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Thread: Ttc 2013

  1. #926
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post
    @MrsH this is absolutely true. Obesity is a major risk factor in just about every adverse pregnancy outcome you can think of. It's very tough during labor to accurately assess the fetus since the EFMs don't work as well through several inches of abdominal wall fat; often unfortunately internal monitors (placed directly in the baby's scalp) must be used. The risk of c-section is much higher, the risk of a macrosomic baby is higher, the risk of GDM is higher, the risk of preeclampsia and eclampsia is much higher, and if you actually get a c-section the risk of a deep or superficial wound infection is multiple orders of magnitude higher.

    Being at a healthy body weight and having normal glycemic control is obviously profoundly important for your general health, but it is especially true in pregnancy. Good luck, it sounds like you have an excellent plan.

    In the breakdown of pregnancy weight gain, only about 5-7lbs for a normal-BMI woman is actual weight gain to her body mass. The majority is placenta, baby, amniotic fluid and increased plasma volume. Of course an overweight or obese woman would add on these same pounds as her pregnancy progresses, but slow and steady reduction to her body mass can easily result in a perfectly healthy pregnancy where the ending number on the scale is lower than the starting number.
    Hey Blade.

    I know keeping a healthy weight during pregnancy can reduce the risk of C section, but is there anything else that the average healthy pregnant woman can do to reduce her chances of needing a C section? What about preventing breech position? The hospital I go to won't do breech delivery and I doubt I could find many doctors in the area willing to take breech delivery on if I was one of the unlucky people to have an upside down baby. I'm probably being overly paranoid, but I would like to do everything I can do avoid being one of the 33% of women who need a C section. Thanks.

  2. #928
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Emerald City
    Posts
    508
    It's absolutely a great idea to pee after sex to reduce UTIs. Peeing BEFORE sex is also recommended too. Urine is supposed to be sterile so it's essentisly rinsing out your urethra. For people with chronic UTIs some ladies will take a Bactrim tablet after sex but that is very very bad for babies... so don't stop peeing!

    I'm completely disillusioned to all baby names at the moment. I read all the babyname blogs and I'm like meh. They all sound dull and boring to me. This is probably because I'm depressed about my fertility issues but whatever. The only name I like right now is Opal. I have no idea why, and if I have a boy then ... idk my husband can figure out some name.
    Last edited by poppy528; December 31st, 2013 at 02:42 PM. Reason: partial post redaction
    “And remember, my sentimental friend, that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others.” L. Frank Baum, The Wizard of Oz

  3. #930
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,284
    UTIs are caused by entry of fecal bacteria (most commonly E Coli) into the urethra. Around 25% of women who are sexually active have relatively frequent UTIs-- they are linked to sex simply by mechanics. Essentially, all the rubbing helps push *your* fecal bacteria forwards. If you switch positions frequently-- esp if you go from front-facing to back-facing and back-facing to front-facing frequently-- the risk is increased.

    Therefore peeing before sex won't do much, if anything, whereas peeing afterwards will, as the bacteria are introduced during intercourse only, never before.

    One thing you might try is having both of you-- particularly you-- shower beforehand. Then you can simply fall asleep afterwards.

    Re: pelvic tilts: probably not necessary. It's common sense not to get up and walk around right away but I don't think you have to lay in some contrived position for hours.

    @skylark: while the *total* c-section rate in the US is about 33%, the *primary* c-section rate in low-risk, healthy women is about 13-15%. There is absolutely nothing you can do to primarily prevent breech positioning (that's all up to your baby), though if you find yourself with a full-term breech you can of course always undergo external version (which is painful)-- this is where the obstetrician manually attempts to flip the baby via a series of movements. Re: preventing c-section: most c-sections are due to failure to progress, and to genuine distress on the part of the baby (either infection or oxygen deprivation due to problems with the cord or placenta). Besides the obvious check boxes-- healthy body weight, reasonably aerobically fit, non-smoker, no vasoconstricting drugs like cocaine, no gestational diabetes, no postdates-- I'm not sure if there's anything that has ever been identified that can mitigate the risk of you being in that 13-15% whose baby has problems during labor, or whose labor stalls out despite augmentation.
    Blade, MD

