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Thread: Homeschooling

  1. #66
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    Oct 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by sugarplumfairy View Post
    Thank you for your condescending tone about my knowledge of the world. I'm sure you're much more educated and well-travelled than I am.

    I didn't say it was impossible. Only that it might be extremely difficult to be thrown into a demanding, competitive academic environment for the first time when you're 18 and your previous maths and science teachers were non-specialised educators. The kid in question not only came from a very privileged background (which probably included private teachers: you don't learn math and science by "devouring books"), but she was her accptance was largely based on her sports success (how American is that?). And just because a person is accepted into a top University doesn't mean they will graduate.

    I'm from Portugal. (By the way, homeschooling is legal here - provided the kids take public exams for every school subject at the end of the 4th, 6th, 9th, and 12th grades.)
    I'm sorry if you felt as though I was condescending. That was never my intent!

    It's not impossible and for many, many homeschooled students, it's not extremely difficult. If you search around online, there are stories and studies that say as much.

    In an earlier post, you said that homeschooling was illegal in your country.

    I used to be on the "only public schools" couch. However, since I've had children of my own and actually realized how messed up the public schools in this country are, I've come to the conclusion that there is no one answer for everyone. If you're capable, patient, and brave enough, I applaud you for trying to home-school your child. If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out. Just make sure the kid is the one who ultimately gets to choose where they wish to be educated.

    Personally, if we decide to home-school our children, they will be exposed to children outside of our own family - we have many neighbors with children. In fact, the little boy next door and my son are the best of friends! Our children will also be involved in activities where they will meet new people, they already are. It's not something we'll do just so our children can sleep in or not have to go out. It's something that will be done so they can get the best education possible, if we decide that's the way to go.

  2. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    1,269
    Quote Originally Posted by scarletrune View Post
    I'm sorry if you felt as though I was condescending. That was never my intent!

    It's not impossible and for many, many homeschooled students, it's not extremely difficult. If you search around online, there are stories and studies that say as much.

    In an earlier post, you said that homeschooling was illegal in your country.

    I used to be on the "only public schools" couch. However, since I've had children of my own and actually realized how messed up the public schools in this country are, I've come to the conclusion that there is no one answer for everyone. If you're capable, patient, and brave enough, I applaud you for trying to home-school your child. If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out. Just make sure the kid is the one who ultimately gets to choose where they wish to be educated.

    Personally, if we decide to home-school our children, they will be exposed to children outside of our own family - we have many neighbors with children. In fact, the little boy next door and my son are the best of friends! Our children will also be involved in activities where they will meet new people, they already are. It's not something we'll do just so our children can sleep in or not have to go out. It's something that will be done so they can get the best education possible, if we decide that's the way to go.
    Fair enough. What really matters is the kid's happiness and well-being. Everyone can benefit from having their parents invested and committed to their education, regardless if they go to school or not.

    (And I actually thought homeschooling was illegal here before I looked it up - that's how rare it is. But since you forced to follow the official curriculum and take exams it's not as free as in the US.)
    Arabella, Thibault, Sophia, Alfred, Eleanor, Rémi, Charlotte, Achille, Olivia, Clement, Elizabeth, Frederick, Maud, Benedict, Adèle.

  3. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    356
    There are definitely some amazing teachers out there, but there are also some pretty horrible ones. My brother had a teacher that hated boys, and the school had tried and failed many times to fire her. Parents were keeping their sons home because she was so horrible to them. There are several teachers I know of that don't bother showing up at their jobs, some only coming in 3 out of 4 days. I met a fourth grade teacher who thought that you make words plural by adding an apostrophe. In school, most of the time is spent in large classrooms with little individual attention, wasting time with things like lining up and taking attendance. Many kids are bored because they learn the material much more quickly than others. Others are completely lost.
    When I have kids, I will definitely keep homeschooling in mind as an option.
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  4. #72
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    Apr 2012
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    I think that you should do what is right for the child. There are many flaws in the education system but for some children they will thrive more if they are in a classroom situation with other children. On the other hand, there are children who will be much more happier working independently at home or with a private tutor. It is not a 'one fits all' situation. The family should do what is right for them.
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  5. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    As everything important is, the question of our children’s education will ultimately be decided by the way we view the world. From the fact that this debate is being conducted on two fronts, academics and socialization, it seems we all agree that education isn’t just reading, writing and ’rithmetic; it’s the preparation of a child to live in this world. And a good education doesn’t just equip a child to survive; it opens his eyes to the wonder and beauty of the world, gives him a hunger for more knowledge, and enables him to contribute to the good of society while preparing him, as well, to confront the darkness, danger and cruelty that are also part of the world.

