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Category: royal baby names

George: A Name Fit for a King

George-vi

Ever since the Royal Pregnancy was announced, there has been a shifting set of girls’ name possibilities set forth, with Alexandra, Charlotte and Victoria in the lead. But when it comes to the little prince, the frontrunner has been George all the way. George is the name of six previous kings, including Queen Elizabeth’s father. Now, in true fairy tale tradition, we want to bestow our wishes for a possible Prince George—based on the attributes of some notable bearers of his name.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
royalprincessalice

By Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names

Traditionally, members of British royalty have not only been given a whole string of middle names, most have also been given an affectionate nickname. Queen Victoria’s children, for example, answered to Vicky (Victoria), Bertie (Albert), Alee (Alice), Affie (Alfred), Lenchen (Helena), Loosy (Louise), Leo (Leopold) and Baby (Beatrice).

Previously, these names were kept within the family. But more recently, Charles and Diana broke the mold by formally announcing after their sons’ births that they were going to call WilliamWills” and that Henry was to be called “Harry”.

This then opens up a variety of options for William and Catherine. Let’s say they choose the name “Elizabeth Diana Catherine Charlotte” for a daughter.  They could use a nickname for the first name – Bess, Betsy, Lily, Eliza? – or announce that they will call her by one of her middle names, or even a nickname from the middle name – Lottie, say, or Kitty.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
royalprince

by Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names

It’s July!  Which means, the month of the Royal Baby’s arrival is here. Many assume that the Royal couple only have a very small pool of names to choose from and, while this is true, royal history shows us that William and Catherine actually have a lot of flexibility in the way they can use those names.

Let’s take the example of King George V and Queen Mary who named two consecutive kings: Edward VIII and George VI. Their eldest son was given the appropriately “kingly” first name of Edward, but was actually known as David to the family – his full name being “Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David”.

The second son was named “Albert Frederick Arthur George”, but called Bertie by his family and friends. When he became king, the name Albert had no precedent as a regnal name (and was deemed a bit too ‘Germanic’ in the aftermath of WWI) so it was easy enough to use one of his middle names instead.

They were also creative with their daughter’s name. She was given the names “Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary“, but was always known as Princess Mary.

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Royal Baby Name: All bets are on!

william-kate

As the due date for the Duchess of Cambridge approaches, the British betting establishments have gone into mad odds-shifting mode on every aspect of William and Kate’s child including the royal baby name.  They’re taking bets on the future sovereign’s hair color to future university and career choices and even which magazine will have the exclusive photos. But of course the main focus is on the baby’s name–putting on the table some obvious, conventional royal ancestor options, and also some bizarre, outrageous outliers.  Here, the bookmaker’s top options for the royal baby name.

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PRincessAmalia

In this week’s Nameberry 9, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel’s choices run from the royal Amalia to the unique Catchen, showing the anything-goes spirit of baby naming today.

The only rule of baby naming in 2013?

Anything goes.

From reliable classics to nouveau inventions to family heirlooms, the range of possibilities is truly infinite.

So it is no surprise that the baby name news ran the gamut this week.  On the one side are Dutch royals and a supermodel’s three sons with regal names.  On the other?  We have a few nouveau inventions and discoveries that could work nicely for a twenty-first century child.

All of this leads to my favorite piece of baby naming advice from the blogosphere this week: don’t whittle down your short list, discarding names for one reason or another.  Narrow your list UP, until you find the one that you truly adore.

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