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Thread: Homeschooling

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisy451 View Post
    Saying that exposing children to peers who have bad morals will make them amoral is like saying that if a child meets someone who is illiterate they'll never learn to read. It just makes no sense.

    Honestly, I think it's good for kids to be exposed to "bad" kids. In my experience, a lot of "those" kids just had a lot of other problems to deal with. I had friends in high school who might've fallen into that category, but I got straight As all four years, the highest SAT score in my class, and was generally a "good" kid. Interacting with the "bad crowd" taught me not to fear or judge them, but rather to try to understand and accept them. It taught me to be more compassionate, not less. And I am interested in what "truth" you're talking about. If it's a religious truth, I'm afraid sheltering your children will do them more harm than good. My parents are religious so they educated me at a religious school, and when I became atheist in high school (of my own accord- there was only 1 other atheist in my high school and religion was taught daily all four years) I found it very painful to go to school and feel judged for my beliefs and I was terrified of telling my parents.

    But, your kids, your choices. To each his own.
    I agree with this. My family is Catholic and I went to public school. My husband isn't even religious, though he is open to the idea of a God, so he doesn't classify himself as atheist either.

    Despite being exposed to these "bad" people, I maintained my beliefs. I went to church every Sunday with my family. I attended CCD/Sunday School. I got confirmed. ETC. I learned about evolution in school and everything, which if I'm correct, my religion doesn't deny, or at least everyone in my family believes in it and they are better Catholics than me.

    Making friends and meeting people with different beliefs only helped strengthened mine and develop my own ideas. I still classify myself as Catholic, but I am in no way a die hard Catholic. I have my own issues with my religion, but there is no perfect religion out there and it's the one I feel most comfortable with, mainly because I grew up around it.

    As long as you talk to your children and let them know about sex, drugs, peer pressure, etc. rather than refusing to discuss it, your child will be fine. Heck, my parents refused to discuss sex other than "don't do it" but I ended up waiting till I found the "one." It wasn't for religious reasons at all, it was because I saw my friends get hurt and my sister even, so I wanted to wait. I guess that's something I learned from my "bad" peers.
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  2. #63
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    May 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisy451 View Post
    Saying that exposing children to peers who have bad morals will make them amoral is like saying that if a child meets someone who is illiterate they'll never learn to read. It just makes no sense.
    I hardly think this is a fair comparison. Peer pressure most certainly does influence human behavior. And the way parents deal with that varies from parent to parent and child to child. Some children can handle different types of exposure without compromising their own character. Others are much more impressionable, particularly younger children, and I personally would prefer to develop my children's own character first and expose them to other types of people in my own way rather than simply by tossing them into a school with hundreds of other children day after day. I do want to foster an attitude of compassion in my children for all types of people, and as I said earlier, I do want some measure of exposure to other ways of life. But not at the expensive of their own character. All parents will draw that line in different places, and where I draw it for my family will depend on the development and judgment of each individual child.
    Last edited by alzora; January 24th, 2013 at 10:16 PM.

  3. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by sugarplumfairy View Post
    Frankly this type of education seems to fit someone who isn't necessarily interested in going to university, or if so will chose a field within the Humanities or Arts which rely more on culture and good writing (I'm in that area, so I'm not saying those are any easier or less valuable). I have great reservations in imagining a homeschooled kid - unless he has had extensive private tutoring, which I think goes against the "homeschool" concept anyway - studying Medicine, Physics, Economics, or Architecture at a serious level.
    You seem like a reasonably smart girl. I would expect that you could go to Google and educate yourself on how many different types of people are out there in this world! Here is a story of a girl homeschooled her entire life that was accepted to Harvard.

    May I ask, which country do you live in?

  4. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarletrune View Post
    You seem like a reasonably smart girl. I would expect that you could go to Google and educate yourself on how many different types of people are out there in this world! Here is a story of a girl homeschooled her entire life that was accepted to Harvard.

    May I ask, which country do you live in?
    Thank you for your condescending tone about my knowledge of the world. I'm sure you're much more educated and well-travelled than I am.

    I didn't say it was impossible. Only that it might be extremely difficult to be thrown into a demanding, competitive academic environment for the first time when you're 18 and your previous maths and science teachers were non-specialised educators. The kid in question not only came from a very privileged background (which probably included private teachers: you don't learn math and science by "devouring books"), but she was her accptance was largely based on her sports success (how American is that?). And just because a person is accepted into a top University doesn't mean they will graduate.

    I'm from Portugal. (By the way, homeschooling is legal here - provided the kids take public exams for every school subject at the end of the 4th, 6th, 9th, and 12th grades.)
    Last edited by sugarplumfairy; January 24th, 2013 at 11:15 PM.
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  5. #69
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    Jan 2013
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    Wow, everyone is still indicating flaws in each other's beliefs. I guess I haven't missed much.

    @ alzora - I completely agree with you on this topic. Thank you for putting it so eloquently.
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    Like arrows in the hand of a warrior,
    So are the children of one’s youth.
    Happy is the man who has his quiver full of them;
    ~Psalm 127:4-5a

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