of to have it on her BC.

    Where I'm from (and I live in the US) we all give our children Hebrew names (some more uncommon than others) and put that name on the BC. It's something that your daughter will get used to, and when asked about it will have a good, substantive story to tell.

    In general I'm not one to take religious traditions of naming lightly, so I'm sure that also taints my opinion on something like this.

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