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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    426
    I love Hector and Tiberius. Lovely names. I always love your lists.
    Always changing...
    Sigrid, Frieda, Ragna, Rosemary, Edwina, Magdalen
    Ragnar, Sergius, Fergus, Severin, Severus

  2. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,514
    Alaric: it fit so beautifully with Endymion, but as a first it's equally stunning. King of the Visigoths, with a nice crisp sound.

    Altair: another one on my own short list (for middles). I've let mention that my husband is Arab and Arabic is spoken in our home; when Arabic speakers pronounce this name, it's lovely. I like that it's astronomical and stately but in no way remotely religious [big problem re: Arabic names if you're not Muslim]. When English speakers say it, it sounds like 'altar,' but in Arabic it has three syllables (Al-tye-eer). I fear the English pronunciation will naturally trump in the UK.

    Artegal: something about the phonetics of this name rubs me the wrong way. Sort of a cross between Donegal and Arthur.

    Cicero: I like the historical Cicero, very cynical and funny, but agree with emma that it's a one-man-name.

    Galileo: likewise. In the middle as an honor-name, wonderful; as a first, too much.

    Hector: In the US Hispanic people have preserved this wonderful old name (like they did with so many Greek and Latin names, via the Catholic Church) such that it's got a distinctly Latin vibe here. In the UK, with a clipped British accent, it would be fantastic. The historic/literary Hector was a great namesake-- dashing, good husband & father, courtly, brave, etc.

    Hermes: no major deities? Especially not one that rhymes with wormies.

    Hylas: I keep seeing 'alas!'

    Lorand/Roland: love the dashing, romantic, heroic Roland. Defeating those evil Saracens and all.

    Marinell: beautiful, I love it, and the literary connection to the Faerie Queene. Perhaps Marino would be more masculine and wearable though?

    Orville: in the US, this is a) a popcorn maker, whose name was designed to connote fustiness and b) the co-inventor of the airplane. I'm not wild about it.

    Ovid: Another one-man name, and as emma mentioned I think it has too many unfortunate cross-etymologies with eggs.

    Pelleas: Prefer Melisande for the girls!

    Rodomante: not usable, unfortunately

    Seneca: I love the aesthetics of the name. Yes, he lived during Nero's reign, but was infinitely more interesting and virtuous. The Native American tribe never called themselves the Seneca; that was imposed upon them (and this is unlikely to raise any eyebrows in the UK, where I'm sure few have heard of the Iroquois, let alone the Seneca). For some reason I find it more easily appropriable than Cicero.

    Tiberius: still my favorite classical name on your list. It's regal and again has that subtle nature connection.

    My short list:

    Tiberius
    Alaric
    Marino
    Roland
    Hector
    Seneca

    PS Is Faramond still up for consideration, now that Faramir is out?
    Blade, MD

    XY: Antoine Raphael
    XX: Cassia Viviane Noor

    Aquila * Chrysanthe * Emmanuelle * Endellion * Ione * Jacinda * Lysandra * Melisande * Mireia * Petra * Rosamond * Seraphine * Silvana * Theophane / Blaise * Cyprian * Darius * Evander * Giles * Laurence * Lionel * Malcolm * Marius * Peregrine * Rainier

    كنوز الصحراء الشرقية Hayat _ Qamar _ Sahar _ Amal _ Hanan / Altair _ Fahd _ Ilyas _ Sajjad _ Saqr _ Tariq

  3. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    341
    Alaric is my fave from your list
    [CENTER]
    Mommy to
    Nils David * Serafina Ann

    Loves:
    Zia, Lorelei, Elowen, Vera, Adeline, Cordelia, Zorah

    Judah, Peter, Fredric, Olin, Dean, Jonah

  4. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    5,340
    Thanks everyone!

    ash: i haven't seen The Hunger Games (or read it) so didn't know!

    emma: Herne and Endymion are still the top two, I just need back up! as for the "former" middles... I still love thE Endymion Alaric Wythe combo, I most likely won't touch it. I see what you mean about Rodomante. all i can think of are rats now, and about the one man names. You are s very clever.

    njordv: thank you sweetie!

    blade: Altair would be (in our home) be pronounced the arabic way. Godfather speaks arabic, it was his suggestion. Good points on all names, as usual! Faramond, I forgot him. Yes, he's still on the list. Faramond is super romantic. (And Marinell sounds like a girl. It's still a middle though.)

    After your comments we're left with:

    Roland
    Seneca
    Hector
    Faramond
    Altair (Al-tye-eer, as blade said.)
    Tiberius

    top 2, bottom 4? Would I be the meanest mummy in the world to give a child one of these names?
    [FONT=Palatino Linotype][CENTER]My darling Marian Illyria Aphrodite, March 2013 & Little Bunny (a girl!) due 9th of February 2014[/CENTER][/FONT]

  5. #24
    Out of the ones you have left:


    Roland - I love the weight behind the name. I just don't particularly like the sound of it.

    Seneca - Despite its classical origins, it still feels like Dakota or Cheyenne to me.

    Hector - This is a good solid name with a lot of weight.

    Faramond - I like this one a lot.

    Altair (Al-tye-eer, as blade said.) - I like this one a lot, as well. He might have to correct people's pronounciation, but that's not the end of the world.

    Tiberius - My favorite on the list. Solid with loads of charm. Very usable.

    My top two for you are Tiberius and Altair.
    Silas ~ Gideon ~ Lincoln ~ Ezekiel ~ Malachi ~ Samuel ~ Ezra ~ Charlie ~ Gabriel ~ Elliott
    Maisie ~ Sophie ~ Naomi ~ Willa ~ Evangeline ~ Freya ~ Vivienne ~ Nora ~ Josephine ~ Daphne

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