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  1. #111
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    Jan 2013
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    Surrey, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by east93 View Post
    I think I'm going to compile a list of names that should be considered truly unisex, and equally appropriate for use on boys and girls.
    Could you put Ashley on that list?

  2. #113
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Australia
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    And i am pretty sure Lindsay was traditionally a girls name that can now be used on boys? correct me if i am wrong. [/QUOTE]

    Lindsay was traditionally a male name, to my knowledge. It was my great grandfathers name
    Eliza Madeleine . Ronan Seth
    Amalia Hazel . Ewan Alexander

  3. #115
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Liverpool, England
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    Quote Originally Posted by clairedelune View Post
    This thread really hits home for me as not too long ago I was considering the name Ashley for my son. Being afraid of how others would treat him, I took it off my list. It is still my most favorite boys name and I feel it would be an injustice by giving him a middle name I love more than his first name. In saddens me because technically Ashley is a unisex name, but because if its past popularity, most people would turn their noses up at it on a boy. However, lately I've been feeling more confident about using it ( especially after reading this thread) so I may just use it in the first spot after all...but again it all comes back to the teasing potential...I will be following this thread for a while. Maybe it will help me make up my mind once and for all about Ashley :/
    Hop across the pond and call your son Ashley here. No one will bat an eyelid
    ~Boys~

    Jory Leander Atticus, August Eli Benedict, Casimir Mordecai Stewart,
    Edmond John Meirion, Horatio Ethell Emery, Bram William Jasper,
    Julian Remy Charles, Vasiliy Lochlan Michael.


    ~Girls~

    Aira Rose ___, Eleni Fiorella Charlotte, Sylvia Sayuri Noor,
    Merit Eleanora Adelaide, Clover Elodie Seraphine, Bridie Scarlett Viola,
    Marguerite Cecilia Iris, Eilidh Clara Valentine.


    Sorry to anyone who read TSI. First draft was terrible. Second drafting now.

  4. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Xi'An, China
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    I also did not have time to read all (now 12 pages) of responses, but I found it quite interesting. I teach anthropology, English, and U.S. History at a university in China (although I'm trained as an anthropologist). I just got home from having a long conversation with 2 female students: Rakey and James. I was giving them a lesson on names in Western culture, so they'd understand why randomly creating a name (Rakey) or choosing a male name (James) could hurt you in the business world. I have first-hand experience with female bearers of male names (not unisex names) being mocked at career day at my alma mater. Should you (or your daughter) excel to the top, this can be a stumbling block, as some associate it with lower socioeconomic statuses. However, this may change... who knows...

    But the lesson took a more relevant turn: Here in China, girls are also taking over male names because of the One Child Policy. In the past, girls names tended to emphasize grace, beauty, nature, etc. Masculine names emphasized success of all kinds, riches, perseverance, moral uprightness, and other inborn qualities. Now you meet more girls with masculine names (such as my friend, Miao Xin... Xin has 3 golds and means "riches/ wealth"), because the family lacks a son. In some ways, perhaps it signals that men and women are becoming more equal. However, there still remains the barrier that men extremely rarely have a feminine character (I've only met 2, and in 1 case it was the result of a typo when the government was issuing his I.D. card, which is nearly impossible to fix). My students expressed that maybe, in a way, giving girls a boy's name is a way of upgrading them to a son's status and role.

    So fast forward to this conversation. Perhaps I've spent much to long in China, but whenever I hear of people naming their daughters Hunter, Kyle, AddiSON, MadiSON, JackSON, Josiah, Corey, Cody, James, Michael, etc. I do think, "Hmmm... seems like they wanted a son." Now, I know that's not the case... but it is a symbolic gesture, as this article says. It's no different from letting your daughters play with cars, balls, toy guns, etc., but telling your sons not to play with dolls or that "Men don't cry." You are allowing women to take on male roles, but denying males the opportunity to take on female roles. To those who think their choices are isolated from cultural trends and influences... then why aren't you naming your daughter Eunice and your son Aloysius? Cultural trends. None of us are isolated from their influence...
    Emiliana Pari Debuts July 2014
    Soren Pasha, Caspian Bardia, Raphael
    Camellia, Valentina

  5. #119
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleepysessha View Post
    I think the emphasis on anti-feminism is not to accuse everyone who favors unisex or masculine names on girls of being anti-feminist. I think it's meant to enlighten those who ARE choosing masculine names for their daughters for feminist reasons that what they're doing is counter-productive. Sometimes people don't look much deeper than the surface concept of equality, and they think by naming their daughter James or George (or in my case Shawn) they are enabling her to have the same opportunities as a man. But there's a flaw in that thinking, because it still buys into the idea that masculine traits are superior. Subverting a woman's femininity to give her equal opportunities actually ends up devaluing her femininity and contributing to continued social and professional inequality (and naming is just a small portion of the ways in which this happens).

    Again I would think this is more for the benefit of people who are deliberately angling to give their daughter a leg up in a male-dominated society and may not be aware of the full message they're sending.
    I think you worded everything perfectly. Your explanation makes a lot of sense. Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by dovah View Post
    I think people get so upset about topics like these because they feel the need to justify their own likes and preferences. They need to say "That's not why I did it", and herein lies the fundamental problem. We can't know the reasons why someone chooses a name unless they tell us, and what this article says is there's a problem with the "reason" not the name.

    We can also (maybe) attribute the argumentative turn this thread has taken to the title of the thread. Before anyone even reads the article they're already on the defense because of the title's wording. One can infer from the title that all boys names on girls is "anti-feminist", even if the parent didn't select it with feminist intentions.
    This is kind of my feeling on the subject I suppose because I happen to like Logan for a girl, not because I think it would give my daughter a leg up in society or because I think masculine qualities are better, etc. Because I like the name.

    Quote Originally Posted by clairedelune View Post
    This thread really hits home for me as not too long ago I was considering the name Ashley for my son. Being afraid of how others would treat him, I took it off my list. It is still my most favorite boys name and I feel it would be an injustice by giving him a middle name I love more than his first name. In saddens me because technically Ashley is a unisex name, but because if its past popularity, most people would turn their noses up at it on a boy. However, lately I've been feeling more confident about using it ( especially after reading this thread) so I may just use it in the first spot after all...but again it all comes back to the teasing potential...I will be following this thread for a while. Maybe it will help me make up my mind once and for all about Ashley :/
    If you like it go for it! I mentioned in my previous post that my brother's best friend is named Madison, and although it may not seem that weird because of the "son" ending, just remember that most people aren't name nerds with an appreciation for history and all that when it come to names. So, most people meet him thinking he has a girly name. He just calmly explains to people that Madison was traditionally a name for boys and his mom liked it. He's gotten teased before, but he's a tough kid and doesn't let it faze him. Teasing will most likely occur with Ashley, or hey, maybe by then the lines will be so blurred with names there might be a few male Ashleys in his class.
    “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.”
    -George R.R. Martin

    alyssa ϟ twenty-one ϟ usa ϟ name lover

    If I ever have a baby, I would name him or her:
    Charlotte Matilda |Augustus Henry

    Anastasia Louise, Clara Penelope, Amelia Caitlin / Aiden James, Jase Alexander, Renly Isaac
    +more


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