Names Searched Right Now:
Page 9 of 16 FirstFirst ... 7 8 9 10 11 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 45 of 78
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by daisy451 View Post
    @shvibziks I don't think there's anything pretentious about naming your child after a book that you LOVE- really, truly love. But how is it possible that so many people's favorite characters or favorite books are TKAM and Catcher in the Rye? With the entirety of literature, THOSE are the two everyone on earth seems to love. And I think there's a big difference between Atticus/Holden/Keats and Lee/Ray/Juliet (As in Harper, Bradbury, and Romeo &.) With the latter, the names pay homage to the books/authors, but they're common enough that they aren't exclusively associated with those authors.
    First of all, I don't really understand why it's surprising that certain books are the favourite of many people. TKAM is one of the most celebrated books in the history of American literature - of course it's popular.

    Second, although I personally would rather choose a name that wasn't strongly tied to one famous person, whether an author, historical figure, celebrity or literary character, if I read you correctly you're basically saying that it's only ok to choose names that don't have a very strong association with any character or person unless that person or character is extremely important to you. I don't agree with that. As others have said, once you start categorizing reasons behind the choice of name as ok or 'too pretentious' or 'too' anything else, well, it's akin to saying that only certain reasons for choosing a name are acceptable or beyond reproach, and that's problematic. I think many people see the names they choose as a reflection of their taste and social status, but there's no rule that says the names you choose have to have some deep personal meaning for you. Sometimes it's the aesthetics and practical considerations that make people choose one name among many they like, and if there is an association with an admired literary character, author or historical figure then they consider that a bonus.

    I understand what you're talking about, truly - I think some people are trying so hard to be different or counter-culture or retro or literary-sounding that they possibly lose sight of whether or not they really like a name based on its own merits. A name like Salinger would strike me as a bit silly, I admit. But at this point, names like Beckett, Harper and Atticus are out there in circulation, and the literary associations may or may not be among the top reasons why a particular parent decides to use one of them.

  2. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    442
    If they choose it because the love the name, then that's ok. I do think some choose the names just because they are pretentious.

  3. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    SD, CA
    Posts
    360
    It seems to me that the parents naming the child after an author or a character in a book are not being pretentious. The parents genuinely love the name and probably feel an attachment to the character or to the author. I have a much bigger problem with the judgmental attitude other people here have towards these parents and these names. Trying to pick apart the reasoning behind the choice of the name and then insulting and judging the parents' choice feels a lot more snobbish to me than a parent naming a child Harper or Holden.
    Mama to
    Desmond Sanders, born 7/2013
    and dog son, Lambeau

  4. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by celianne View Post
    Yes, but why assume that that's the intent? Why does it have to be based in something so shallow and spiteful? Why can't it be a statement of love instead, or values, or interest?

    How is this so different from using any other name? How is it worse than choosing a name because 'it's pretty,' instead of having a good story, a good meaning behind it?
    I wouldn't always assume that that's the intent, but with other naming options to get across the same love of an author/character, if a parent chooses something like Salinger with such an obvious tie and little history of use as a first name, then it's reasonable to think that they have deliberately chosen that name to signal to all that they love Salinger and have read everything by Salinger. Especially as I believe it's important for parents to consider how easy the name will be for their child to live with (& it would be harder to be a Keats than a John). That's why very obviously literary names seem pretentious to me. With that said, I definitely don't think pretentiousness is the worst thing in the world! I would agree that it is better than choosing a name solely because it is pretty. Names should certainly have good meanings behind them, so if someone can only do that through something obviously literary, then that's better than just another little Isabella. I think maybe what people are disagreeing on here is whether being pretentious is such a bad thing!
    Last edited by caroline147; May 9th, 2013 at 10:56 AM.

    Annora Juliet, Elspeth, Verity, Zelda, Josephine, Marianne, Rosemary Constance
    Edmund Henry, Wesley, Jonah, Gilbert, August, Winston, Hugh Theodore

  5. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    879
    Quote Originally Posted by caroline147 View Post
    I wouldn't always assume that that's the intent, but with other naming options to get across the same love of an author/character, if a parent chooses something like Salinger with such an obvious tie and little history of use as a first name, then it's reasonable to think that they have deliberately chosen that name to signal to all that they love Salinger and have read everything by Salinger. Especially as I believe it's important for parents to consider how easy the name will be for their child to live with (& it would be harder to be a Keats than a John). That's why very obviously literary names seem pretentious to me. With that said, I definitely don't think pretentiousness is the worst thing in the world! I would agree that it is better than choosing a name solely because it is pretty. Names should certainly have good meanings behind them, so if someone can only do that through something obviously literary, then that's better than just another little Isabella.I think maybe what people are disagreeing on here is whether being pretentious is such a bad thing!
    Being pretentious is a bad thing by definition. If you want to change the connotation, you need a new word.

    I simply don't find it at all pretentious, unless the parents care more about their image than their child, in which case they have bigger problems. Naming a child DRIECTLY after the person you WANT to name them after isn't pretentious by itself, as can be seen by the favorable reactions to others' use of family names, nature names, and names with generally good meanings. The argument seems to be that using literature or culture specifically as your source/reason is pretentious.

    And I can see it in this sense: You have likely never met this person, this author, and there is no way you have met their characters. You are choosing a name based on something that is inherently indirect, and could easily be wrongly perceived. Because you don't know this author, you don't really know who you are naming your child after. You are naturally ill-informed. The assumption made is that you DO know what you're doing when you name your child, because you know this author through their books and you admire their characters who don't exist. But you don't. It's a fact more than an opinion; you may feel like you know them, but it simply isn't the case.

    What's pretentious is saying 'yes, I named my child after someone reputable and wonderful' when most writers are quite the opposite. This is what would bother me.

    But using a name because you love it, and you love what it says about your family, and you love where it came from, is not pretentious. That's normal.
    Last edited by celianne; May 9th, 2013 at 01:07 PM. Reason: forgot word
    I'm not feeling incredibly profound at the moment. Check back later.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •