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Category: royal baby names

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By Tara Ryazansky

When LilKim named her new baby Royal Reign, I was taken aback for a second by this bold combo. I mean, a regal name makes sense for the queen of hip-hop and all, but it got me wondering –do aspirational names rule or are they a dying trend?

When I say aspirational names, I am not talking about names with a slight royal connection that gives them an air of wealth and importance. Nothing as subtle as a queenly namesake like Victoria or with a lofty meaning like Casper, which means “wealthy man”. I am talking about the more literal choices, such as Cash and Diamond, King and Prince, that try to project grandeur and luxury.

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Badass Princess Names

photo copyright Lissy Elle

A cartoon in a recent New Yorker features a little girl and her mother surveying Halloween costumes in a shop window. “I want to be whichever Disney princess is the most badass,” the girl says.

Badass princess is an image that not only appeals to contemporary little girls but to their parents when choosing a name.

Like the hipster cowboy names we wrote about recently, badass princess names are appealing not so much because of their sound or their style but because of the complicated image they convey. These are girl names that are both decidedly feminine and rooted in tradition, but are not at all conventional or conservative.  They’re creative and edgy, but not invented or unorthodox like Blue or Bellamy.

Rather, these are names that could be – that in many case are – used for royalty, yet they’re a lot, well, badder than names like Elizabeth and Victoria.

The badass princess names are  classy and sassy, cosmopolitan yet earthy, chic but never trying too hard.  It’s an image that many an urbane parent can embrace for her daughter, and that a little girl can have fun living up to, in Halloween costume and beyond.

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Classic Baby Names: 10 timeless choices

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Classic baby names can encompass several different categories. There are Biblical names, from Anne to Zachary. There are names rooted in ancient cultures, including Atticus and Juno, which have survived or are being revived today.

And then there are the classic names that have been well-used in English-speaking cultures over the decades and centuries. While classic names by any definition do move in and out of style just like other names, some manage to endure better than others and become, well, the most classic classic names.

Here, our picks for ten of the best classic baby names today.

girls

Catherine – The Duchess formerly known as Kate has done much to swing fashion toward the C-beginning version of this most classic of girls’ names.  Catherine, classic in any spelling, has been borne by saints and queens along with some of the most inspiring literary heroines, including Heathcliff‘s Cathy of Wuthering Heights.   Greek for “pure,” Catherine comes in countless international variations and with a wide range of nicknames.  Most stylish today are Cate or Kate or the vintage-feeling Kay or Kitty.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
royaalty

Our thanks to Anna Otto of Waltzing More than Matilda for allowing us to reprint this condensed version of her fascinating blog.  See the whole post here.

Royal babies have been on everyone’s mind lately, and we recently saw two babies born in the royal family within less than a month of each other.

Not only have been people been doing web searches for Prince George and Maud Windsor, they’ve been searching for royal baby names in general, uncommon royal names, and royal names that nobody else is using. So here is a list of queens and princesses connected to English royal houses by either birth or marriage, whose names aren’t popular or common.

Adeliza

Adeliza of Louvain married Henry I, and became queen of England. She didn’t  produce any royal heirs; however, after Henry’s death she re-married, and had seven children and is an ancestor of many of the noble English families. William the Conqueror had a daughter called Adeliza, named after his sister – the name wasn’t uncommon amongst Norman-French aristocracy. Adeliza is a medieval English form of Adelais, a short form of the original old Germanic form of Adelaide. It’s pronounced ad-uh-LEE-za. Although it doesn’t have any connection to the name Elizabeth, it looks like a combination of Adele and Eliza, and might feel like a way to honour relatives who have variants of these names.

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reese

So….2,449 people named their baby girls Reese last year. Which means that upon meeting those 2,449 little girls, almost everyone for the rest of their lives is going to say, Reese? You mean R-E-E-S-E? As in Reese Witherspoon?

If you name your baby Reese and you’re NOT a Legally Blonde maniac, you’re going to have some ‘splaining to do. Because names like Reese — and Aaliyah and Ashton and Miley and Penn — are so closely tied to one celebrity that people can’t help but think that choosing the name amounts to major fandom.

And thousands of parents every year choose names that are inspired by celebrities.

In fact at this very moment, an untold number of new parents in Britain are waiting to hear the royal baby name so they can adopt it for their own already-born children.

So our question of the week is: Can you imagine you’d be one of them?

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