Names Searched Right Now:
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 6 to 10 of 11
  1. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,962
    Correction- Vinca

  2. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,042
    Thanks for posting about these, taz. Slavic nicknames are really interesting to me.

    Very similar in Poland, while some names have standard nns, my name, Caroline, becomes Karolinka, adding the k in there is pretty common. Others just have variants that are considered nns/endearments. Zbigniew > Zbyszek, Robert get either Robercik or Robuś as an endearment. Jadwiga>> Jadzia. Michał (Michael) would probably get Michaś as a child, like Robus, it's a diminutive version that would mean approx "little Michael", but many parents continue to use those long after their child is grown. Barbara >> Basia or Baśka. Eva gets Evka which I think is adorable. Stanisław (Stanley) gets Stasiek or Stacho.

    Standard nn for Aleksandra is Ola.

    I think I'm probably the poster who knows a little Veronica nn Vonka...its not the standard Russian nn, but certainly a familiar sound for a nn, she's Ukrainian.

    (Forgive my accent marks, I get lazy with them when typing. I married into this as well and am still not fluent, haha. Taz, did you take a conjugated name when you married? I think some Russian names have that too. Many families are dropping it these days, but being the name nerd that I am, I kept the conjugation so my surname and my mother in laws surnames end in "ska" while my husband's and his father's end in "ski")

  3. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,042
    Because now you got me thinking....some others for you (focusing on girls names!!)

    Maria: Manka, Marysia, Marysienka
    Magdalena: Magda, Madzia
    Zofia: Zosia
    Anna: Ania, Anka
    Agnieszki (Agnes): Aga, Agnisia, Agusia, Nisia
    Ilona: Ilonka
    Adela (Adele): Adelka
    Cecilia: Cecilka, Cilka, Cilinka
    Diana: Dianka, Dia
    Elena: Ela, Elka, Elenka
    Joanna: Asia (THAT was a confusing one for me!), Joasia
    Helena: Hela, Helenka
    Natalia: Natalka
    Martina: Martinka
    Silvia: Silva, Silvinka

    I've also heard Verka for Vera! You'd have to ask your family which of these translate to Russian and which are clearly Eastern European, but dont quite make the jump.

  4. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,962
    My husband's surname is Lithuanian so it had the -skis ending but when he came to the US in the early 90s they took an -sky ending...apparently this ending is typically Jewish and it is the original ending that his family dropped to avoid religious persecution.

    My husbands older brother's mn is the possessive version of my fils name while my husband has no mn...this is I guess typical in Eastern Europe.

    I love Silvinka!

    We have an Ilona/Elena Dianka/Dianka, Raisa, Rya, more Anna/Anya than I can count!, Masha...

    I am drawn to the name Lubov / Luba but I don't know if it could work as a fn on an American girl!

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,962
    My daughter's mn is Ida (ee-duh not eye-duh) after my husband's grandmother. The nn Idishka is so cute I think I would've used it as a fn if only I had known!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •