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  1. #96
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    Sep 2012
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    Hilarious Juliet.a. This polite Audrey look he's sporting is about the furthest thing from his wild male rock&roll persona. I'd like to see Iggy in some kind of sexy, destroyed purple dress, with a shock of dark lipstick. Poor man always looks like he was left to die in a desert.

  2. #98
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Brit in Nova Scotia :)
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    2,890
    Quote Originally Posted by east93 View Post
    Telling a child "You're so pretty! Oh you're gorgeous! Hi pretty girl!" are far more leading to that mindset than pedicures.

    I think the concept that being girly is degrading is more damaging than nail polish, and lip gloss. Girls primp more for other girls than for boys. Half the things women love to wear, men find ridiculous. It's other women that notice and comment on it.


    I see more girls now being less princessy and more, all-rounded. What bothers me the most is the assumption that if a girl likes to primp, she must have low-self esteem issues, and doesn't value herself enough. Or that she's probably overly sexual, or lacking in substances.
    That's an unfair judgement, and discriminating imo.

    If a girl does boyish things, it's great! But if a girl does girly things, oh lets hurry and distract her. Girls like what they like, and they have that right. It's far more than spa parties, and glittery things that lead girls into doing overly sexual acts at a young age.
    I think it's a combination of the two which creates a problem actually (if we're using spa parties to symbolise the concept and cultural tendency of placing all little girls' worth/value on their appearances): a mixture of both telling little girls they should look pretty and then limiting and stereotyping them because of it.
    Jemima Rosemary - Eilidh Briar - Fenella Beatrix ✿ Alec Huw - Emmett Nicholas - Rufus Caspian
    Billie, Magdalena, Imogen, Octavia, Ailbhe, Jessa, Raphaela, Agnes, Imogen, Amelia, Medora, Lettice, Annabella.
    Dylan, Breccan, Rhett, Oscar, Ingram, Harrison, William, Vincent, Wolfie, Keaton.

    ✿✿✿

    Traveller at heart and dreaming of future babes, but mostly I'm just an expat teenage girl from England...http://bigsistercomplex.tumblr.com/


  3. #100
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,109
    Humans have been naming their offspring for millions of years, names have come into existence and then faded away forever, historical usage of names varies by tribe, sect, province, religion, "fads," etc. How arrogant can we be to think our generation gets to decide what is female and what is male? For all we know, 200 years from now kids could be answering to numbers and random words from the English language that aren't in use anymore. Why do Native American languages have no grammatical gender? Their pool of names is based on the child's attributes, physical characteristics, time/place of birth, totem animal, etc. Why must names have a gender attached to them?
    My cherished daughter, Rowan Jane. ~b. 10/2011~


    Sawyer ~ Aven ~ Elowen ~ Sage ~ Eilonwy ~ Eleanor
    Morgan ~ Asher ~ ___ ~ ___ ~ Currently trying to fill the blanks...


    Trying for #2 in January 2014.

  4. #102
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by rowangreeneyes View Post
    See, that sounds incredibly narrow minded and conservative to me. It's like saying "Dresses are meant for girls. Pants are meant for boys." I find it almost laughable how someone can be adamantly against something like masculine names for girls. I'm adamantly against war, adamantly against child abuse... I dislike super trendy names but I don't find them reprehensible. It seems like such wasted energy to debate this topic over and over, and it's silly. Honestly, when someone has such a huge issue with the gender of names, it makes me think of ultra conservatives clutching at straws to argue against women in the workplace, abortion rights, etc. "We need to keep things traditionally masculine and feminine, or the world will fall into TOTAL CHAOS and we won't know who's a man or a woman! Boys will be mistaken for girls on job applications! We'll forget what gender is and the world will be thrown off kilter and then... THE APOCALYPSE."

    Do you honestly think any parent of a girl named Logan or Mason intended to be "anti-woman" or strike up a 10 page long debate about gender, sexuality, and feminism? No. They just liked the name and thought it was cool. And I bet you they would of considered the same name if their baby girl had been a boy. I have a unisex name that at one point was strictly masculine, and when I asked my mom what she would of named me if I had been a boy, the same thing. I was NEVER teased about my name or treated differently, it never made me feel less feminine than my friends. I like the name Sawyer for a girl, and I also like it for a boy. Same goes with *most* of the names on my list.
    I find it interesting that you view it as narrow minded.
    Naming a girl Michael, for example, sends out the message that "You're better off having people thing you're a boy, and having a boy name than a girl's name like Michaela or Michelle." in my opinion.

    If such conversations seem like a waste, then don't participate. I find it interesting and I enjoy discussing this subject so I participate. Do I participate with the intention to change other people's minds and opinions? No, I don't at all. I participate to share and communicate. I don't view it as a waste of time to discuss something I find interesting.

    I really don't understand how the comparison of boys names on girls is equaling to being against women in the workplace, abortion rights, and women not wearing pants...
    names =/= pants, abortion, and workplace politics
    I didn't say anything keeping things (which is coming across as a generalizing word referring to other subjects outside of names) traditionally masculine and feminine, I'm referring to names. I resent the fact that you're jumping to extremes.
    There's no reason for a girl to be named Andrew, when there's Andrea/Andria/Andriana.

    See that's it right there, "...thought it was cool.", yet a boy named Dana is more likely to be cringed at then thought of as "cool". Even though Dana is a boys/unisex name, and Logan/Mason are not unisex.
    Boys names on girls sends out the message that a girl is better off with a boys name than a girls name. The added fact that most parents I've encountered have intentionally picked a boys name for their daughters because they think it'll be beneficial just adds to it.
    I have an issue with that.

    I find it interesting that you think it's limiting to leave boys names for boys, and girls names for girls. There are an abundance of names in the world, plus the added category of unisex names. There's no need for a girl to have a boys name, or a boy to have a girls name.

    I also don't think a girl named Michael would be made fun of by her peers either, the children I'm around are very open-minded and don't think about names much at all.
    I'm not here to tell you what to like and not to like, I'm simply sharing my opinion on the concept of boys names on girls, and why I disagree with it.

    I find it interesting that you seem take such personal offense to this topic, it's not directed to you personally at all. I have no issue with you.
    If this discussion is a waste of time, and your opinion is set, then don't participate and agree to disagree.

  5. #104
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliviasarah View Post
    I think it's a combination of the two which creates a problem actually (if we're using spa parties to symbolise the concept and cultural tendency of placing all little girls' worth/value on their appearances): a mixture of both telling little girls they should look pretty and then limiting and stereotyping them because of it.
    Interesting.

    Would say then the solution would be to stop telling girls they're pretty, and avoid any form of praise of appearance?
    Laurel - 2O - Aries - Slytherin - University of Toronto



    -------
    Newest thoughts for little ones: Angelo - Caspian - Eden | Isabela - Brisa - Gisele

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