    XY: Antoine Raphael (3.1.2012)
    XX: Cassia Viviane Noor (11.30.2013)

  4. #932
    Quote Originally Posted by blade View Post

    @skylark: while the *total* c-section rate in the US is about 33%, the *primary* c-section rate in low-risk, healthy women is about 13-15%. There is absolutely nothing you can do to primarily prevent breech positioning (that's all up to your baby), though if you find yourself with a full-term breech you can of course always undergo external version (which is painful)-- this is where the obstetrician manually attempts to flip the baby via a series of movements. Re: preventing c-section: most c-sections are due to failure to progress, and to genuine distress on the part of the baby (either infection or oxygen deprivation due to problems with the cord or placenta). Besides the obvious check boxes-- healthy body weight, reasonably aerobically fit, non-smoker, no vasoconstricting drugs like cocaine, no gestational diabetes, no postdates-- I'm not sure if there's anything that has ever been identified that can mitigate the risk of you being in that 13-15% whose baby has problems during labor, or whose labor stalls out despite augmentation.
    Thanks for the quick reply, Blade. I guess I need to start doing prenatal workouts every day to improve my cardio. I'm glad my risk is less than I thought it was.

  5. #934
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by alzora View Post
    @Kataklysm, this entire month I too have been absolutely off-the-wall name crazy, though I try not to bring it up to my husband. I have a twin sister who loves names, so I just text her my name ideas. Every single day. And she loves them. Except for the ones she hates. The other day I texted her the name Alzora to see what she thought of it, mentioning that it's my user name on here (it's nothing close to my real name; I found Alzora an old gravestone and hadn't considered it for a baby until just the other day). Anyway, my twin said it sounded boyish, I guess because of the Al-. Whatever. As for using your sister's name: You should not let her pressure you on such an important decision. That said, I understand your frustrating predicament, because it's hard to deny a sister anything. I adore my sisters and if any of them made such a request, my empathy would compel me to oblige them. I guess that's a tough decision you have to look forward to once you get pregnant. :/
    I did actually apologize to my husband for driving him nuts about names, considering we have even conceived yet. But, he assured me that he was glad I was thinking about them because this isn't a subject he spends much thought on. And he has been really good about giving me honest feedback about the names currently on my list, so I've been slowly whittling it down. If he doesn't like it, we will probably never use it...so why have it on there?

    It's funny that you like Alzora because I just recently added Zora to my list and, surprisingly, my husband didn't nix it! In fact, I found out he has a great-aunt with the name and he said she was a very nice lady, so we are entertaining it for the future (he told me as a kid, he thought her name was Aunt Zorro, lol). My mom, on the other hand, said it sounded strange and that Southerners have been known to come up with strange nicknames. I think that was a nice way of saying she might get picked on if we name her that... Zorah is actually a Biblical place - Samson's hometown, if you will. So, I kind of also like that connection.

    As for my sister's middle name...I don't hate it, but I don't love it. It's Danielle, so it's a bit dated to me. I keep trying to freshen it up with suggestions like Danica, Daniel (for a boy), etc. Or the fact that her first name is French and the names we've chosen for our first daughter are both French names. But, nooo...nothing appeases her. She asked me how many kids we plan to have so she can ensure one of them has her name! Sisters!
    I go by Kat.

    Currently loving:

    Aria ~ Aurelia ~ Autumn ~ Beatrix ~ Brielle ~ Cait ~ Calliope ~ Cassia ~ Cassidy ~ Catriona ~ Cora ~ Eden ~ Elise ~ Emilia ~ Genevieve ~ Giselle ~ Harper ~ Helena ~ Isla ~ Ivy ~ Julianna ~ Lyra ~ Natalia ~ Philippa ~ Selah ~ Winter ~ Wren ~ Zora

    Aaron ~ Alton ~ Avery ~ Benjamin ~ Caleb ~ Daniel ~ Edmund ~ Gabriel ~ Grey ~ Lucas ~ Noah ~ Reece/Rhys ~ Thomas

    Mother to a white bearded fur-ball, Merlin, an easily excitable pup, Willa, and a grey munchster, Grady!

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