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  1. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    575
    @ashthedreamer I really love Lilia, Nadezhda and Nikolaevna! Do you think Lilia as a fn for either of these?
    Josephine Athénaïs - Josephine Ivy - Myriam Athénaïs - Vivienne Josephine
    Athena Beatrice - Beatrice Cecile - Eléonor Anne-Sophie -Myriam Beatrice - Meredith Elizabeth
    Ambrose Aristide - Ulysses Aristide

    Girls: Aenor, Bérangère, Bérénice, Catalina, Honorine, Nadezhda Boys: Augustin, Calixte, Emeric, Hugo, Lambert, Maxandre, Maxence, Yves

    ~~Formerly know on the boards as The.TX.Belle~~

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    5,340
    Yeah, it's pretty common to have a middle like that, ovna or ova depending on father's name.

    My favourite eastern european names:
    Polina
    Ludmila
    Libuse
    Rusalka
    Vendula
    Ruzena
    Roksana
    Vladimira
    Tamara
    Annushka
    Natasha
    Oksana
    Verusha
    Lenka
    Petra
    Marketa
    Marcelina
    Svetlana
    Irina
    [FONT=Palatino Linotype][CENTER]My darling Marian Illyria Aphrodite, March 2013 & Little Bunny (a girl!) due 9th of February 2014[/CENTER][/FONT]

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    913
    My family (3 generations back) came from Russia...

    Some of our family names are

    Sasha/Sascha
    Lizaveta
    Natasha
    Tanya
    Polina

    My fave is Lizaveta.. nn's Liz or Etta!
    boys names drive me crazy!

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    597
    It's not a middle name per se, but a patronymic as another poster said, a way that you form a name when you want to be respectful. In the same way that we say Ms. [Last Name], Russians tend to use the first name + the patronymic. It's sometimes put in the middle spot, but it doesn't function in the way our middles do. It's not a choice or a tradition, just a way that you can refer to anyone, if that distinction is clear at all? I lived in Russia for about two years, anyway, and this is my understanding of it. So, for example, a woman I knew named Ana Poltavetsa (full name), would be called Ana Mikhailovna by her students, since her father's name was Mikhail. Students would call me Toma Alonzovna, even though I was not Russian, and that was not my middle name.

    Favourite Russian girl names:

    It's very uncommon for Russians to name their daughters anything unusual, but I met a little girl called Margretka, which is the Russian word for daisy, and kind of pretty.

    Hmmm, Ksenya might be one you haven't heard.

    Olya, which is a nn for Olga, but much prettier I think!

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,962
    The ovna is a possessive, like you are of this person. It's a first born child thing. Often besides the first born there is no middle name. I think-ich is another suffix you could use this way.

    Isaacovich is my brother in laws mn.

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