Names Searched Right Now:
Page 25 of 27 FirstFirst ... 15 23 24 25 26 27 LastLast
Results 121 to 125 of 132
  1. #121
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    3,941
    Dantea - thanks for listing those. I've never bothered to look up the Greek Gods and Goddesses because I was so obsessed with them when I was a teen - so looking them up on a name-site seemed unnecessary- but I think the problems you pointed out are all fairly obvious even to the most cursory knowledge and definitely could do with a sprucing up to reflect and honor an ancient religion like yours.
    Eros could also be listed as the god of emotional and physical love if that makes it more palatable to a general audience.
    The English word erotic is derived from the Greek eros (you can look this up in the Chambers Dictionary of Etymology) which makes this addition in particular all the more desirable.
    Last edited by lexiem; April 22nd, 2013 at 01:52 PM.
    CONSTRUCTION ZONE!!!
    maybe Endora, Dexter, Gideon & Lorelei
    Newlywed (Not TTC...yet)

  2. #123
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5
    Dantea- you beat me to it. I was going to post about Persephone and Artemis, I love those names and it bothers me so much. "All weak things"- seriously? No, just no.
    BTW I Love Persephone Elysia Willow! So beautiful!
    My Cupcake: Daisha
    Family Pets: Azula and Batgirl

    Sherlock, Doctor Who, Jane Austen, Merlin, Luther, (I was born in the wrong country...)

    Ladies: Alice, Daisha, Lila/Lilia, Danielle, Zella, Freya, Romana, Victoria, Madge, Persephone, Elisabeth, River, Sarah-Jane, Amelia-Rose, Maeve, Daphne
    Gents: Dashiell, Daniel, Zane, Matthew, David, Rhys, Oliver, Henry, Theodore, Felix, Bowen, Derek, Apollo, Baker, Zephyr, Rylan, Morgan, Callen, Robert, Rupert

  3. #125
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    3,941
    Names on Nameberry that have been listed as German but would be more accurately described as Germanic:

    Adelaide (F) -
    Adelaide is the English/French version of the German name Adelheid.

    Adela (F) -
    Adela is Ancient Germanic. The famous St Adela from the 7th century was a Frankish Princess.

    Adelia (F) -
    Portuguese/Italian variation of Adela/Adele. (behindthename.com & vorname.com)

    Alice (F) -
    This is another name with Germanic origins, it seems to be a English variant of the German Adelheid or Heidi. (behindthename.com & vorname.com)

    Amilia (F) -
    Vornamen.de has this listed as Dutch version of Emilia.

    Anastasie (F) -
    This is so close to the Russian Anastasia I'm not sure why it pops up under German origin names. Just FYI: Stasi is not a positive term to most Germans as it was the abbreviation used for the Ministry for State Security (or the East German Police). This might be a reason it's hard to find information on German origins on the name now though - it would probably sound too Russian and oppressive.

    Haldis (F) -
    vorname.com and baby-vornamen.de both list Haldis as a Scandinavian name.

    Vischer (M) -
    the translation to "fisherman" seems unlikely since the correct German spelling is Fischer. I'd be interested in your sources for this name since it would have to be a form of archaic German that'd I'd love to learn more about.


    Abelard (M) -
    I searched Vorname.com, behidnthename.com and baby-vornamen.de. None of these sites list this name. However, vorname.com and baby-vornamen.de list Abelarda (f) and Abelardo (m) as italian in origin.

    Abt (M) -
    This is a German masculine world referring to the Abbot at a Monastery. (Duden.de) I however, was not able to find evidence that this was used as a name in Germany - which considering the restrictions on naming that were in place till a few years ago would seem surprising if it was in fact a german name.

    Adelio (M) -
    I just assume this is the male version of Adelia which is Italian/Portuguese. How is Adelio then German?

    Agedius (M) -
    Aegedius is listed on behindthename.com as late Roman.

    Amory (M/F) -
    from the french Amaury. The German male equivalent is listed by baby-vornamen.de as Emmerich.

    Baer (M) -
    behindthename.com suggests its Limburgish vorname.de and baby-vornamen.de do not list it although it is the German word for Bear. (Which would make sense because until very recently it probably would not have been considered an appropriate name for a person by the German government.)

    Berlin (M) -
    The translation to the word borderline seems incorrect. According to Onomastik.com/on_geschichte_berlin the area that is now the German Capital can be traced to the word-root brl- that can be understood as "swamp" and the typical location suffix ending of -n. Which would make Berlin the Town by the Swamp.

    Names found with different spellings: Alfried and Alwar (both of these make more sense to the German language but I couldn't find evidence that Alfrid or Alvar were not german).
    Last edited by lexiem; April 23rd, 2013 at 03:22 PM.
    CONSTRUCTION ZONE!!!
    maybe Endora, Dexter, Gideon & Lorelei
    Newlywed (Not TTC...yet)

  4. #127
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,763
    Hi Dantea -- I'm going to revisit all the names you listed. In some cases, we won't add every single thing the deity is god of, not to be disrespectful but in the interest of brevity and focus on the name itself. Dantea, I would seriously love it if you would write a guest blog for us giving lots more detail on all these names! It's such an interesting topic and you are definitely the expert.

    And just to let everyone know, you are going to see big changes on Nameberry over the next few weeks, so forgive us if we don't have time to address individual name issues asap.
    Pam Satran
    Nameberry

  5. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,763
    Dantea, I've devoted the past two hours to making most of the changes you suggested. A few notes: the erroneous "feather" meaning for Pan was because of a glitch in our system that combines two origins and meanings of a name as in the books to a single entity with the first origin and the last meaning -- big mistake! We've had to catch those by trial and error so glad we finally tracked this one down.

    On Dionysius, this spelling is in fact not just our error in adding an extra i but a Romanized spelling widely used throughout the centuries.

    On Persephone, I remember making those changes before and I'm not sure what happened, but I remade them. I'm sorry but most authoritative sources do list "bringing death" or murder or destruction as a possible meaning so I had to include that, but I also included your interpretation and changed the main meaning.

    Let me know if I've missed anything. As I've told you before, I am happy to address your concerns.
    Pam Satran
    Nameberry

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •