Category: unique baby names

Not telling baby name

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Our sincere thanks for permission to reprint this moving article which appeared recently on romper.com.

When you’re pregnant, it can often seem like your body, your baby, your decisions, your life are public domain. Everyone wants to touch your belly. Everyone wants to know what kind of genitalia your baby will be born with. Everyone wants to know how you’re feeling and tell you how to feel better. And everyone wants to know your baby’s name.

In all honesty, I didn’t mind the belly rubs as long as people asked first. I talked openly about my brutal morning sickness and intolerable heartburn because if someone asks you how much you throw up in a day, they better be prepared for a gruesome answer. However, when the inevitable question came up, I didn’t tell anyone my baby’s name because, in the end, and like everything else in pregnancy and childrearing, it was none of their business.

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Baby Names Before 1850

vintage baby names

Records on baby names only started in the US in 1880, and so getting an accurate read on what babies were named before that has been difficult at best. But now a researcher named Douglas Galbi has compiled lists of baby names drawn from census records of the early 19th century. With the help of Esita Rocha, we combed through Galbi’s data on baby names from 1800 to 1850 in search of trends, patterns, and vintage baby names that go way beyond the expected John and Mary, Elizabeth and James. Here, our findings, illustrated by American folk art of the same period.   – Pamela Redmond Satran

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Unusual historic names

By Andy Osterdahl

For the past fifteen years I’ve been collecting and categorizing various oddly named American political figures. In July of 2011, I began to share my findings and established the “Strangest Names in American Political History” blog that presently contains biographies of over 560 unusually named elected officials. In a previous article I wrote for Nameberry in July of 2014, I included examples of the origins of a number of particular names. Since that time I have made a number of new and unusual discoveries!

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Popular Names Your Mom Never Heard Of

new baby names

Great news! Your private lists are back! Access them through your member panel. It will be a few more days till you can modify lists or create new ones.

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Any newcomer to the contemporary world of baby names may be amazed at how diverse and – to use a Mom word – different names have become. In the generation since Mom was naming you, the list of US Most Popular Name has expanded to include more ethnically distinct names, words freshly morphed into names, and newly-minted monikers. Mom might not recognize many of today’s Top 500, used for hundreds of babies now but virtually nonexistent in the 1980s.

Warning: If you choose one of these names for your baby, you should expect surprise – or possible shock – from Mom (and Dad too).

Popular baby names today least likely to be familiar to your Mom include:

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Eccentric British Baby Names

British baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Every few months, we love to peruse the birth announcements in the London Telegraph in search of new trends in British baby names.  The most recent listings included a bumper crop of unique, eccentric choices.  Does this mean that parents in England, like those in the US, are becoming more attracted to unusual names?  Though the British birth announcements still include plenty of expected names like Amelia and Beatrice, Henry and Alexander, we’re also seeing more distinctive, even edgy names.

In English style, this usually means names that have traditional roots and are not invented or drawn from places or things the way they might be in the US.  But we are also seeing more baby names drawn from far-flung cultures, cross-gender choices, and revivals of long-dormant names. In the middle, there are more surname names along with animal names such as Bunny and Bear.

Here, 50+ real baby names from the recent British birth announcements that evidence the new heightened taste for the unique….or is it just traditional English eccentricity?

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