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Thread: Ttc 2013

  1. #161
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppy528 View Post
    Hi guys, just found out that this wasn't out month to get preg. Next month will be month 8 of trying. I'm feeling pressure to get pregnant already ... especially from MIL. I know she doesn't mean to push but there's always little texts to her son like "any good news?"...

    How many months do I have to spend not getting pregnant before I go to the baby making doctor? If I go to the dr now won't they just say keep trying? I'm not anovulatory and have very text book cycles so it seeeems like I should get a baby in there... but each month nothing. I'm not used to being bad at anything or underperforming. Practice doesn't seem to be making perfect and I'm getting really frustrated. I tell people I'm not trying to get pg if they ask just so I won't seem like a failure.
    I am a medical practitioner, and I work in the fertility field. It's difficult to say anything without knowing your history, but having textbook cycles is a very good first step. I don't know your age, but if you're under 35 you can give it at least 12 months before looking into medical help. Over 35 and I'd say see a doctor after about 6 months for basic lab work, only because time is more of the essence, especially if you plan on having more than 1 child.

    If you are relatively young, with regular cycles, and no known gynecological issues (like endometriosis, blocked tubes, etc), and you aren't getting pregnant, I'd first suggest having your partner do a semen analysis. It's the easiest first step to take. We, as woman, like to always assume that we're to "blame" if pregnancy isn't happening, but at least 40% of the time, there is some male factor issue contributing to the situation. Just want to put that out there. At the very least, it's great to have a baseline to compare to in the future if necessary.

  2. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by roseymaam View Post
    Poppy- I totally know how you're feeling. It's been about a year for me. I don't get as much pressure from my parents or in-laws, but I know how discouraged you are. If she's making you feel bad, I think it's ok to tell your MIL to back off. In a nice way, of course. Have your husband text back, "Asking me about it isn't going to make it happen any faster! jk. lol. No, but really."

    I just finally went to the OBGYN this month. I had been on my period for almost 3 weeks, so I really couldn't put it off any more. My regular doctor (a nurse practitioner) said she thought that I probably had PCOS. The OBGYN said he thought she was probably right.

    So, at 38, here I am trying to get pregnant with PCOS. So, yeah. I'm a little down. And still crampy. The doc gave me some goals and tasks to work on, lose weight, have more sex, etc. It always makes me feel better if I have a goal to focus on and clear steps to achieve it.

    Also, I'm spending way too much time on this site dreaming up names for fantasy babies!
    I would get some lab work to diagnose PCOS. It is very easy to do. Your Dr. will have you go in for a blood draw on day 2,3 or 4 of your cycle. Looking at FSH:LH ratio and E2 should give you a good indication to whether or not you have PCOS. Confirmation can be done with ultrasound to your ovaries.

    If you do have PCOS, the very, very best thing you can do is to eliminate simple sugars from your diet. You absolutely need to regulate insulin and glucose levels in your blood. Eat foods with a low glycemic index, meaning only eat complex carbs and make carbs a very small part of your diet. Focus on lots of veggies and lean proteins. The glucose and insulin levels will increase androgen production in your body, preventing ovulation and messing up your entire endocrine function.

    Also, like you said, try to lose weight if you are overweight. Losing even 10% of your body weight can help to establish regular menstrual cycles. Fat stores and secretes hormones. PCOS patients have too much estrogen and androgens in the blood. Losing fat will help to normalized proper hormone levels.

    Another great thing to do is to focus on cleaning out your liver because the liver is where hormones are metabolized. Dandelion and milk thistle tinctures or teas are great for this. It's important to eliminate caffeine and alcohol, too.

    Finally, nettle tea is really important to treat PCOS. It has chemical components that bind to Estrogen receptors in the body to help lower Estrogen levels in the body. PCOS patients often have high levels of estrogen from all of the cysts. The estrogen prevents a mature follicle from forming, thus no ovulation, or delayed ovulation of an immature egg. Nettle tea will help to regulate estrogen levels in the body.

    Hope this helps. My clinic does a lot of work with PCOS patients, and we have a lot of success at regulating ovulation and menstruation and improving fertility without drugs. It's important to realize PCOS is a lifelong condition that affects you far beyond fertility. PCOS predisposes you to cardiac disease and type 2 diabetes so the better you get a handle on it now, the healthier you will be long after your reproductive years

  3. #165
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    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by alzora View Post
    @blade, is that only if you have regular cycles? Mine in the past 6 months have been as short as 24 days and as long as 31 days. I'm on month 6 of trying and not feeling good about this month at all. I've been wondering if I should see a doctor like this month or next if we don't conceive. I was actually going to log on and post about that tonight to see what others on this thread thought, so it's convenient that I sign on to find it already being discussed.
    No, it isn't dependent on cycle length. The thought is as long as you're having regular intercourse (every 2 days or so) it doesn't matter if you have a 24-day cycle or a 34-day cycle; it doesn't matter if you ovulate on day 11 or day 15 or day 22. Whenever you do ovulate, you're having sex and have a normal chance of conceiving.

