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View Poll Results: How do you pronounce Evelyn?

Voters
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  • Eve-lyn (and I'm from US)

    6 8.96%
  • Ever-lyn (and I'm from US)

    10 14.93%
  • Eve-lyn (and I'm from UK)

    7 10.45%
  • Ever-lyn (and I'm from UK)

    9 13.43%
  • Eve-lyn (and I'm from Aus/NZ)

    0 0%
  • Ever-lyn (and I'm from Aus/NZ)

    4 5.97%
  • Eve-lyn (and I'm from somewhere else)

    3 4.48%
  • Ever-lyn (and I'm from somewhere else)

    3 4.48%
  • I pronounce it differently (comment how)

    25 37.31%
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Results 31 to 35 of 36
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Liverpool, England
    Posts
    3,620
    Quote Originally Posted by uselesskitty View Post
    I think I am learning to speak with a British accent thanks to Nameberry. Lol. I am learning so much about the accent just from name pronunciation!
    English accent you mean There is no British accent.

    Here, I've heard people use 'eev-lin', 'eveh-lin' and 'ev-lin' to say Evelyn. There doesn't seem to be a North/South divide to it either.

    Anyway, since Forvo is rapidly becoming my favourite place, I thought I'd attach a few sound clips to further clear up the confusion North American's are having regarding the description of Evelyn as 'ever-lyn'. Unfortunately I could only find clips of British people using the 'eev-lin' pronunciation but I think it all still works. Here we go...

    Generally, this is how an English person says 'forever' http://www.forvo.com/word/forever/#en ((Listen to Bananaman in particular)) See how it sounds like 'evah'? We don't tend to say the 'r' at the end of the word. It gets lost.*

    Now if you listen to Sugardaddy (an American) pronounce 'Evelyn' http://www.forvo.com/word/evelyn/#en ...the beginning part sounds nearly exactly the same. Therefore, since we English also use that sound for our pronunciation of 'ever' it's fairly logical that we'd write it that way when attempting to spell the sound made in 'Evelyn' phonetically.

    Hope this has helped!


    *There are American voices on that list too for comparison. You can definitely here the final 'r' in the majority of theirs.
    Last edited by renrose; May 10th, 2013 at 09:20 PM.
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  2. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,962
    Quote Originally Posted by renrose View Post
    English accent you mean There is no British accent.

    Here, I've heard people use 'eev-lin', 'eveh-lin' and 'ev-lin' to say Evelyn. There doesn't seem to be a North/South divide to it either.

    Anyway, since Forvo is rapidly becoming my favourite place, I thought I'd attach a few sound clips to further clear up the confusion North American's are having regarding the description of Evelyn as 'ever-lyn'. Unfortunately I could only find clips of British people using the 'eev-lin' pronunciation but I think it all still works. Here we go...

    Generally, this is how an English person says 'forever' http://www.forvo.com/word/forever/#en ((Listen to Bananaman in particular)) See how it sounds like 'evah'? We don't tend to say the 'r' at the end of the word. It gets lost.*

    Now if you listen to Sugardaddy (an American) pronounce 'Evelyn' http://www.forvo.com/word/evelyn/#en ...the beginning part sounds nearly exactly the same. Therefore, since we English also use that sound for our pronunciation of 'ever' it's fairly logical that we'd write it that way when attempting to spell the sound made in 'Evelyn' phonetically.

    Hope this has helped!


    *There are American voices on that list too for comparison. You can definitely here the final 'r' in the majority of theirs.

    Haha, there's no such thing as an English accent either! I think most Americans think of a 'British' accent as either the typical south/south eastern accent or the BBC-newsreader-old-Etonian-yes-I've-got-a-degree-in-Classics-from-Cambridge accent

    I agree with everything you've said though However, Forvo doesn't have Evelyn pronounced the way I say it!


    This talk of accents just reminded me of one of my favourite Young Ones sketches- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxA0a5G6ccg :P
    William ♠ Thomas ♠ Peter ♠ Henry ~ Rose ♠ Alice ♠ Ivy ♠ Lowenna
    Mowesi ~ Henwyn Kernewek ~ Mebyon

  3. #35
    It's my grandmother's name and we pronounce it Ev-uh-lyn with the middle syllable said quite quickly.

    I generally pronounce ever as ev-uh but with the emphasis on the second syllable so if I read "ever lyn" aloud it would sound quite different than Evelyn. I'm from the US.

  4. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Liverpool, England
    Posts
    3,620
    Quote Originally Posted by charlieandperry1 View Post
    Haha, there's no such thing as an English accent either! I think most Americans think of a 'British' accent as either the typical south/south eastern accent or the BBC-newsreader-old-Etonian-yes-I've-got-a-degree-in-Classics-from-Cambridge accent
    Yeah, RP accent. This is the one I meant.
    ~Boys~

    Jory Leander Atticus, August Eli Benedict, Casimir Mordecai Stewart,
    Edmond John Meirion, Horatio Ethell Emery, Bram William Jasper,
    Julian Remy Charles, Vasiliy Lochlan Michael.


    ~Girls~

    Aira Rose ___, Eleni Fiorella Charlotte, Sylvia Sayuri Noor,
    Merit Eleanora Adelaide, Clover Elodie Seraphine, Bridie Scarlett Viola,
    Marguerite Cecilia Iris, Eilidh Clara Valentine.


    Beta read The Self Invention: 18 is up. Two more to follow within the next week.

  5. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    436
    I'm from the UK and I pronounce it 'ev-uh-lin'. I voted for the fourth option though because when I said the word 'ever' I, and most people from the UK, don't stress the 'r' sound. So 'ever' sounds like 'ev-uh'.
    ~ 20 year-old name lover ~

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