    It also seems that most of us agree that parents have the right to choose how their children will be educated. So the question is how is such an education to be achieved? On the academics front, if you believe that the government is responsible for educating a country’s children and you trust its curricula and its methods, and if you believe that the best teachers are college-educated professionals, then you will send your children to public school. If you believe that parents are responsible for their own children’s education, and if you dislike the public school system’s current vision for educating the country’s youth, you are more likely to choose a private school agreeable to your vision for your children’s education or to homeschool. Some of you have said that the opposing viewpoints children will encounter in a public school environment are good for the child's development. Well, let's take Evolution vs. Creationism as a hot-button example. I assume that you who have chosen or are going to choose public school for your children want them to learn facts--to learn the truth about the world. Most public schools these days are teaching evolution as fact. But there is an opposing viewpoint which is not generally mentioned in public-school curricula. If you believe evolution is the correct scientific theory, would you want to send your child to a school that taught creationism as fact? If not, why not? Why not, if it's just an opposing viewpoint that's good for your child's mental development? Because you want your child to learn the truth. Those of us who believe that creationism is the correct scientific theory prefer not to have our children taught the opposing viewpoint as fact.

    There is no reason, especially today, for homeschooled children’s education to be limited by their parents’ lack of skills. The range of options is so wide, from online education to specialized tutoring, that no parent need be intimidated by thinking she must be all-knowing in order for her child to receive an ideal education. Yes, there are great teachers in the public system; I don’t deny it; I know a few. But even they complain about how they are limited by the politically-correct, government-issued curricula they are required to teach.

    On the socialization front, I realize that there are homeschool families who overprotect their children. It saddens me to hear the stories about homeschool kids who don't know how to interact with others, or who rebel at their over-restrictions and head for disaster. But I know a lot of homeschoolers, and there are no stories like these among my acquaintances. My 22-year-old brother, entirely homeschooled, has a job in the maintenance department of our local senior center, and from the anecdotes I hear from his coworkers and the elderly residents, he's one of the most popular guys in the place. All the little old ladies have a crush on him. A friend, also homeschooled through high school, is in college studying to be an X-ray technician; he's minoring in music and excelling in most of his classes. I was entirely homeschooled, and I'm selling my artwork in our family's art studio, and I teach both private art lessons and group classes. I (usually ) interact successfully with customers in our studio, and I enjoy teaching and have had many compliments after my group class sessions.

    The truth is that children were placed in families for a reason. A child’s education is his parents’ responsibility, not his government’s. In a family, a child is surrounded by parents, grandparents and siblings of different ages— a miniature society. He grows up interacting with people of different ages and different maturity levels, unlike his public-schooled contemporary, who often spends the majority of his time with his peers. A homeschooled child can receive his parent’s one-on-one education, tailored specifically to his needs, unlike many of his public-schooled contemporaries. If a homeschooled child has a learning disability, it will be his parents, who know him and his needs best, who work through the problem with him or who seek specialized professional help. If you want your young child's character to be molded by his teachers and his peers, without your interaction, then you'll put him in public school. If you want to oversee the molding of your young child's character, you'll be more likely to homeschool. Please notice I said "young child." I do not believe that I can or should keep my children wrapped in cotton wool until they're college-age. The opposing-viewpoint argument can be used here, too, but I think it is unreasonable to expect that children of six and seven can discern and decide for themselves what's right and what's wrong when confronted with all the viewpoints of their little classmates.

    I am proud to have been homeschooled, and I plan to homeschool my future children. I don't want them to be little carbon copies of me, but I want to try to build their characters on truth and teach them to think critically for themselves before they encounter the world on their own--hopefully smarter, better, stronger, and more creative than I am.
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