    You've shared a little bit about your accident and subsequent urogenital reconstruction. Your situation is quite unique. You might have, just guessing, intraabdominal adhesions from the extensive surgery that could block your tubes; abnormal ovarian / tubal anatomy; a retroflexed uterus, etc. You also shared that you weigh <100 lbs; being underweight can strongly negatively impact your fertility. Since you're so young still I would give it the full 12 months, perhaps trying to work on weight gain, but then you will need a rather unique anatomical evaluation. If you have any pelvic CTs/MRIs from your accident try to get a hold of them (through patient records request at the hospital at which you were treated) to share with your OB if the time comes.
    Blade, MD

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  4. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdsurfmama View Post
    Another great thing to do is to focus on cleaning out your liver because the liver is where hormones are metabolized. Dandelion and milk thistle tinctures or teas are great for this. It's important to eliminate caffeine and alcohol, too.

    Finally, nettle tea is really important to treat PCOS. It has chemical components that bind to Estrogen receptors in the body to help lower Estrogen levels in the body. PCOS patients often have high levels of estrogen from all of the cysts. The estrogen prevents a mature follicle from forming, thus no ovulation, or delayed ovulation of an immature egg. Nettle tea will help to regulate estrogen levels in the body.
    The advice sdsurfmama just gave about PCOS is excellent, except this. I have no idea what it means to "clean out your liver," but doing so is not compatible with life. Hormones are not "metabolized" into activity, though they are broken down in the liver via first pass metabolism and excreted. Your liver certainly isn't packed full of old estrogen that needs to be flushed away-- nor could it be flushed away with a soothing cocktail of dandelion milk. I have no idea how nettle tea works, if it works at all, but you certainly don't want to take anything that "binds to estrogen receptors all over the body." ERs are intranuclear proteins found in every cell in the body, though obviously more highly concentrated in end-organs on which estrogen acts. They act by directly binding DNA and turning on a variety of genes. Even if nettle tea did bind to estrogen receptors, the effect would not be to lower total body estrogen. Instead such a substance would either turn all the receptors on, causing a cascade of terrible PCOS-like effects, various cancers, etc, or it will block them and cause your body to desperately secrete even more estrogen in an attempt to stimulate failing end organs.

    @sdsurfmama what kind of practitioner are you? If you practice alternative medicine, like naturopathy, I think you should disclose that when giving advice. It is jarring to see mainstream thought juxtaposed with unsubstantiated alternative treatments delivered from a declared position of authority. In the spirit of full disclosure-- I am definitely not an OB; all I know about PCOS is the general stuff all physicians are required to know in order to be licensed. However I do know a great deal about the liver, as I do liver transplant research.

    @roseymaam your OB will doubtless work you up for PCOS in order to formally make the diagnosis, along the algorithm suggested above. Weight loss and dietary changes are absolutely the best thing you can do, but many women achieve a great deal of success by starting Metformin. Metformin has a great side effect of directly causing weight loss-- on average, 30 lbs-- which amplifies the effect.
    Last edited by blade; February 17th, 2013 at 01:14 AM.
    Blade, MD

    XY: AR
    XX: CVN

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Myrra * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Maysan _ Iman / Altair _ Fahd _ Faraj _ Khalil _ Najid _ Rafiq _ Tariq

  5. #169
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    Thanks blade and sdsurfmama. My Dr. wants me to concentrate on getting weight and sugar/carb intake under control for the next month or two, but then I think he's planning on starting me on metformin. He says my hormone levels look good. Other than the extra long period last month, my cycles have always been normal.

    Sugar and carbs are definitely a problem for me, but I'm working on it. I don't eat processed foods, I try to eat hormone free meat and dairy, I avoid BPAs where I can, I quit coffee (mostly) and I don't drink or smoke. I am a bit discouraged, but I feel like we have a plan. So I'm down, but not out.

    Thank you so much for your advice and concern. This discussion has made me feel a little better and I can't tell you how much I appreciate your thoughtful replies.
    Trying, trying, trying

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