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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    9,657
    Hi I am an Aussie too, so I am a bit unsure where the 'bad ass' word comes from as this is not an Aussie expression.

    Why not go with something strong, masculine, on trend but not trendy and with an easy to understand surname. I would totally anglicise the full three names eg Alexander Benjamin Taylor ie Dr Taylor.

    If you don't like your name now why would you like it more at 60? People come to a new country all the time and anglicise their names. There are many, many people who change their names to fit in more with the society in which they live. You can always be pround of your heritage without carrying the baggage of a difficult name everywhere. I also think that there is a bit of inequality here too because a woman can discard her maiden name when she gets married and that is okay but for a guy it isn't! That doesn't make any sense at all, because a woman can feel just as strongly towards her family without the original moniker, so let this man go ahead and change his future for the better without the baggage of his difficult name.

    I think Max full name Maxwell would be a good name, with Oliver as a middle Dr Maxwell Oliver Jackson nn Max.

    or

    Elliott Marcus Monroe nn Eli ie Dr Eli Monroe

    or

    Malachi Anthony Jackson nn Kai or Dr Kai Jackson

    or

    Abraham Joseph Grant nn Bram ie Dr Bram Grant

    or

    Alexander Blaise Emerson, nn Alex ie Dr A Emerson

    or

    Julian George Cooper nn Jules Dr Jules Cooper

    lor

    Indigo Fletcher Sebastian[/name] nn Indy Dr Indy Sebastian

    or

    Maximus Jacob Bennett nn Max ie Dr Max Bennett

    or

    Blake Elliott Harrison nn Blake ie Dr Blake Harrison

    Do any of these suggestions work for you?

    rollo

    PS People take the pressure off this guy to conform to your standards and let him go ahead and find a name that he really likes and wants to use for the rest of his life and he has definitely said he wants to exchange his long name for a usable Aussie style name.
    Last edited by rollo; February 28th, 2013 at 02:05 AM.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2,727
    What a shame that we're so homogenized that you feel pressure to change your name. Can you give us a clue about your ethnicity? Perhaps there's a more streamlined version of your current name that would retain some cultural tie?
    Say your name is
    Bhattacharya, an Indian name meaning "illustrious teacher."

    You could shorten it to Charya. Still quite nice. Or another close Indian name...
    Batra
    Baid (beautiful, simple, easy to pronounce)
    Chary
    Charan

    Anglicizations (if you must)
    Blake
    Bayer
    Bennett

    My doctor's name is Iraj Akhavan. I never know where to put the h. He's Iranian. Savvy, funny guy, incredibly busy practice. I don't know how I'd feel if he decided to change his name to say.. Irving Anderson. Like conspicuous nosejobs, I don't think Anglicizations inspire trust. I just call him Doc anyway.
    Last edited by emmabobemma; February 28th, 2013 at 12:52 AM.

  3. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by emmabobemma View Post
    What a shame that we're so homogenized that you feel pressure to change your name. Can you give us a clue about your ethnicity? Perhaps there's a more streamlined version of your current name that would retain some cultural tie?
    Say your name is
    Bhattacharya, an Indian name meaning "illustrious teacher."

    You could shorten it to Charya. Still quite nice. Or another close Indian name...
    Batra
    Baid (beautiful, simple, easy to pronounce)
    Chary
    Charan

    Anglicizations (if you must)
    Blake
    Bayer
    Bennett

    My doctor's name is Iraj Akhavan. I never know where to put the h. He's Iranian. Savvy, funny guy, incredibly busy practice. I don't know how I'd feel if he decided to change his name to say.. Irving Anderson. Like conspicuous nosejobs, I don't think Anglicizations inspire trust. I just call him Doc anyway.

    I really appreciate your advice and concerns regarding the future repercussions of drastically changing my name but I am happy with it so is my family.
    I really do not want to change it a name that is a derivative of my current name because I am going to a different state and I am going to start a new life where my name will not matter and I will not ever use it again.
    @Blade: I have not had any first hand experience with this but I believe that it is very very common for people to change their names in Australia and it is very understandable.
    Last edited by lieutenant; February 28th, 2013 at 06:24 AM.

  4. #32
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,167
    It is not 'very very common' for people to change their surnames in Australia. I am not sure where you're getting that from?

    I work with recent immigrants - a lot of them, on a regular basis. Australia has an extremely diverse racial mix. There are people with all sorts of surnames, in all sorts of professions.

    That said, if your name really is so difficult to spell and pronounce, and you're not at all attached to it, then I agree that you might as well change it. But please, if you want to be a doctor, don't change it to something hyper-cartoonish-masculine. I agree with other posters that that will not serve you well.

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    565
    Quote Originally Posted by jeska View Post
    It is not 'very very common' for people to change their surnames in Australia. I am not sure where you're getting that from?

    I work with recent immigrants - a lot of them, on a regular basis. Australia has an extremely diverse racial mix. There are people with all sorts of surnames, in all sorts of professions.

    That said, if your name really is so difficult to spell and pronounce, and you're not at all attached to it, then I agree that you might as well change it. But please, if you want to be a doctor, don't change it to something hyper-cartoonish-masculine. I agree with other posters that that will not serve you well.
    I thought that was very strange too, Jeska. Are you actually from Australia, OP? It is definitely not 'very very common' for people to change their surnames (except for the standard brides changing to their new husband's surname).
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