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  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmabobemma View Post
    And on the other end of the spectrum, there are the Bella names, and the epidemic of little girls getting more and more princessified/objectified. Pedicure parties for six year olds, bl*w-j*b parties for teenagers...
    I'm a bit confused by this post...
    I don't see anything wrong with six year olds having their toe nails painted...nor how that's going to lead to sexual parties as a teenager.

    I see far more girls being allowed to express themselves how they like, or being ushered into non-girly girl things than the opposite. Then again, I don't live in NYC.
    Laurel - 21 - Toronto





  2. #73
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    Sep 2012
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    ^^ Yes, my post is probably confusing. It's late here, and I overshared I suppose. I may erase it. East93, you don't notice little girls getting more and more disneyfied, wearing sparkly pink stuff more than 10 years ago? There's this thing of "spa parties" for little girls here that I find really disturbing, because it's sending little girls the message that they need to worry about their appearance. What a bore! They should be climbing trees, reading books, playing make-believe, not obsessing about primping! As for the other thing I mentioned, I have a friend who teaches sex-ed to kids, and says it's a real problem. There's a culture of gratuitous bl*wj*bs among teens and pre-teens, where girls are getting nothing, but feel obligated to perform... I do think this points to a lack of self-respect that comes from being told over and over that you're valued for your looks, for the things that make you valuable to men.

  3. #75
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    Apr 2012
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    Every time a debate like this arises on Nameberry (which is very often,) I start contemplating two things...

    1) Where is the end to this argument? What do the people who are so adamantly against "boys names on girls" plan to do about it other than not name their daughter a boyish name? Name their son Jessica? What is the point of going around in circles and over analyzing everything?

    2) Why posters asking about a unisex or boy name on a girl get responses like "_____ is a boy's name!" or "I wouldn't use it because it sounds too masculine." And then a post about someone naming their daughter Elizabeth for the gazillionth time gets responses like "Oh that's such a beautiful combo!" and "What a gorgeous name for a little girl!" Double standards I guess. Although it does kind of suck to be in the super minority on Nameberry and *GASP* like unisex and masculine names on girls.

    Also, when does a name go from masculine to culturally accepted as a unisex name? Take Riley as an example. Riley for girls didn't even breach the top 1000 until 1990. Riley was a common boys name since 1912. And now we don't even bat an eye at a girl named Riley/Rilee/Rhylee (other than it being too popular) Isn't Riley the "Maxwell" of the early 1990's? A name gets super common for boys, and then ultimately someone decides to use it for a girl. It isn't a new trend. It's happened to hundreds of names throughout history. So are we finally going to be the generation to break the mold and start using girls names for boys? Probably not. There will be little girls named William and Benjamin in the next decade or so, and eventually we're just going to have to either accept it as a part of human psychology or we change it.
    My cherished daughter, Rowan Jane. ~b. 10/2011~


    Sawyer ~ Aven ~ Elowen ~ Sage ~ Eilonwy ~ Eleanor
    Morgan ~ Asher ~ ___ ~ ___ ~ Currently trying to fill the blanks...


    Trying for #2 in January 2014.

  4. #77
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    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmabobemma View Post
    ^^ Yes, my post is probably confusing. It's late here, and I overshared I suppose. I may erase it. East93, you don't notice little girls getting more and more disneyfied, wearing sparkly pink stuff more than 10 years ago? There's this thing of "spa parties" for little girls here that I find really disturbing, because it's sending little girls the message that they need to worry about their appearance. What a bore! They should be climbing trees, reading books, playing make-believe, not obsessing about primping! As for the other thing I mentioned, I have a friend who teaches sex-ed to kids, and says it's a real problem. There's a culture of gratuitous bl*wj*bs among teens and pre-teens, where girls are getting nothing, but feel obligated to perform... I do think this points to a lack of self-respect that comes from being told over and over that you're valued for your looks, for the things that make you valuable to men.
    I agree with you about girls feeling obligated to do certain things and boys never feel like they are obligated to do anything, women's sexual needs are pushed aside while men are portrayed as ravenous, insatiable, animals who just have a biological urge to mate. I think biologically, as animals, males of the species are generally the "sex fiends" because males have a drive to reproduce with many females, while females are generally more "picky" when it comes to choosing a mate because she is seeking the most virile male to reproduce with. Don't we see this same situation in nature ALL the time? Don't females in most other species "groom" themselves to be more attractive to males? It always seems to be the people trying to be so violently feminist and against stereotypes are the ones frowning upon "girly" things. Little girls who like spa parties and pink clothes are poor little misguided girls who society is cramming these ideas into their heads, they should be outside climbing trees and doing boy things because little girls getting their nails painted obviously would rather be outside playing in the mud. Differences between males and females are there for biological reasons, and not everything is a social experiment being manipulated by advertising and the entertainment industry. It all just seems like a big pile of hypocrisy to me. I'm not an overly frilly person, but I enjoy "female" things like getting my hair done, make up, facials, pedicures, etc, because I enjoy them. Period. And if those things make me more attractive to my mate... Good.
    My cherished daughter, Rowan Jane. ~b. 10/2011~


    Sawyer ~ Aven ~ Elowen ~ Sage ~ Eilonwy ~ Eleanor
    Morgan ~ Asher ~ ___ ~ ___ ~ Currently trying to fill the blanks...


    Trying for #2 in January 2014.

  5. #79
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    Apr 2012
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    I agree east93,

    What your Mum said makes perfect sense to me! As does Blade's overall response.

    I think that its exactly what everyone has been saying, people should balance out their children's names, rather slanting it so heavily one way. There are boys names I love that I worry wouldn't be acceptable in this day and age because to everyone else they sound "soft." For example, Ambrose, which I do still adore. Like what was mentioned by people commenting on the article or blog entry, names such as Leslie and Carol began female, and shifted back and forth over the course of history. So sometimes the demographics play a part in what is appropriate in which country - making the lines a tad more blurry. As one of the commenters mentioned he is a Sasha living in the United States who was bullied because his name was a "girl's name." I love Linden too, but due to the popular of females using Lindsey, I doubt I'll ever be bold enough to use it. I think Blade's point is valid, it seems as though there are countless restrictions on what is deemed appropriate for a little boy, but not what's appropriate for a little girl. Maybe its because of a homophobic attitude in society, I don't know, but it does seem unfair that some test the boundary with girl's names, and boys names are being swallowed up. Ultimately, its the parents decisions, and it doesn't impact how much nice the kids are, obviously. For me, if I ever do use a unisex name for my daughter it'll be a family name, used as a middle name, and probably balanced out by my other girly favourite names (mainly because that's usually just my taste.) That being said just because its my taste doesn't mean its everyone's, so I try to be open minded, and its very rare for me to comment on someone else's post saying "Don't name your child that!"

    I don't think the comments in the post though really put the argument to a close or gave an insight into what should be done. Plus I think with celebrities doing, many people of course then believe its appropriate.

    It's a tough one, I'll admit. I get where all of you are coming from.
    Last edited by sodallas3; April 10th, 2013 at 10:20 AM.

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