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Thread: Co-sleeping

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    5,340

    Co-sleeping

    Has any of the wonderful mama's (or papa's) here done this? I never considered having her sleep in my bed (I've read a little bit about it, and the rolling over and squashing her in my sleep put me off), but now that she's here I want her next to me all the time. Not only because she's so cute and snuggly, but with the breastfeeding, and me worrying about her breathing, this seems like the best way to do it, I get more sleep and I'm more relaxed. We had bought a moses basket and we use it for the shorter naps during the day, it's mostly during the night she sleeps with us. And the plan is to keep her in our bed until she starts sleeping through the night, but my boyfriend is worried that transition will be difficult, and that we'll be stuck with a family bed for the next ten years (we watched Away We Go a few days ago). So do any of you have any experiences, stories or suggestions? Is co sleeping a terrible idea?
    [FONT=Palatino Linotype][CENTER]My darling Marian Illyria Aphrodite, March 2013 & Little Bunny (a girl!) due 9th of February 2014[/CENTER][/FONT]

  2. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    677
    We've never done co-sleeping, so I can't offer advice there. I really just wanted to say how much I love Away We Go! So funny and heartwarming

  3. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,598
    This is one of those hot-button debates that pits the Attachment Parenting crowd against the mainstream. However, every single study has shown co-sleeping to dramatically heighten the risk of accidental suffocation. In some US states lawsuits have actually been brought against parents for co-sleeping with an infant who died. Again, every objective study has shown that the safest place for a young infant is in her parents' room but with her own, safely cordoned off, sleeping space. It can be a crib, cradle, Moses basket, or attached co-sleeper, but babies should have very firm mattresses, no bedding other than a fitted sheet, and definitely no pillows or large adult bodies.

    A cosleeeper is the best of all worlds. She is literally within arms reach at all times, making middle of the night breastfeeding or security checks effortless, but there is no increased risk of smothering.

    The counter-arguments are usually anecdotal ("I co-slept with all of my children and they survived!") or full of faux-scientific BS about the baby being more relaxed, bonding better, synching her circadian rhythms, etc with a cosleeping parent. And mothers in particular always insist that their 'mama' instincts would prevent accidentally rolling over or throwing a cover/pillow on the baby. As someone who has done autopsies and routinely takes medic transport calls on SIDS babies (85% of 'SIDS' deaths are due to smothering, either accidental or intentional) I can assure you that's not true.

    This is the kind of thing that's truly wonderful, snuggly and safe. It helps *you* sleep better, too, since there are no worries about her safety:

    http://www.armsreach.com/
    Last edited by blade; March 24th, 2013 at 01:06 PM.
    Blade, MD

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  4. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post
    This is one of those hot-button debates that pits the Attachment Parenting crowd against the mainstream. However, every single study has shown co-sleeping to dramatically heighten the risk of accidental suffocation. In some US states lawsuits have actually been brought against parents for co-sleeping with an infant who died. Again, every objective study has shown that the safest place for a young infant is in her parents' room but with her own, safely cordoned off, sleeping space. It can be a crib, cradle, Moses basket, or attached co-sleeper, but babies should have very firm mattresses, no bedding other than a fitted sheet, and definitely no pillows or large adult bodies.

    A cosleeeper is the best of all worlds. She is literally within arms reach at all times, making middle of the night breastfeeding or security checks effortless, but there is no increased risk of smothering.

    The counter-arguments are usually anecdotal ("I co-slept with all of my children and they survived!") or full of faux-scientific BS about the baby being more relaxed, bonding better, synching her circadian rhythms, etc with a cosleeping parent. And mothers in particular always insist that their 'mama' instincts would prevent accidentally rolling over or throwing a cover/pillow on the baby. As someone who has done autopsies and routinely takes medic transport calls on SIDS babies (85% of 'SIDS' deaths are due to smothering, either accidental or intentional) I can assure you that's not true.

    This is the kind of thing that's truly wonderful, snuggly and safe. It helps *you* sleep better, too, since there are no worries about her safety:

    http://www.armsreach.com/

    These are exactly what I was talking about, I think they are a really great solution for co-sleeping.

  5. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post

    This is the kind of thing that's truly wonderful, snuggly and safe. It helps *you* sleep better, too, since there are no worries about her safety:

    http://www.armsreach.com/
    This is what we're planning to get. Seemed like the best if both worlds to us, especially with two babies... I'm really hoping to breastfeed if possible (fingers crossed for champ latchers), and there's no way I want to get out of bed for feedings every two seconds.

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