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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,140
    For a toddler I would recommend an omelette pan. Omelettes are easy to make and healthy. Plus you can add what ever toppings he likes. Some toppings you can keep frozen- eg corn kernals, grated cheese or buy in tins so they don't lose freshness- eg small tin mushrooms or even toddler food in a jar as a filling- eg beef pasta. You could vary the need for ingredients to be on hand as you might be able to add milder bought food as the filling (eg stir fry Chinese veg or shredded chicken- things suited to a toddler.) Just beware the fillings are hot- so make sure you let it cool enough. Other filling ideas: tomato diced, ham/deli meat cut up, grated carrot.

    Boiled small pasta can also have the same things stirred into it- a super quick option is to add some frozen small pre mixed veg (eg carrot cubes, peas and corn) in the last 5 minutes- drain the lot then add some grated cheese. Instant veggie pasta! Alternatively, a tin of baby/toddler veggie based food could make a sauce to mix onto pasta- eg a pumpkin puree or a turkey and veg meal.

    Even easier than pasta- 2 minute noodles (don't use the flavour sachet as they're too salty) with toppings of choice added and some cheese. eg Microwave some frozen veg to add- the packet will tell you how long to cook it for. Or dice some ham and cube some tomatoes.

    A small tin of baked beans poured into a bowl and reheated in the microwave are nutritious and easy served with toast.

    While you are learning buy some jars of pasta sauce for pasta- add a little and freeze the rest in icecube trays ready for next time. Choose low sodium options- tomato based and sometimes a creamy style for variety.

    Cooking can be fun if you involve your little man.
    Remember raw food is OK too- think finger foods- carrot sticks, cherry tomatoes, cucumber cubes, cheese, sultanas, dried apricots, a few crackers, sliced fruit- eg strawberry, apple or melon- follow up with yoghurt for the protien.

    A bought roast chicken pulled apart and diced- freeze leftovers for another meal in portions. Add as a filling or serve with a finger food meal.

    A bowl of instant oats is very filling and healthy.

    Hope these ideas help- I tried to think of things that were healthy, quick and easy for a new cook.
    Last edited by emiliaj; March 31st, 2013 at 08:31 AM.
    Phoebe Eliza Grace arrived after 2 Years of IVF

  2. #18
    Are you interested in making your own baby food? Not a ton of actual cooking required and I always really enjoyed doing it and being able to give my son a greater variety than what was offered in the jars at the grocery store. If you can manage to steam some veggies and either cut them up really small (a la Baby Led Weaning) or use a food processor, you are good to go! My son loved everything from pureed avocado with plain yogurt to your basic mashed banana. It might be a good introduction to cooking for him!

  3. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,519
    Yeah, the current arrangement is pretty fantastic. Our building is close to the studios so it's a pied-a-terre for many entertainment people who have primary residences elsewhere. It has agreements with multiple local restaurants such that the concierge actually phones them, picks up the food and brings it to your apartment. And best of all, unlike traditional delivery it is actually cheaper than dining in (10% discount, no tips allowed). There is a large variety of world cuisines with amazing fresh ingredients. If I tried to replicate these meals it would be a) several hours and b) more money. I can be driving home, phone the concierge from the freeway, ask him to order such-n-such, come home and play with Antoine rather than kicking him out of the kitchen constantly, and then doorbell! Other people might choose to spend their money differently, of course. It's not that I don't know how to cook, it's more that I loathe and despise it and haven't done so for ten years.

    So while he is in this hybrid stage, for the next 6-8 months or so that he eats solid foods but isn't quite ready for a full adult meal, I think I need to prepare him something in the evenings. His daycare actually has an in-house organic chef with very good menus, and breakfast is currently an organic whole grain blueberry waffle and/or scrambled eggs (which I do make). So I was hoping to get recommendations on a cookbook for young children with 100-200 recipes (there are many on amazon, just curious if people have had success with one or the other).

    Thank you all for the tips--omelettes was a great idea; I never thought of them. @rge: we have an 'Antoine cabinet' as well with his foods. Since the refrigerator is completely empty, he has all of that to himself (his fresh fruits, his milk, applesauce, etc). He can't eat bagels or similarly hard things yet, but has enjoyed hummus, baba ghanoush, guacamole and various yogurts.

    @bluesparrow I started making scrambled eggs at age seven. Your job sounds horrible, I'm sorry.

    @emms thanks for the recs. You're right, I want toddle mush. In high school I decided to make everything from Joy of Cooking and made it through about two recipes once I realized we were talking about hours and hours of prep time.

    @pinkballerina yes, we are doing oatmeal usually once daily and pasta thus far has been very successful.

    @ottilie thank you for chiming in! The River Farm kids book and the Tessa Kiros one sound like want I'm looking for. Will check them out.

    @amandaberry thanks for the solidarity. He's not able to eat tough things like carrot sticks yet, but I'm sure he will be soon. And he loves guacamole, which admittedly I don't make.

    @bluesparrow again: the two halves of your statement should explain each other. Does it help to basically think of me as a man?

    @emiliaj thanks again for the omelettes tip, I think that should go over well.
    Blade, MD

    XY: AR
    XX: CVN

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Myrra * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Maysan _ Iman / Altair _ Fahd _ Faraj _ Khalil _ Najid _ Rafiq _ Tariq

  4. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,519
    Quote Originally Posted by flick View Post
    Are you interested in making your own baby food? Not a ton of actual cooking required and I always really enjoyed doing it and being able to give my son a greater variety than what was offered in the jars at the grocery store. If you can manage to steam some veggies and either cut them up really small (a la Baby Led Weaning) or use a food processor, you are good to go! My son loved everything from pureed avocado with plain yogurt to your basic mashed banana. It might be a good introduction to cooking for him!
    Flick, the thing is he's moved beyond purées now. I'm trying to find him 'bridge' foods between straight-up baby food and more adult fare.
    Blade, MD

    XY: AR
    XX: CVN

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Myrra * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Maysan _ Iman / Altair _ Fahd _ Faraj _ Khalil _ Najid _ Rafiq _ Tariq

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post
    Flick, the thing is he's moved beyond purées now. I'm trying to find him 'bridge' foods between straight-up baby food and more adult fare.

    Ah, ok, I wasn't sure how old he was. On the up side, that's a really fun age to feed! Lot's of experimentation and finding ways to get a wide variety of flavors into his palate. The one thing I made sure to do was to read up on and talk to his pediatrician about what babies his age can and cannot eat - I'm sure you probably already know these things, I was clueless - I just kept that in mind and then threw out all the notions people had about what you should feed babies (or little people). By age one, Caleb was basically eating what I would eat as long as it wasn't dangerous for him and it wasn't extra spicy (he would actually eat spicy food, but the poo it produced was NOT fun). I just kind of chopped it / cut it small enough for him to handle and let him go - I haven't really made any child specific meals since he was eating everything in puree form, though, he just eats along with what we are having. (except lunch, lunch is a small portion of what we eat plus milk / juice, a cheese stick / cube of cheese and yogurt and / or fruit).

    Something fun and very easy to cook, as other people have mentioned, is pasta.Babies his age LOVE eating / playing with (lol) pasta and there are endless possibilities with flavor and things you can add in. We usually use a whole grain pasta, which aside from being better for you - is way harder to overcook than regular pasta, so it might be good for starting out.(not sure if you CAN cook and just don't or you have only very basic abilities)

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