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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    New England
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    Mnmemily15- I did a lot of googling to find the above, and some states allow or let it slide on birth certificates. But it's a no-go on social security cards and passports.
    Little Bean arriving September 2014

    Zoe | Noemí Esther
    Lucas Emmanuel | Levi Alexander

    Adele | Adira | Arabella | Aurora | Eliana | Elizabeth | Milena | Susannah | Zara

  2. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Emerald City
    Posts
    508
    Oh I love these fun extra little marks on letters! Americans are generally stupid of other languages. I think it's out of sheer ignorance that we don't allow accent marks (ñ and n are extremely different, but that is very very tricky); since we tend to read at a 5th grade level, keeping those marks out really levels the playing field. I've studied Hebrew, Spanish, French, and Latin, and I still can't get all the little marks right (try Hebrew vowels for a real trip).
    Attachment 1416
    I love them though, and Søren is 100% cooler than just ol' Soren. I honestly have no idea when or how to use æ and œ IRL with American English, but in a name, they intrigue me greatly.
    Last edited by poppy528; May 8th, 2013 at 02:55 AM.
    “And remember, my sentimental friend, that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others.” L. Frank Baum, The Wizard of Oz

  3. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Great Lakes
    Posts
    1,480
    Quote Originally Posted by poppy528 View Post
    Oh I love these fun extra little marks on letters! Americans are generally stupid of other languages. I think it's out of sheer ignorance that we don't allow accent marks (ñ and n are extremely different, but that is very very tricky); since we tend to read at a 5th grade level, keeping those marks out really levels the playing field. I've studied Hebrew, Spanish, French, and Latin, and I still can't get all the little marks right (try Hebrew vowels for a real trip).
    Attachment 1416
    I love them though, and Søren is 100% cooler than just ol' Soren. I honestly have no idea when or how to use æ and œ IRL with American English, but in a name, they intrigue me greatly.
    The average reading level of American adults is 7th-8th grade. Not sure where you got your 5th grade stat but it's wrong. Please stop trying to make Americans look stupid (Americans are generally stupid of other languages.) There's a difference between ignorance and stupidity. You can claim that Americans are ignorant of other languages and I would not disagree with you about that.

    In the UK, nearly half the workforce has a reading level expected of children leaving primary school.

    ETA: There's a mention of diacritics in this paper:

    Prohibitions of accent marks and other diacritical marks are common. For example, the California Office of Vital Records provides a handbook to county vital records departments that states birth names can be recorded using only "the 26 alphabetical characters of the English language with appropriate punctuation if necessary." The handbook further specifies that "no pictographs, ideograms, diacritical marks" (including é, ñ, and ç) are allowed. Hence the prohibition of "Lucía" discussed in the Introduction. Kansas imposes similar restrictions. In Massachusetts, the "characters have to be on the standard American Keyboard. So dashes and apostrophes are fine, but not accent marks and the such." New Hampshire prohibits all special characters other than an apostrophe or dash. Accordingly, "O'Connor" is a permissible name in New Hampshire, but "Chacón" is not.
    Last edited by scarletrune; May 8th, 2013 at 08:51 AM.
    ** The opinions expressed above are not meant to be reflective of Nameberry as a whole but are my opinion and mine alone. **

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  4. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Liverpool, England
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    3,620
    Quote Originally Posted by scarletrune View Post
    In the UK, nearly half the workforce has a reading level expected of children leaving primary school.
    What have we got to do with this? O_o

    Poppy is an American I believe as she said 'we' when referencing the States.
    ~Boys~

    Jory Leander Atticus, August Eli Benedict, Casimir Mordecai Stewart,
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    Beta read The Self Invention: 18 is up. Two more to follow within the next week.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Great Lakes
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    1,480
    Quote Originally Posted by renrose View Post
    What have we got to do with this? O_o

    Poppy is an American I believe as she said 'we' when referencing the States.
    I only used the UK as a reference. I believe the average reading level in Canada is higher than both countries but I am having a hard time finding a good source for Canada.
    ** The opinions expressed above are not meant to be reflective of Nameberry as a whole but are my opinion and mine alone. **

    Mommy to:
    Henry Nathaniel (3) and Julia Paige (1)

    Current favorites:
    Bennett - Emmett - Felix - Oliver - Owen - Preston - Samuel
    Abigail - Claire - Clara - Hope - Lydia - Maude - Molly

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